What fork to replace a Girvin Vector 2?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by bclee, Jul 11, 2003.

  1. bclee

    bclee New Member

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    I used to bike a lot, then for years I lived in flatland and was uninspired (what's the point of riding a bike on pavement?). Now I'm back living somewhere less flat with good trails, and I'd like to start again.

    I have a hard tail with a Girvin Vector 2 fork that I used to love, but of course by now the elastomers have turned to stone and I haven't been able to locate replacements for years. I can still get the upgrade non-elastomer shocks from later models, but they are quite expensive and the fork itself doesn't work as well as it used to.

    So what's a good cross country fork that tracks well? I originally chose the Girvin over a RS Judy (the first ones were just out at the time) because the Judy just seemed sloppy. And the cartridges kept failing on everyone that had one. I'm sure shocks have gotten better in the many years since the last time I was looking.
     
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  2. frey

    frey New Member

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    I'd recommend the Rock Shox Duke range. They're all air sprung, so they're adjustable for your weight and needs. They also use the legs from their freeride fork the Psylo so they track very well. Good value too.
    If you need something cheaper, then look at a Rock Shox Pilot, they've been recevied very well, especially the more expensive air sprung ones which a lot of magazines have said may well be too good, and make the Sid seem too expensive...
     
  3. Craig Merrell

    Craig Merrell New Member

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    So did you replace the shock or have to get a different fork?

    I have the same problem and tried to find an Amp fork (also 'trailing-link') but they no longer manufacture them.

    I prefer light weight so let me know if you have any reccomendations.

    ~ Craig Merrell
     
  4. Hecubus

    Hecubus New Member

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    Check what type of steerer and headset your bike uses. Elastomer forks have not been made for a while so its possible you have a 1" steerer tube or maybe even a threaded headset. If thats the case your choices will be far more limited.
     
  5. Alnamvet

    Alnamvet New Member

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    I remember Girvin...if you REALLY want to go on the cheap, and in fact you have a 1" or threaded stem, how about a Girvin Flex Stem? I have a dozen or so brand new, and would be happy to send you one free...yes FREE!;)
     
  6. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

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    I'm trying to remember the girvin vector forks

    were they the rigid legs with a shock near the headtube?

    If so then wow what a piece of history!!!

    If it will fit your bike i'd buy a marzocchi fork, they seem to have the edge on rockshox these days.

    hooray for retro:cool:
     
  7. Alnamvet

    Alnamvet New Member

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    bclee....go to risseracing.com. They have all the replacement parts you need, some aftermarket to make the Vector II better. The Vector Duckwah, is a rigid fork with the stem as part of the elastomer/swing arm shock set up. At the time, they were far better than anything Rock Shoxs could make, and there were several companies that made aftermarket elastomers, etc., to improve on what Girvin started.
     
  8. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

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    Yeah i remember them now, they came standard on lots of proflex bikes

    whatever happened to proflex?
     
  9. Alnamvet

    Alnamvet New Member

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    Proflex is now K2 bikes; interesting thing to note is that Girvin was really never in the "manfacturing" business...they market/promote products; they branded the Girven name on the forks, which were initially made in the US, then were farmed out to Taiwan manufacturers.
     
  10. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

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    oh yeah thats right

    I don't think you can get k2 stuff in australia anymore, do you remember the electronically damped proflex/k2?

    are we showing our age talking about this stuff?

    bclee, sorry for hijacking your thread!!
     
  11. Alnamvet

    Alnamvet New Member

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    Seeing as I'm older than dirt, I don't mind showing my age, but I must be developing Altsheimer's since I don't remember that item...hmmmmmmm....what are we talking about anyway???
     
  12. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

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    In 1997 proflex marketed a piezo electric speed sensitive damping system that was controlled by a computer in the rear shock and a girvin style fork. Basically a computer measured the rate of compression of the shock and then adjusted the damping valves 50 times a second to control the compression rate.

    The main idea was a supple fork at low speed/small bumps and a stiffer fork at high speed/big hit conditions. Its the same sort of thing SPV shocks are doing at the moment.

    Brilliant thinking and i'm sure it will make a comeback in a few years but....

    The problem was it cost a fortune and the sampling rate was too slow to adapt to the variable compression rate of MTB forks
     
  13. madhattr

    madhattr New Member

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    I was in contact with Proflex/K2 this past August and was told the elastomers are still available for $18 US.

    Here is a quote from his Email.

    "Michael Marceau (K2)" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Bob,
    >
    > We still have elastomers for this shock available. Part # 13943-2 [soft],
    > 13943-2H [medium], and 13943-2XH [hard] for the rear. Depending on the
    > rides weight. Part # 13943-2, and 13943-8 for the front. We can sell you
    > the elastomers by credit card order there are $18.00 each + shipping.
    >




    [I have a hard tail with a Girvin Vector 2 fork that I used to love, but of course by now the elastomers have turned to stone and I haven't been able to locate replacements for years. I can still get the upgrade non-elastomer shocks from later models, but they are quite expensive and the fork itself doesn't work as well as it used to.
     
  14. jpmacaroni

    jpmacaroni New Member

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    HI there!
    I am new to this forum and am looking for replacement elastomers for my Proflex Girvin Vector 2 shocks. Or this sounds good- Girvin Flex stem?! Please help.
    Thanks,
    Joan
    Santa Cruz, CA


     
  15. zippy172

    zippy172 New Member

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    Mad as it sounds... I'm still running around on a Pro-Flex 856 with Vector II forks :)

    Long gone are the shabby elastomers, replacements in the form of proper springs!! I was once told by someone you could rejuvenate rock hard elastomers by "cooking" them in a microwave over :| Suffice to say, they returned to a softish state for about a week, resulting in an even harder state afterwards...

    Did "The Wall" at Cwm Afan yesterday, people stopping and staring at my antique :p
     
  16. jpmacaroni

    jpmacaroni New Member

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    How do you replace the front elastomers???? I was able to replace the back ones, but cannot figure out how to take the front apart. I gave up and brought it to a bike shop who's owner used to be a Proflex rep. He said he would tell his mechanic how to do it- easy $25 labor cost. Now the bike has been there for a month and still they cannot figure it out. I would rather replace the fork- as I told them originally. Any suggestions???
     
  17. BikerTrash1130

    BikerTrash1130 New Member

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    Where, oh where can I find a spring for my Girvin fork?! My elastomers are frozen!
    You guys aren't showing your age, I am 26 and started riding in the early 90's. My bike is pure old school! Cannondale M800 Beast of the East with original Dart/Smoke tires, XT thumb shifters, DiaComp 990 rear brake, Girvin fork, Salsa barends, you get the idea. Anyone know what year it might be?
    http://pic10.picturetrail.com/VOL326/815976/1747806/20875473.jpg
     
  18. STaylor

    STaylor New Member

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    i am having a similar problem and i realize it is years after the post, but is there any way i could get my hands on one of those flex stems, would be greatly appreciated thanks.
     
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