What gets hot enough to melt plastic in the microwave?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Feb 19, 2005.

  1. I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    point of plastic.


    I have nuked food many times without burning a hole in the bowl. Not
    so this time.
     
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  2. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra <[email protected]> wrote in news:KatraMungBean-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    > > > sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    > > > point of plastic.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I have nuked food many times without burning a hole in the bowl. Not
    > > > so this time.
    > > >

    > >
    > > I have found that three things will melt plastic in the microwave:
    > >
    > > Tomatoes
    > > Sugar
    > > Most oils/fats (butter etc.)
    > >
    > > The oils are not as much of a problem as Tomato or Sugar,
    > >
    > > I've learned to use glass for both of those two!
    > >

    >
    > wild rice cooked till the water leaves does a number on the plastic too.


    oops! <lol>
    I've always cooked rice in the corningware, covered, so never
    experienced that. ;-)

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    As we go through life thinking heavy thoughts, thought particles
    tend to get caught between the ears causing truth decay- so be sure
    to use mental floss twice a day. -- Swami Beyondanada

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    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  3. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    > sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    > point of plastic.
    >


    What plastic? Plastics can have melting points from 180 to over 300
    degrees.
    Sugar and honey will go over 300 degrees. IIRC, sugar caramelizes at 338.
    That would easily melt a low grade plastic.
     
  4. Gabby

    Gabby Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    >> sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    >> point of plastic.
    >>

    >
    > What plastic? Plastics can have melting points from 180 to over 300
    > degrees.
    > Sugar and honey will go over 300 degrees. IIRC, sugar caramelizes at 338.
    > That would easily melt a low grade plastic.


    Even the Tupperware Crystalwave line which is marketed for 'reheating in
    microwave' will pit when there is a high sugar (or fat) content in the food
    being reheated unless you either reheat on low power or stir frequently to
    prevent hot spots.

    Gabby
     
  5. Top Spin

    Top Spin Guest

    On 19 Feb 2005 17:35:54 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    >sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    >point of plastic.
    >
    >
    >I have nuked food many times without burning a hole in the bowl. Not
    >so this time.


    Another important factor is whether it is liquid or solid. A liquid is
    much less likely to cause melting because the convection currents tend
    to move the hotter material around. Solids, because they cannot move,
    are far more likely to create local hot spots and burn, scortch, or
    melt.

    --
    Hitachi HB-A101 bread machine, 1 pound
    Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
    (01/10/05)
     
  6. --

    -- Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    > sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    > point of plastic.
    >
    >
    > I have nuked food many times without burning a hole in the bowl. Not
    > so this time.
    >


    anything
    1) that will reach the roughly 400 degrees at which plastic melts and
    2) has enough conductivity to deliver enough mass of heat to the bowl and
    3) is big enough to hold the heat above bowl melting before the bowl plastic
    can dissipate it

    - water goes no higher than 212 F or so: e.g., soups, veggies, etc don't
    get hot enough to melt plastic

    - oil goes over 400, so it can melt plastic: e.g., some meats are oily, and
    their fat will melt plastic.

    - a small spot of oil does not have enough mass to get enough heat in it
    fast enough that the bowl can't get spread that heat out quick enough not to
    melt at the spot. A larger amount of oil can get enough heat from the oven
    so that the bowl can't handle it, and melts the plastic
     
  7. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I was trying to make some popcorn balls. Two of the ingredients were
    > sugar and honey. One of these two heats to greater than the melting
    > point of plastic.
    >

    At the point of being a smarta**, I always use Pyrex bowls or microwave safe
    ceramic-type bowls in the microwave. The only time I use plastic is if I'm
    reheating soup (like at the office where I have to transport it with a
    tight-fitting lid). At home I tend to use the (non-plastic) bowl from which
    I plan to eat.

    Jill
     
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