What happened to KETO low carb products?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    products? I can't find them anywhere.

    jas3777
     
    Tags:


  2. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    :: Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    :: products? I can't find them anywhere.

    I think so....you can find them on closeout, iirc.
     
  3. Scionyx

    Scionyx Guest

    Looks like they are being reborn as Dyna Pure Nutrition. The website
    contains the story of what happened to KETO...
    http://www.dynapurenutrition.com

    -not affiliated

    Steve

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    > products? I can't find them anywhere.
    >
    > jas3777
    >
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    > products? I can't find them anywhere.
    >
    > jas3777
    >


    They went the way of the dinosaur...

    Overpriced and undermarketed.

    <sigh>
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  5. FOB

    FOB Guest

    Keto went out of business about a year ago, a victim of over enthusiastic
    expansion during the low carb craze. Two of its executives now run Dyna
    Pure but I see nothing on that site that indicates they are going to produce
    products similar to Keto's former line. Indeed, the products on the site
    look like another rip-off diet supplement.

    In news:[email protected],
    Scionyx <[email protected]> stated
    | Looks like they are being reborn as Dyna Pure Nutrition. The website
    | contains the story of what happened to KETO...
    | http://www.dynapurenutrition.com
    |
    | -not affiliated
    |
    | Steve
    |
    | <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | news:[email protected]
    || Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    || products? I can't find them anywhere.
    ||
    || jas3777
     
  6. Shakes and bars are how you got fat in the first place.

    --
    You take stupid to a new level. -- MFW


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    > products? I can't find them anywhere.
    >
    > jas3777
    >
     
  7. A.D.C.

    A.D.C. Guest

    i miss their ketocrumbs..made a good binder for meatloaf and a coating for
    catfish.
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    > products? I can't find them anywhere.
    >
    > jas3777
    >
     
  8. Scionyx

    Scionyx Guest

    I didn't study the products in detail, but though the Warp-9 shakes would be
    similar to the old KETO shakes. I have no idea about the comparison or
    number of flavors, etc.

    One of the 'executives', Pete Maletto, is credited with formulating over 200
    of the KETO products.

    Other than that, I make no claims, just answering "where they went."

    :)

    Steve

    "FOB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Keto went out of business about a year ago, a victim of over enthusiastic
    > expansion during the low carb craze. Two of its executives now run Dyna
    > Pure but I see nothing on that site that indicates they are going to
    > produce
    > products similar to Keto's former line. Indeed, the products on the site
    > look like another rip-off diet supplement.
    >
    > In news:[email protected],
    > Scionyx <[email protected]> stated
    > | Looks like they are being reborn as Dyna Pure Nutrition. The website
    > | contains the story of what happened to KETO...
    > | http://www.dynapurenutrition.com
    > |
    > | -not affiliated
    > |
    > | Steve
    > |
    > | <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > | news:[email protected]
    > || Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    > || products? I can't find them anywhere.
    > ||
    > || jas3777
    >
    >
     
  9. "Looks like they are being reborn as Dyna Pure Nutrition. The website
    contains the story of what happened to KETO...
    http://www.dynapurenutrition.com "

    Where on the website is the story of Keto? I couldn't find it.
     
  10. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

  11. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    I miss their Raspberry ice cream bars.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Have Keto products (shakes, bars, etc.) gone the way of Atkins
    > products? I can't find them anywhere.
    >
    > jas3777
    >
     
  12. Hannah Gruen

    Hannah Gruen Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > :> http://www.dynapurenutrition.com/keto.html
    >
    > Thanks for posting this link....I gave up looking.


    Ditto from me. It was interesting. It wasn't just a problem with waning of
    interest in lc, then. Although that played a part.

    I was just looking at a recipe yesterday in Cottage Living, wishing I had
    some of those Keto crumbs. Well, that's one of the easier products to
    duplicate, just one more step.

    HG
     
  13. Hannah Gruen wrote:
    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > :> http://www.dynapurenutrition.com/keto.html
    > >
    > > Thanks for posting this link....I gave up looking.

    >
    > Ditto from me. It was interesting. It wasn't just a problem with waning of
    > interest in lc, then. Although that played a part.


    It's an interesting story, this tale of fractured relationships and
    curious management decisions.

    I don't think the move to mass was the big mistake here. If the LC
    bubble turned out to be real, you have to be in the supermarket or you
    will have to find a better way to niche produce. But with 200 products,
    I don't think you're looking at a niche type of company. From the
    telling, they blew it on expanding too fast (Building leases, poor
    structure, bad expense management, etc).

    The big question, going forward, is this: Who owns all the
    formulations? If you think that the decline in LC interest is a
    temporary correction before a big J curve, you'd want them. I'm sure
    the new company would like them and could reform them (since the
    creative guy is there), but if Keto is in bankruptcy, has cash flow
    problems, but is still a concern, at least on paper, they probably own
    the formulations, leaving customers the poorer.

    FWIW, I think LC will be back en masse in the next 5-10 years.
    Something that works that well cannot help but find some entrepreneurs
    who will take em to market. I dunno that I'd go to town with the
    dynapure folks, since they started life as a MLM company and they ran
    Keto with so much vision and good business sense, but there is money to
    be made and the market abhors a vaccuum.

    -Hollywood, MBA
     
  14. Hannah Gruen wrote:
    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > :> http://www.dynapurenutrition.com/keto.html
    > >
    > > Thanks for posting this link....I gave up looking.

    >
    > Ditto from me. It was interesting. It wasn't just a problem with waning of
    > interest in lc, then. Although that played a part.


    It's an interesting story, this tale of fractured relationships and
    curious management decisions.

    I don't think the move to mass was the big mistake here. If the LC
    bubble turned out to be real, you have to be in the supermarket or you
    will have to find a better way to niche produce. But with 200 products,
    I don't think you're looking at a niche type of company. From the
    telling, they blew it on expanding too fast (Building leases, poor
    structure, bad expense management, etc).

    The big question, going forward, is this: Who owns all the
    formulations? If you think that the decline in LC interest is a
    temporary correction before a big J curve, you'd want them. I'm sure
    the new company would like them and could reform them (since the
    creative guy is there), but if Keto is in bankruptcy, has cash flow
    problems, but is still a concern, at least on paper, they probably own
    the formulations, leaving customers the poorer.

    FWIW, I think LC will be back en masse in the next 5-10 years.
    Something that works that well cannot help but find some entrepreneurs
    who will take em to market. I dunno that I'd go to town with the
    dynapure folks, since they started life as a MLM company and they ran
    Keto with so much vision and good business sense, but there is money to
    be made and the market abhors a vaccuum.

    -Hollywood, MBA
     
  15. Hannah Gruen

    Hannah Gruen Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > FWIW, I think LC will be back en masse in the next 5-10 years.
    > Something that works that well cannot help but find some entrepreneurs
    > who will take em to market. I dunno that I'd go to town with the
    > dynapure folks, since they started life as a MLM company and they ran
    > Keto with so much vision and good business sense, but there is money to
    > be made and the market abhors a vaccuum.


    Interesting, Max. I'd say I doubt that it will, at least not that soon, but
    that would be just a hunch. At least not ketogenic level lc. However, I
    agree with you to the extent that just like after the '70s Atkins craze
    bottomed out, a lot of current low carbers are going to continue on,
    providing a niche for reduced carb products. Also, something that wasn't
    present in the '70's, today's aging, diabetes-plagued population, is going
    to need to at least cut sugars and starches whether or not they "low carb."

    I guess what I think is going to happen is that there will continue to be a
    smallish market for these products. I regularly shop at a supermarket that
    gets a lot of senior citizens, and although some of the lc products have
    gone away, there are still a fair amount remaining on the shelves.
    Dreamfields pasta, for one - 3 different shapes.

    I'm no marketing expert, but my guess is that this kind of market is going
    to be most profitably served by the same kind of companies that were around
    before Atkins Reloaded came along. Namely, small firms that sell mostly to
    health food stores and/or by mail order, with some grocery outlets where
    interest is strongest, which tends to be in places like Florida where there
    is a relatively large elderly population. I remember back pre-Atkins2, when
    this ng was new, and people in some parts of Florida could buy lc bakery
    items and frozen desserts locally that were unavailable in most of the rest
    of the country. I think Expert Foods is still doing OK, still a small niche
    marketer, mostly internet sales (?), for instance, and they will likely
    continue to do so bar mismanagement.

    That's my guess, anyhow.

    HG
     
  16. "i miss their ketocrumbs..made a good binder for meatloaf and a coating
    for
    catfish"

    Some are still being sold on Ebay.
     
  17. I'll give you my reasoning, and you can agree or disagree.
    The main reason I think it will come back within 10 years (so I guess
    that's big by 2014), is that rends in dieting are advancing at a faster
    rate. If you look at waves of LC, you have the 1900 growth, you have
    the 70's spurt and the late early 2000 growth. Everything else is
    accelerating, trend wise, and with a faster media (not necessarily a
    better one), more outlets, and wider distribution for knowledge, it
    seems that something as efficacious as LC will be back sooner rather
    than later. Almost definitely by 2020, but I think sooner than that.

    Diet fashions, like everything else in knowledge and trends, work on a
    pattern like a network externality. A classic example is the format of
    stuff in a record store or at Blockbuster. When BB started, it was all
    VHS, no laser disc, and no DVD (due to lack of invention). Why? Because
    everyone had VHS, a few folks (but not enough) had Laser, and no one
    had DVD. Eventually, DVD comes along. It takes a while for BB to invest
    in DVD. Part of that is a lack of titles, but a larger part was lack of
    installed players. Eventually a critical mass of customers get players,
    BB puts in a DVD section. As time goes by, and DVD moves beyond early
    adapters and tech friendlies, the DVD section grows. Now, when my
    in-laws have a DVD player, my local BB has a small VHS section, and
    almost everything else is DVD. When the next thing comes along, we will
    see the same progression.

    How does this relate back to diets and information? There are a ton of
    "installed bases" that work for diets. The medical community is one. I
    started LC because my best friend, a doctor, suggested it. The younger
    docs coming up are more LC friendly, as it is closer to establishment
    science while they are in med school. As the installed base of LC
    friendly docs increases, more people do LC. The more people, the
    greater the demand for products. And then it moves to mass, like we saw
    in 2003. I think it was early at that time. The mass CP companies were
    cost-benefiting a paradigm shift and so they jumped in. The companies
    like Keto had first mover advantage, but only if they moved. It was
    early, but I think only by 10 years, as the science moves faster and
    more studies support LC. The big thing from the 2005 shakeout is this:
    the big CP companies didn't bet the farm on LC, so they will be back.
    Maybe they withdraw a product now, but it's still in the library of
    stuff they own, so it can come back when the time is right. The niche
    companies, like KETO, did bet the farm, and so whether they will be
    ready or able to meet the next opportunity is in doubt. If I had the
    $$'s and the drive to be an entrepreneur, I'd look into buying the KETO
    library and bringing it to market. Maybe some of my B-school friends
    are looking for a venture. I dunno.

    Niche only takes you so far, and when the mass market moves in, you
    have to adapt. LC luxury is maybe one way to go when the mass comes in.
    But you have to do something to justify the higher prices and lower
    availability that being internet only/health food stores entail. Expert
    Foods is a great example. They offer stuff that you really cannot
    easily duplicate with mass products. They will survive, until everyone
    quits LC. Since LC works, I don't see that.

    -Hollywood, who will admit to being a top line consultant rather than a
    bottom liner, which entails certain views about how full the glass is.

    Hannah Gruen wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > FWIW, I think LC will be back en masse in the next 5-10 years.
    > > Something that works that well cannot help but find some entrepreneurs
    > > who will take em to market. I dunno that I'd go to town with the
    > > dynapure folks, since they started life as a MLM company and they ran
    > > Keto with so much vision and good business sense, but there is money to
    > > be made and the market abhors a vaccuum.

    >
    > Interesting, Max. I'd say I doubt that it will, at least not that soon, but
    > that would be just a hunch. At least not ketogenic level lc. However, I
    > agree with you to the extent that just like after the '70s Atkins craze
    > bottomed out, a lot of current low carbers are going to continue on,
    > providing a niche for reduced carb products. Also, something that wasn't
    > present in the '70's, today's aging, diabetes-plagued population, is going
    > to need to at least cut sugars and starches whether or not they "low carb."
    >
    > I guess what I think is going to happen is that there will continue to be a
    > smallish market for these products. I regularly shop at a supermarket that
    > gets a lot of senior citizens, and although some of the lc products have
    > gone away, there are still a fair amount remaining on the shelves.
    > Dreamfields pasta, for one - 3 different shapes.
    >
    > I'm no marketing expert, but my guess is that this kind of market is going
    > to be most profitably served by the same kind of companies that were around
    > before Atkins Reloaded came along. Namely, small firms that sell mostly to
    > health food stores and/or by mail order, with some grocery outlets where
    > interest is strongest, which tends to be in places like Florida where there
    > is a relatively large elderly population. I remember back pre-Atkins2, when
    > this ng was new, and people in some parts of Florida could buy lc bakery
    > items and frozen desserts locally that were unavailable in most of the rest
    > of the country. I think Expert Foods is still doing OK, still a small niche
    > marketer, mostly internet sales (?), for instance, and they will likely
    > continue to do so bar mismanagement.
    >
    > That's my guess, anyhow.
    >
    > HG
     
  18. Hannah Gruen

    Hannah Gruen Guest

    Max, you may well be right. There are a lot of competing interests, so to
    speak, and who knows what will win out. I like your point about younger
    doctors being more lc-friendly. But I get the sense that there is a lot of
    media push to get the general population on a largely carb diet. Cheaper and
    more profit? Fears that that is the only kind of diet that will sustain a
    burgeoning world population? Heavy consumption of animal foods once again
    seems "politically incorrect" these days, from what you see/hear in many
    media outlets.

    Countering all that is the fact that an aging population just can't continue
    its high-carb & high calorie ways without a real health crisis looming on
    the horizon.

    However, it's not clear to me that most people make diet decisions based on
    objective data, but rather on what's in fashion and being touted in the
    media and to a lesser extent what is being recommended by their health care
    provider. So my guess is that the outcome is going to be based largely on
    what the media does, and I'm certainly not clear on why they do what they
    do.

    HG

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'll give you my reasoning, and you can agree or disagree.
    > The main reason I think it will come back within 10 years (so I guess
    > that's big by 2014), is that rends in dieting are advancing at a faster
    > rate. If you look at waves of LC, you have the 1900 growth, you have
    > the 70's spurt and the late early 2000 growth. Everything else is
    > accelerating, trend wise, and with a faster media (not necessarily a
    > better one), more outlets, and wider distribution for knowledge, it
    > seems that something as efficacious as LC will be back sooner rather
    > than later. Almost definitely by 2020, but I think sooner than that.
    >
    > Diet fashions, like everything else in knowledge and trends, work on a
    > pattern like a network externality. A classic example is the format of
    > stuff in a record store or at Blockbuster. When BB started, it was all
    > VHS, no laser disc, and no DVD (due to lack of invention). Why? Because
    > everyone had VHS, a few folks (but not enough) had Laser, and no one
    > had DVD. Eventually, DVD comes along. It takes a while for BB to invest
    > in DVD. Part of that is a lack of titles, but a larger part was lack of
    > installed players. Eventually a critical mass of customers get players,
    > BB puts in a DVD section. As time goes by, and DVD moves beyond early
    > adapters and tech friendlies, the DVD section grows. Now, when my
    > in-laws have a DVD player, my local BB has a small VHS section, and
    > almost everything else is DVD. When the next thing comes along, we will
    > see the same progression.
    >
    > How does this relate back to diets and information? There are a ton of
    > "installed bases" that work for diets. The medical community is one. I
    > started LC because my best friend, a doctor, suggested it. The younger
    > docs coming up are more LC friendly, as it is closer to establishment
    > science while they are in med school. As the installed base of LC
    > friendly docs increases, more people do LC. The more people, the
    > greater the demand for products. And then it moves to mass, like we saw
    > in 2003. I think it was early at that time. The mass CP companies were
    > cost-benefiting a paradigm shift and so they jumped in. The companies
    > like Keto had first mover advantage, but only if they moved. It was
    > early, but I think only by 10 years, as the science moves faster and
    > more studies support LC. The big thing from the 2005 shakeout is this:
    > the big CP companies didn't bet the farm on LC, so they will be back.
    > Maybe they withdraw a product now, but it's still in the library of
    > stuff they own, so it can come back when the time is right. The niche
    > companies, like KETO, did bet the farm, and so whether they will be
    > ready or able to meet the next opportunity is in doubt. If I had the
    > $$'s and the drive to be an entrepreneur, I'd look into buying the KETO
    > library and bringing it to market. Maybe some of my B-school friends
    > are looking for a venture. I dunno.
    >
    > Niche only takes you so far, and when the mass market moves in, you
    > have to adapt. LC luxury is maybe one way to go when the mass comes in.
    > But you have to do something to justify the higher prices and lower
    > availability that being internet only/health food stores entail. Expert
    > Foods is a great example. They offer stuff that you really cannot
    > easily duplicate with mass products. They will survive, until everyone
    > quits LC. Since LC works, I don't see that.
    >
    > -Hollywood, who will admit to being a top line consultant rather than a
    > bottom liner, which entails certain views about how full the glass is.
    >
     
  19. FOB

    FOB Guest

    I think the media just pushes what they get from the medical establishment.
    They listen to dieticians who are almost all still low fat pushers. They
    take the PCRM seriously and do lots of promos for them. The media is all
    too happy to have a nice ready made story plop into their lazy laps. Makes
    it easy for those pushing a point of view to get air time. The PCRM gives
    awards to schools serving their version of healthy lunches. One of our
    stations has a weekly segment on their news with Florine Mark of Weight
    Watchers--she's a local minor celeb.

    Actually, I think the recent low carb frenzy hurt the low carb cause.
    Because so many latched onto it without actually understanding it and doing
    it correctly, a lot of people got a bad impression of low carb in general.
    I think the medical community will gradually come to view low carb as a
    positive thing because the research that supports it is showing up, but it
    will take a long time, several years at least.


    In news:[email protected],
    Hannah Gruen <[email protected]> stated
    | Max, you may well be right. There are a lot of competing interests,
    | so to speak, and who knows what will win out. I like your point about
    | younger doctors being more lc-friendly. But I get the sense that
    | there is a lot of media push to get the general population on a
    | largely carb diet. Cheaper and more profit? Fears that that is the
    | only kind of diet that will sustain a burgeoning world population?
    | Heavy consumption of animal foods once again seems "politically
    | incorrect" these days, from what you see/hear in many media outlets.
    |
    | Countering all that is the fact that an aging population just can't
    | continue its high-carb & high calorie ways without a real health
    | crisis looming on the horizon.
    |
    | However, it's not clear to me that most people make diet decisions
    | based on objective data, but rather on what's in fashion and being
    | touted in the media and to a lesser extent what is being recommended
    | by their health care provider. So my guess is that the outcome is
    | going to be based largely on what the media does, and I'm certainly
    | not clear on why they do what they do.
    |
    | HG
    |
     
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