What happened to the old ways?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Bb, Aug 16, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bb

    Bb Guest

    A few days ago, we were riding in a local park (in the metro area) and one of my group had a major
    stroke of bad luck - at least two punctures in the front tire on a steep downhill. He tried to
    maintain control, but dropped into a gully which led to a 6-8 foot deep drainage ditch. He was
    shaken, but not too damaged (all things considered).

    About that time a bunch from the local mountain bike group came by, in pods of 2-3. We hadn't
    started replacing the tube yet, so they didn't know if we had every thing we needed. Almost all of
    them blew right past, until finally someone in the back asked if everything was OK and we had
    everything we needed.

    Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    like we weren't even there. When did that change?

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    BB <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 130844.news.uni-berlin.de:
    > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    > needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    > like we weren't even there. When did that change?

    I always ask if an individual is in trouble. If there is a group, however, and they don't look like
    super hopeless types, I usually assume that they're taking care of themselves.
     
  3. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    Ken wrote:

    > BB <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 130844.news.uni-berlin.de:
    >
    >>Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    >>needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    >>like we weren't even there. When did that change?
    >
    >
    > I always ask if an individual is in trouble. If there is a group, however, and they don't look
    > like super hopeless types, I usually assume that they're taking care of themselves.

    Group or individual, I still ask if everything's okay, or if they've got everything they
    need. Although usually if it's a group, and they've already figured out that everything is
    NOT okay, or that they don't have everything they need, there's one or more practical souls
    who are obviously standing lookout, "Uh, hey, excuse me..." I've lent tools or a pump a
    couple of times, and a couple of times it was just the use of a cell phone so somebody at
    home wouldn't worry.

    Kathleen
     
  4. Jd

    Jd Guest

    BB <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... <snip sign-o-the times>
    > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    > needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    > like we weren't even there. When did that change?

    When mountain biking became "stylish". Trendoids will never have a clue, no matter what
    sport/lifestyle they decide to invade.

    JD
     
  5. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    >needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    >like we weren't even there. When did that change?

    Hasn't changed in the confines of my (very limited) exposure - but I'd expect it to as volume
    increases.

    There's what I think of as a "tribal thing" with a lot of pursuits. I've seen it in VW bug
    ownership, board surfing windsurfing, kitesurfing, riding road bikes, riding motor scooters, and
    mountain biking. Everybody waves to the other guy and people stop to exchange stories with strangers
    on a regular basis.

    Probably something like that going on with Mini-Cooper owners right now...

    The universe of like-minded people is pared down to the point where you're glad to see the
    other guy.

    Back in the upper pleistoscene, that was probably true with just people in general. But as the
    numbers increase beyond some hardwired limit, people tend to deal with the others less-and-less as
    people and more-and-more as objects.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. Pete Cresswell says:

    >Probably something like that going on with Mini-Cooper owners right now...

    Has always been something like that going on with Mini-Cooper owners. The MINI Cooper owners,
    however, know that what they are driving is just a re-shaped baby Bimmer with no soul, so they don't
    care..........

    Steve "C for Curmudgeon" Baker
     
  7. Ellis

    Ellis Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A few days ago, we were riding in a local park (in the metro area) and one of my group had a major
    > stroke of bad luck - at least two punctures in the front tire on a steep downhill. He tried to
    > maintain control, but dropped into a gully which led to a 6-8 foot deep drainage ditch. He was
    > shaken, but not too damaged (all things considered).
    >
    > About that time a bunch from the local mountain bike group came by, in pods of 2-3. We hadn't
    > started replacing the tube yet, so they didn't know if we had every thing we needed. Almost all of
    > them blew right past, until finally someone in the back asked if everything was OK and we had
    > everything we needed.
    >
    > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    > needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    > like we weren't even there. When did that change?
    >
    > --
    > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)

    I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH bike, you can afford to buy &
    carry some tools. Here come the flames.
     
  8. ellis says:

    >I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH bike, you can afford to buy &
    >carry some tools.

    Then I'm only going to help rigid riders (I'll include SSers in that) coz my bike only cost $300,
    and since almost everyone else has a bike more expensive than mine, thay should pack some tools
    and spares.

    Are you seriously implying that THAT is your attitude on life?

    Sad.........
     
  9. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 18:18:36 GMT, ellis wrote:

    > I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH bike, you can afford to buy
    > & carry some tools. Here come the flames.

    You're kidding, right?

    From what I've seen, the reason people don't have a certain tool isn't because they couldn't afford
    it, but because they just didn't think of it or just made some mistake. One time I went riding after
    I'd run out of patches. I didn't worry about it, because I had a spare tube & my bud would have
    something as well.

    I got two flats that ride. My riding bud didn't bring his tube & patches because I always had some.

    Things happen.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  10. Ellis

    Ellis Guest

    "Stephen Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ellis says:
    >
    > >I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH
    bike,
    > >you can afford to buy & carry some tools.
    >
    > Then I'm only going to help rigid riders (I'll include SSers in that) coz
    my
    > bike only cost $300, and since almost everyone else has a bike more
    expensive
    > than mine, thay should pack some tools and spares.
    >
    > Are you seriously implying that THAT is your attitude on life?
    >
    > Sad.........

    Oh, I forgot to say that I only stop for Ibis bikes, because I want one.

    Lighten up.
     
  11. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    "ellis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:0GP%[email protected]...
    >
    > "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > A few days ago, we were riding in a local park (in the metro area) and
    one
    > > of my group had a major stroke of bad luck - at least two punctures in
    the
    > > front tire on a steep downhill. He tried to maintain control, but
    dropped
    > > into a gully which led to a 6-8 foot deep drainage ditch. He was shaken, but not too damaged
    > > (all things considered).
    > >
    > > About that time a bunch from the local mountain bike group came by, in pods of 2-3. We hadn't
    > > started replacing the tube yet, so they didn't
    know
    > > if we had every thing we needed. Almost all of them blew right past,
    until
    > > finally someone in the back asked if everything was OK and we had everything we needed.
    > >
    > > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything
    > > they needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would
    > > just act like we weren't even there. When did that change?
    > >
    > > --
    > > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
    >
    > I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH
    bike,
    > you can afford to buy & carry some tools. Here come the flames.
    >
    >

    what about XC FS?

    Penny
     
  12. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "ellis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:0GP%[email protected]...
    >
    > "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...

    <snip a bit>
    > >
    > > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything
    > > they needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would
    > > just act like we weren't even there. When did that change?
    > >
    > > --
    > > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
    >
    > I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH
    bike,
    > you can afford to buy & carry some tools. Here come the flames.
    >

    Why you little stuck up elitist mother f...hehehehe...can't do it. You're right and I do. ;^)

    Mike
     
  13. Ellis

    Ellis Guest

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "ellis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:0GP%[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > A few days ago, we were riding in a local park (in the metro area) and
    > one
    > > > of my group had a major stroke of bad luck - at least two punctures in
    > the
    > > > front tire on a steep downhill. He tried to maintain control, but
    > dropped
    > > > into a gully which led to a 6-8 foot deep drainage ditch. He was
    shaken,
    > > > but not too damaged (all things considered).
    > > >
    > > > About that time a bunch from the local mountain bike group came by, in pods of 2-3. We hadn't
    > > > started replacing the tube yet, so they didn't
    > know
    > > > if we had every thing we needed. Almost all of them blew right past,
    > until
    > > > finally someone in the back asked if everything was OK and we had everything we needed.
    > > >
    > > > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK
    and/or
    > > > they had everything they needed. I still do. It really surprised me
    that
    > > > this organized group (all but one) would just act like we weren't even there. When did that
    > > > change?
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
    > >
    > > I only stop to help HT XC riders. If you can afford to rig a $5000 DH
    > bike,
    > > you can afford to buy & carry some tools. Here come the flames.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > what about XC FS?
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >

    Only if it's yours and you have a spare Clif Bar for me.
     
  14. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On 17 Aug 2003 00:11:09 GMT, BB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    >needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    >like we weren't even there. When did that change?

    Hasn't changed here. Sorry thing is I've gotten the old "Feck Off" look by some just for offering
    assistance. That still doesn't stop me from offering though.

    Peace, Bill(my dads got an awesome set of tools)Wheeler

    The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind should give
    an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  15. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Bill Wheeler wrote:

    > On 17 Aug 2003 00:11:09 GMT, BB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    >>needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    >>like we weren't even there. When did that change?
    >
    >
    > Hasn't changed here. Sorry thing is I've gotten the old "Feck Off" look by some just for offering
    > assistance. That still doesn't stop me from offering though.

    And then there was the 2 older ladies walking their bikes looking very embarassed. I hesitate to ask
    someone walking unless I can see something obvious because I hate to embarass them further by making
    them admit that they're just too tired to ride. Turns out that some bike mechanic hadn't tightened
    the seat adjusters sufficiently and the seat on one of their bikes wasn't usable. 2 minutes later
    and they were thanking me profusely :).

    David
     
  16. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    BB <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Used to be, it was typical for MTBers to ask if everything was OK and/or they had everything they
    > needed. I still do. It really surprised me that this organized group (all but one) would just act
    > like we weren't even there. When did that change?

    MTB'ers, roadies, MC'ists, drivers - I see any one of 'em looks like they have a mechanical, I ask
    if they're OK or need a hand. Even a parent pushing a busted pram. I get the same in return for the
    most part. Even had a guy pull up in his little shiny new Audi when I had a puncture on the filthy
    old beater - asked meif I wanted a lift for me and the bike - cut up into crumbs you couldn't have
    poured us both into that car, but I appreciated the stop-and-offer.

    Oh, reminds me - on my way home from work the other day, guy wearing all new roadie gear, shiny
    mirror shades, expensive 'looking' lycra, bright yellow costly CF road 'thing', walking his bike up
    one of the hills (not long, not too steep). Thought he had a mechanical, offered help, he just
    smiled and said 'no, I'm fine'. 2 days later, I saw him again pushing up the same hill, then Kath
    tells me she saw him in the town pushing along a flat path - WTF is that all about? ',;~}~

    Shaun aRe
     
  17. On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:14:39 +0100, Shaun Rimmer <[email protected]> penned:
    >
    <snip>
    >
    > Oh, reminds me - on my way home from work the other day, guy wearing all new roadie gear, shiny
    > mirror shades, expensive 'looking' lycra, bright yellow costly CF road 'thing', walking his bike
    > up one of the hills (not long, not too steep). Thought he had a mechanical, offered help, he just
    > smiled and said 'no, I'm fine'. 2 days later, I saw him again pushing up the same hill, then Kath
    > tells me she saw him in the town pushing along a flat path - WTF is that all about? ',;~}~
    >
    > Shaun aRe

    Hey now, minus the gender, that coulda been me ... (except I don't know what a costly CF road
    'thing' is ... a bike, I'm guessing)

    At least the guy keeps trying, right? One of these days he'll get it. Long and steep are in the eye
    of the beholder, especially when you're just starting out. On my very first ride I managed to go up
    and down all sorts of stuff, even did some fairly technical singletrack ... but finally, my body
    just gave out. On the way back, I walked my bike up an incline that your average observer would
    probably swear was a flat. I just didn't have anything left anymore ...

    --
    monique
     
  18. "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > Oh, reminds me - on my way home from work the other day, guy wearing all new roadie gear, shiny
    > mirror shades, expensive 'looking' lycra, bright yellow costly CF road 'thing', walking his bike
    > up one of the hills (not long, not too steep). Thought he had a mechanical, offered help, he just
    > smiled and said 'no, I'm fine'. 2 days later, I saw him again pushing up the same hill, then Kath
    > tells me she saw him in the town pushing along a flat path - WTF is that all about? ',;~}~

    Roadies can't climb. As for the flat path thing, he perhaps momentarily thought about climbing, and
    had to get off the bike to work out the anxiety.

    I've seen it before.

    CC
     
  19. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Monique Y. Herman wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:14:39 +0100, Shaun Rimmer <[email protected]> penned:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>Oh, reminds me - on my way home from work the other day, guy wearing all new roadie gear, shiny
    >>mirror shades, expensive 'looking' lycra, bright yellow costly CF road 'thing', walking his bike
    >>up one of the hills (not long, not too steep). Thought he had a mechanical, offered help, he just
    >>smiled and said 'no, I'm fine'. 2 days later, I saw him again pushing up the same hill, then Kath
    >>tells me she saw him in the town pushing along a flat path - WTF is that all about? ',;~}~
    >>
    >>Shaun aRe
    >
    >
    > Hey now, minus the gender, that coulda been me ... (except I don't know what a costly CF road
    > 'thing' is ... a bike, I'm guessing)

    Carbon-fiber is my guess.

    My ex-boss, a nice guy but not a very good boss, decided to run marathons last year, and has
    completed three so far. This year's new thing was triathlons, so he bought a new "CF road thing" and
    asked to borrow some road racing videos I had. He was bummed about how hard hills were and talked
    about having to walk up the slightest little incline. I can't relate because I've been doing that
    kind of thing for many years, but it was very enlightening to hear.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  20. Jimbo(san)

    Jimbo(san) New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2003
    Messages:
    302
    Likes Received:
    0
    <Originally posted by Corvus Corvax

    Roadies can't climb. As for the flat path thing, he perhaps momentarily thought about climbing, and
    had to get off the bike to work out the anxiety.

    I've seen it before.

    CC >

    Yeah I just had a whole converstaion with this Gilberto Simoni guy who tells me that Jan Ullrich really is a slow climber ... but then again Stephano Garzelli said the same thing about Simoni...
    You're right Roadies don't climb well.

    Jimbo(san)
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...