What I need in a truing stand

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Risto Varanka, Apr 14, 2003.

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  1. Think every wheel has to be trued every few thousand (hundred?) kilos...

    Been a while since I did anything on my upright. I'm expecting to ride 1000 to 10000 km a year,
    with multiple bikes. Wheel sizes between 16" and 28". Could do some truing for friends and
    relatives. Learn to be more self-sufficient as comes to cycling. Maybe I could even try wheel
    building some day.

    Do I need a truing stand? I'd think it's useful for making a precious job conveniently (forget
    about quick with me...). Which features should I look for? 100 or even 50 eurodollars would buy me
    plenty, I guess?

    Suggestions for models and webstores are welcome too... As well as pointers to already available
    information sources, I've been reading some old threads from this group, could do more of that.

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
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  2. [email protected] wrote:

    > Do I need a truing stand? I'd think it's useful for making a precious job conveniently (forget
    > about quick with me...). Which features should I look for? 100 or even 50 eurodollars would buy me
    > plenty, I guess?

    My guess is that the "shop-quality" stands are essentially sturdier and perhaps with more accurate
    feelers for lateral and radial truing. However, even the cheap stands seem to get the job done just
    fine, for example the Tacx Exact (third from the top):

    http://www.aggio.fi/cgi-bin/navig2000.cgi?naytaryhma=121

    "Shop-quality" stands are probably a logical investment if you build a lot of wheels, but
    probably not worth the expense for the hobbyist. The only minor annoyance I've experienced with
    Tacx Exact I've experienced is the feeler for radial trueness, which is a bit difficult to adjust
    in small amounts.

    You might also want to invest in a dishing tool, like the Tacx T4585 shown on the following page:

    http://www.tacx.nl/content.cfm?l=en&id=32206

    I built my first set of wheels with these tools and they came out just fine. They've remained true
    well within 1 mm after the first 3000 kilometres of use. Good instructions are a must, and for that
    purpose Jobst's book is the best choice available.

    -as
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Think every wheel has to be trued every few thousand (hundred?) kilos...
    >
    > Been a while since I did anything on my upright. I'm expecting to ride 1000 to 10000 km a year,
    > with multiple bikes. Wheel sizes between 16" and 28". Could do some truing for friends and
    > relatives. Learn to be more self-sufficient as comes to cycling. Maybe I could even try wheel
    > building some day.
    >
    > Do I need a truing stand? I'd think it's useful for making a precious job conveniently (forget
    > about quick with me...). Which features should I look for? 100 or even 50 eurodollars would buy me
    > plenty, I guess?
    >
    > Suggestions for models and webstores are welcome too... As well as pointers to already available
    > information sources, I've been reading some old threads from this group, could do more of that.
    >
    > --
    > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi

    I've been using the same cheap ass Minoura (I think, no logos) for the last 8 years or so. It isn't
    even straight, but has adjustable threaded "feelers" so it doesn't really matter. Combined with a
    Park dishing tool, this cheap stand has built many wheels with no problems.

    As an added bonus, it folds flat for storage.

    I've been tempted to upgrade to the Park TS-2, but the $125 keeps putting me off.

    Ditto with the workstand...

    "Dr." Mike's prescription: buy an inexpensive truing stand till you figure out whether you're
    going to build enough wheels to make the more expensive one worth it. Make sure that you buy a
    dishing tool!

    Mike
     
  4. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    this stand is great, the ability to move the feelers in by miniscule amounts by turning the 'feeler
    knobs' is agreat feature. If its not sturdy enough for you, simply bolt it to your workstand with a
    single bolt.

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:6%[email protected]...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Think every wheel has to be trued every few thousand (hundred?) kilos...
    > >
    > > Been a while since I did anything on my upright. I'm expecting to ride 1000 to 10000 km a year,
    > > with multiple bikes. Wheel sizes between 16" and 28". Could do some truing for friends and
    > > relatives. Learn to be more self-sufficient as comes to cycling. Maybe I could even try wheel
    > > building some day.
    > >
    > > Do I need a truing stand? I'd think it's useful for making a precious job conveniently (forget
    > > about quick with me...). Which features should I look for? 100 or even 50 eurodollars would buy
    > > me plenty, I guess?
    > >
    > > Suggestions for models and webstores are welcome too... As well as pointers to already available
    > > information sources, I've been reading some old threads from this group, could do more of that.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
    >
    > I've been using the same cheap ass Minoura (I think, no logos) for the
    last
    > 8 years or so. It isn't even straight, but has adjustable threaded "feelers" so it doesn't really
    > matter. Combined with a Park dishing tool, this cheap stand has built many wheels with no
    > problems.
    >
    > As an added bonus, it folds flat for storage.
    >
    > I've been tempted to upgrade to the Park TS-2, but the $125 keeps putting
    me
    > off.
    >
    > Ditto with the workstand...
    >
    > "Dr." Mike's prescription: buy an inexpensive truing stand till you figure out whether you're
    > going to build enough wheels to make the more expensive one worth it. Make sure that you buy a
    > dishing tool!
    >
    > Mike
     
  5. Hedberg

    Hedberg Guest

    On 14 Apr 2003 21:27:24 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >Think every wheel has to be trued every few thousand (hundred?) kilos...
    >
    >Been a while since I did anything on my upright. I'm expecting to ride 1000 to 10000 km a year,
    >with multiple bikes. Wheel sizes between 16" and 28". Could do some truing for friends and
    >relatives. Learn to be more self-sufficient as comes to cycling. Maybe I could even try wheel
    >building some day.
    >
    >Do I need a truing stand? I'd think it's useful for making a precious job conveniently (forget
    >about quick with me...). Which features should I look for? 100 or even 50 eurodollars would buy me
    >plenty, I guess?
    >
    >Suggestions for models and webstores are welcome too... As well as pointers to already available
    >information sources, I've been reading some old threads from this group, could do more of that.

    My experience may be different from some of the others here. Many years ago I bought a cheap assed
    Park truing stand. I believe it was called the "Park Consumer" truing stand. At the time it was
    either this one or the "Park Professional". I don't like it mostly because of the way that the axle
    is set laterally in the supports -- little fixtures that you slide and clamp. The problem is getting
    the axle centered -- it's neither obvious nor easy. What I ended up doing was fixing one end firmly
    and then frequently reversing the axle in the fixture -- the rim should have the same position
    reference to the rim feeler if everything is balanced.

    I've had similar experiences with other inexpensive tools that I've bought over the years. Bicycle
    tools and other tools too. I guess when it comes down to it, I hate cheap tools.

    Harold
     
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