What is "Pho Hanoi" - Vietnam food

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Feb 8, 2006.

  1. "Pho Hanoi" is one of the most famous and favorite food of Vietnamese.
    It is made from "banh pho", some pieces of beff, hot soup water and
    special spices: onion, garlic ...
    "Banh pho" is a food made by embed rice flour into boiled water.
    "Pho Hanoi" has a special state the not like any food else all over the
    world, it's very very Vietnam.
    Here are some address that you may enjoy "Pho Hanoi" in Hanoi:
    - Pho Ga (32 Le Van Huu)- Famous for very good Hanoi pho (chicken
    noodle soup), a bowl costs $0.73 and is a filling breakfast or lunch.
    There are air conditioned rooms upstairs.
    - "Pho 24" - Ba Triêu Street - one of the series "pho" restaurants of
    Trade mark "Pho 24".

    -------------------------------------------------------
    Le Do - Vietnam Travel Assistant
    [email protected]
    Dong Da Dist, Ha noi, Vietnam
    Tel: +849 830 - 34212
    Fax: +844 563 - 9873
    Explore Vietnam Life - Visit: www.waytovietnam.com
     
    Tags:


  2. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > "Pho Hanoi" is one of the most famous and favorite food of Vietnamese.
    > It is made from "banh pho", some pieces of beff, hot soup water and
    > special spices: onion, garlic ...
    > "Banh pho" is a food made by embed rice flour into boiled water.
    > "Pho Hanoi" has a special state the not like any food else all over
    > the world, it's very very Vietnam.
    > Here are some address that you may enjoy "Pho Hanoi" in Hanoi:
    > - Pho Ga (32 Le Van Huu)- Famous for very good Hanoi pho (chicken
    > noodle soup), a bowl costs $0.73 and is a filling breakfast or lunch.
    > There are air conditioned rooms upstairs.
    > - "Pho 24" - Ba Triêu Street - one of the series "pho" restaurants of
    > Trade mark "Pho 24".


    Qhya long, ka?
     
  3. tiberius

    tiberius Guest

    On 8 Feb 2006 00:12:42 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >"Pho Hanoi" is one of the most famous and favorite food of Vietnamese.
    >It is made from "banh pho", some pieces of beff, hot soup water and
    >special spices: onion, garlic ...
    >"Banh pho" is a food made by embed rice flour into boiled water.
    >"Pho Hanoi" has a special state the not like any food else all over the
    >world, it's very very Vietnam.
    >Here are some address that you may enjoy "Pho Hanoi" in Hanoi:
    >- Pho Ga (32 Le Van Huu)- Famous for very good Hanoi pho (chicken
    >noodle soup), a bowl costs $0.73 and is a filling breakfast or lunch.
    >There are air conditioned rooms upstairs.
    >- "Pho 24" - Ba Triêu Street - one of the series "pho" restaurants of
    >Trade mark "Pho 24".
    >
    >-------------------------------------------------------
    >Le Do - Vietnam Travel Assistant
    >[email protected]
    >Dong Da Dist, Ha noi, Vietnam
    >Tel: +849 830 - 34212
    >Fax: +844 563 - 9873
    >Explore Vietnam Life - Visit: www.waytovietnam.com



    Seventy-three cents?!?! Damned.....you can't even get a small order
    of fries for that here in the U.S.

    Any ideas how much this would cost to make, per serving, in the U.S.?
    Certainly more than seventy-three cents, eh?

    Anyway...compliments of Gourmet Magazine via The Food Network website.



    Pho Bo (Hanoi Beef Noodle Soup)


    6 cups beef broth
    1 (1/4-inch thick) slice ginger
    2 whole star anise*
    1 cinnamon stick
    1/2 pound piece boneless beef sirloin, trimmed of any fat
    3 ounces dried flat rice noodles*
    1/4 cup Asian fish sauce*
    1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1 cup fresh bean sprouts, rinsed and drained
    1/8 cup minced scallions
    1/4 cup fresh cilantro sprigs, washed and finely chopped
    1 small thin fresh red or green Asian chilie, sliced very thin
    1/2 cup fresh basil leaves
    Lime wedges for garnish
    *Available at Asian Markets

    In a 2 quart saucepan bring broth, ginger, star anise, and cinnamon to
    a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
    With a very sharp knife cut sirloin across the grain into very thin
    slices.
    In a large bowl soak noodles in hot water to cover 15 minutes, or
    until softened and pliable.
    While noodles are soaking, bring a kettle of salted water to a boil
    for noodles. Drain noodles in a colander and cook in boiling water,
    stirring 45 seconds, or until tender. Drain noodles in a colander. Set
    aside.
    Strain broth into saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir in fish sauce,
    salt and pepper. Add sirloin and sprouts and cook 30 to 45 seconds, or
    until sirloin changes color. Skim any froth from soup.
    To serve, divide noodles into 4 bowls. Ladle soup over noodles.
    Sprinkle scallion greens, cilantro, chilies and basil over soup and
    serve with lime wedges
     
  4. George

    George Guest

    tiberius wrote:

    >>Explore Vietnam Life - Visit: www.waytovietnam.com

    >
    >
    >
    > Seventy-three cents?!?! Damned.....you can't even get a small order
    > of fries for that here in the U.S.
    >
    > Any ideas how much this would cost to make, per serving, in the U.S.?
    > Certainly more than seventy-three cents, eh?



    Typical prices for a large bowl are ~ $6 . No idea what it would cost to
    make. Tried but couldn't come close.

    If anyone is in the Philly area there are some good Pho shops there. I
    hadn't been in Philly for a long time but have been there frequently the
    past year.

    There are a couple at the two Vietnamese shopping centers on Washington
    Ave (one at 6th the other at 11th). Also a great place to get the
    ingredients because there are Vietnamese markets at both places.




    >
    > Anyway...compliments of Gourmet Magazine via The Food Network website.
    >
    >
    >
    > Pho Bo (Hanoi Beef Noodle Soup)
    >
    >
    > 6 cups beef broth
    > 1 (1/4-inch thick) slice ginger
    > 2 whole star anise*
    > 1 cinnamon stick
    > 1/2 pound piece boneless beef sirloin, trimmed of any fat
    > 3 ounces dried flat rice noodles*
    > 1/4 cup Asian fish sauce*
    > 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    > 1 cup fresh bean sprouts, rinsed and drained
    > 1/8 cup minced scallions
    > 1/4 cup fresh cilantro sprigs, washed and finely chopped
    > 1 small thin fresh red or green Asian chilie, sliced very thin
    > 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves
    > Lime wedges for garnish
    > *Available at Asian Markets
    >
    > In a 2 quart saucepan bring broth, ginger, star anise, and cinnamon to
    > a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
    > With a very sharp knife cut sirloin across the grain into very thin
    > slices.
    > In a large bowl soak noodles in hot water to cover 15 minutes, or
    > until softened and pliable.
    > While noodles are soaking, bring a kettle of salted water to a boil
    > for noodles. Drain noodles in a colander and cook in boiling water,
    > stirring 45 seconds, or until tender. Drain noodles in a colander. Set
    > aside.
    > Strain broth into saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir in fish sauce,
    > salt and pepper. Add sirloin and sprouts and cook 30 to 45 seconds, or
    > until sirloin changes color. Skim any froth from soup.
    > To serve, divide noodles into 4 bowls. Ladle soup over noodles.
    > Sprinkle scallion greens, cilantro, chilies and basil over soup and
    > serve with lime wedges
     
  5. Tiberius.
    You don't believe me? So, I may think that you've nerver been Vietnam.
    You can't get a smaller order of fries with that price in U.S, but in
    Vietnam, you can.
    Vietnam is a home of "Pho" - the tradition and most favourite food for
    every people.
    I hope you will have a chance to visit Vietnam, and check my ideal :)

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Vietnam Charm
    Explore Vietnam Life - www.waytovietnam.com
     
  6. At the Jade Dragon Vietnamese restaurant across the street from my
    apartment, a bowl of pho with beef (brisket, tripe, cellophane noodles
    et al with fresg bean sprouts, scallions,chilis and basil will set you
    back at least $8.

    And I didn't like it - first Asian cuisine I haven't been able to warm
    up to. Didn't like the spring rolls or severa of the other dishes. Too
    bad. The restaurant is very reasonable, the service is good and it's
    steps from my door . . . even in the midst of a blizzard!

    Lynn in Fargo
     
  7. Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    > At the Jade Dragon Vietnamese restaurant across the street from my
    > apartment,


    (*envy*)

    > a bowl of pho with beef (brisket, tripe, cellophane noodles
    > et al with fresg bean sprouts, scallions,chilis and basil will set you
    > back at least $8.


    Pricy. In Fargo? Really? 8 bucks for a bowl of noodles?

    > And I didn't like it - first Asian cuisine I haven't been able to warm
    > up to. Didn't like the spring rolls or severa of the other dishes. Too
    > bad. The restaurant is very reasonable, the service is good and it's
    > steps from my door . . . even in the midst of a blizzard!


    Interesting. Vietnamese food is usually super-good.
    Maybe you've found out why that one Viet Namese
    family ended up in Fargo...

    --Blair
     
  8. It's too expensive at your City.
    I can;t imagine that from my country.
     
Loading...