What Is Rated As The Best Bike Lock ??



Canuckophile

New Member
Jun 3, 2011
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Hi, I need to buy a high end bike lock for my nice bike, as I will be leaving it underground parking lot, with some security supervision. There is a heavy steel with loops to attach it to.

What bike lock stands out as the very best one these days?

Thank you
 
May 25, 2011
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There is no bike lock that can protect your bike against a thief that wants your bike, has equipment and all of about 30 seconds of time.

So get one that is suitable for you -

do you want one you can attach to your bike - like a D-lock
one you can sling through your wheels because you have quick-theft wheels

personally i use an ABUS 1000/100 because it will fit around my waist.

this lock has a 10 star -GOLD - top level security rating,
yet a few years ago i lost the key to my bike, (both of them and the key number)

went to a DIY shop, bought a hacksaw for £1 - and a 25p ultra hard diamond coated saw blade.

Cut through my lock in less than a minute - was literally like cutting bread.

in broad daylight on a busy street - no one even tried to stop me
 

vspa

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2009
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Originally Posted by theBreadSultan .

went to a DIY shop, bought a hacksaw for £1 - and a 25p ultra hard diamond coated saw blade.

Cut through my lock in less than a minute - was literally like cutting bread.

in broad daylight on a busy street - no one even tried to stop me
now you found yourself a new profession !
 

the cyclops

New Member
Jul 25, 2010
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If I could figure out how to carry this thing I would get it...But seriously,I use a kryptonite U-lock/Brinks steel cable combo...
 

Froze

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Jul 13, 2004
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The Python is only 1 review, thus it only takes one to get 5 stars, if a second one was to report and they gave it one star then it would be rated 2 1/2 stars. You need to have more reviews before you make a snap judgment of a lock. And that site is a new post on locks so none of the locks have many reviews yet. But the best lock up until last year Kryptonite New York Forgetaboutit U-Bolt lock (which the name may have been changed to Evo 3000) and the same name Chain with lock. But the Chain lock is very heavy and a pain to carry. Also the theft warranty is a pain in the ashe to get paid should a thief steal your bike. You first need a police report and some police agencies won't even bother taking a report on a bike so you lose right there unless you go to the station, then you need a bunch of photos of the undisturbed crime scene including pics of the lock, what it was locked to and surrounding area for adequate lighting. Then they want the lock, the box the lock came in with the UPC code intact, and the original receipt; PLUS the original receipt for the bicycle. Then if they decide you have fulfilled all the obligations and they find your lock was locked properly and to a secure object they will send a check in about 2 to 3 months for it's used (depreciated) value minus any aftermarket stuff you may have put on over the years. It's better just to have renters or homeowners insurance, all they need is a police report and proof of purchase, you pay the deductible and they will pay the current market value for a new bike similar to yours.
 

kdelong

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Dec 14, 2006
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Originally Posted by Froze .

The Python is only 1 review, thus it only takes one to get 5 stars, if a second one was to report and they gave it one star then it would be rated 2 1/2 stars. You need to have more reviews before you make a snap judgment of a lock. And that site is a new post on locks so none of the locks have many reviews yet. But the best lock up until last year Kryptonite New York Forgetaboutit U-Bolt lock (which the name may have been changed to Evo 3000) and the same name Chain with lock. But the Chain lock is very heavy and a pain to carry. Also the theft warranty is a pain in the ashe to get paid should a thief steal your bike. You first need a police report and some police agencies won't even bother taking a report on a bike so you lose right there unless you go to the station, then you need a bunch of photos of the undisturbed crime scene including pics of the lock, what it was locked to and surrounding area for adequate lighting. Then they want the lock, the box the lock came in with the UPC code intact, and the original receipt; PLUS the original receipt for the bicycle. Then if they decide you have fulfilled all the obligations and they find your lock was locked properly and to a secure object they will send a check in about 2 to 3 months for it's used (depreciated) value minus any aftermarket stuff you may have put on over the years. It's better just to have renters or homeowners insurance, all they need is a police report and proof of purchase, you pay the deductible and they will pay the current market value for a new bike similar to yours.
Thanks for telling us which locks not to get. Do you have a suggestion of which lock is the best that is available this year?
 

goatgoat

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May 18, 2011
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Many cables and standard size locks can be had with bold cutters in a flash. The harder and thicker the metal the better. But thebreadsultan is right, locks are just for the honest criminals.

Locks are just another theft deterrent, and can only slow a thief down. Just as valuable as locks are other theft-deterring techniques like parking in highly visible areas, and making your bike look difficult to get at. When I have to park on the street in Vancouver for a long period of time, I actually use multiple locks: one 7' cable lock (10mm steel cable) wrapped through both wheels, and crazy random loops through the frame (looks more intimidating), as well as an additional chain lock wherever is the most visible. I also remove all my cycling accessories from the bike to limit the attention it draws. If a location allows bikes to be parked inside, it's always worth considering.

God forbid it gets stolen, but there's only so much one can do.
 

Froze

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Jul 13, 2004
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Originally Posted by goatgoat .

Many cables and standard size locks can be had with bold cutters in a flash. The harder and thicker the metal the better. But thebreadsultan is right, locks are just for the honest criminals.

Locks are just another theft deterrent, and can only slow a thief down. Just as valuable as locks are other theft-deterring techniques like parking in highly visible areas, and making your bike look difficult to get at. When I have to park on the street in Vancouver for a long period of time, I actually use multiple locks: one 7' cable lock (10mm steel cable) wrapped through both wheels, and crazy random loops through the frame (looks more intimidating), as well as an additional chain lock wherever is the most visible. I also remove all my cycling accessories from the bike to limit the attention it draws. If a location allows bikes to be parked inside, it's always worth considering.

God forbid it gets stolen, but there's only so much one can do.




Originally Posted by kdelong .




Thanks for telling us which locks not to get. Do you have a suggestion of which lock is the best that is available this year?
Last year is the last year of tests were done on locks, this years locks are too new to have been tested. But Krpto locks always win anyways so I doubt if a newcomer will knock it off the podium.
 

Froze

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Jul 13, 2004
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If you really want the ideal theft protection for you bike, then I suggest buying a clunker and riding it to the places you have to lock it at and leave the nice bike at home for your rides when you don't have to lock it. Even if you lock is so well some thief will be completely unable to get it, he can still strip the bike of it's parts; but no lock is undefeatable given the right tools, in fact the wave in Europe and spreading here is picking, so far no lock made has ever been pick proof, and picking involves no major tools to carry around, you just sit down and fiddle with the lock like your key isn't working being completely ignored by any and all passerby's.
 

goatgoat

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May 18, 2011
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Originally Posted by Froze .

so far no lock made has ever been pick proof, and picking involves no major tools to carry around, you just sit down and fiddle with the lock like your key isn't working being completely ignored by any and all passerby's.

Very true. Picking standard locks can be practiced and executed quickly. There are however high security locks available, which feature security pins which are much harder (but still possible) to pick. Unfortunately the cost of these locks are likely not justified for bike use.
 

tafi

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Jul 31, 2003
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Arguments about whether or not a lock can be picked are pretty moot when most passers-by wouldn't care if you were using an angle grinder....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7zb8YXrmIA

If you think this could only happen in New York, think again. I live in Sydney, and we Aussies like to pride ourselves on being friendly and caring towards each other. But I could still stand on a busy city corner (corner of George St and King St for those who know the area) at lunch time on a Friday hacking at someone's ABUS shielded cable lock with a pair of 80cm long bolt cutters, and no-one battered an eyelid. Before you ask, the guy who belonged to the lock was a courier who had just dropped his keys down a drain. But I found it really weird that no-one even raised an eyebrow.
Oh, and the bolt cutters made short work of the $80 lock. Even though they were blunt he was on his way again in two minutes.

For U locks a quieter means of breaking is to use a car jack (the kind that comes with the car) to pop it open.
No bike lock is safe, anywhere. I've even seen the leftovers of an entire bike rack being unbolted from the slab and loaded (complete with all the attached bikes) into a van. A few guys working as a team got it done in minutes. They could then go back to a workshop and break all the locks at their leisure.
I and my colleagues used to hold competitions to see how quickly we could crack combination locks. I wasn't particularly good, but one guy could crack a four digit combo lock in under a minute, and for that you only need your bare hands.

Of course it's only the hardened theives, who are clear of head and deft of hand, who are the ones who can get this sort of thing done on the tougher locks (and it is usualy worth it if the bike is even remotely expensive). In a lot of cases, however, a quality lock will deter the casual opportunist, looking for a quick buck.

Long story short, if you want to be sure your bike won't be nicked then it shouln't leave your sight.
 
May 25, 2011
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Originally Posted by tafi .

Arguments about whether or not a lock can be picked are pretty moot when most passers-by wouldn't care if you were using an angle grinder....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7zb8YXrmIA

If you think this could only happen in New York, think again. I live in Sydney, and we Aussies like to pride ourselves on being friendly and caring towards each other. But I could still stand on a busy city corner (corner of George St and King St for those who know the area) at lunch time on a Friday hacking at someone's ABUS shielded cable lock with a pair of 80cm long bolt cutters, and no-one battered an eyelid. Before you ask, the guy who belonged to the lock was a courier who had just dropped his keys down a drain. But I found it really weird that no-one even raised an eyebrow.
Oh, and the bolt cutters made short work of the $80 lock. Even though they were blunt he was on his way again in two minutes.

For U locks a quieter means of breaking is to use a car jack (the kind that comes with the car) to pop it open.
No bike lock is safe, anywhere. I've even seen the leftovers of an entire bike rack being unbolted from the slab and loaded (complete with all the attached bikes) into a van. A few guys working as a team got it done in minutes. They could then go back to a workshop and break all the locks at their leisure.
I and my colleagues used to hold competitions to see how quickly we could crack combination locks. I wasn't particularly good, but one guy could crack a four digit combo lock in under a minute, and for that you only need your bare hands.

Of course it's only the hardened theives, who are clear of head and deft of hand, who are the ones who can get this sort of thing done on the tougher locks (and it is usualy worth it if the bike is even remotely expensive). In a lot of cases, however, a quality lock will deter the casual opportunist, looking for a quick buck.

Long story short, if you want to be sure your bike won't be nicked then it shouln't leave your sight.

Ha Ha that video is classic,
(not sure how he managed to take 6 minutes using a saw - guess he had a crappy blade with not enough teeth.)

to be honest the best way to keep your bike un-stolen can be summed up in a conversation i had with my mate many years back.
I was trying to be clever and show off some new trivia.
"if we were walking in some woods and we were suddenly confronted by a bear - would you know what to do?"
my mate : Yea, I'd run as fast as i can
"well you would be eaten then, you can't outrun a bear."
my mate : I don't need to run faster than the bear, I just need to run faster than you.

and the same applies for bikes.
If a thief sees 2 bikes, he will take the easier one.

the best way to make your bike unatractive to thieves is to lock it up, off the ground - as high as you can.
in the view of a CCTV camera

or hide it.
yea it goes against what you might think - locking your bike in a dark ally behind a burned out car - bad move.

but as the video proves - daylight and people is not really a deterent - so you may as well hide it.

and those are my 2 main tips.
if you can't lock your bike somewhere you can see it - or there are a large amount of people around who are likely to get involved (i.e. outside a pub)

lock it high - and failing that - out of sight

after all - you can't stop someone stealing your bike, just as you can't outrun a bear....
you can however make the other bikes look easier and more tasty
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
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Originally Posted by irwin7638 .

I like the Abus Bordo "chain." It is made of long plate links,seems as secure as any U-lock I've seen and collapses into a holster that fits onto the frame.

http://simplecycle-marc.blogspot.com/2010/11/locks-improvements-and-more-locks.html

Marc
Did you even bother looking closely at that lock? All it does is locks the rear wheel to the stays and does nothing to lock the bike to a stationary secured object!! Anybody, and it's been done more times then not, can take the bike and work on the lock at home. There has been many bikes stolen where the cyclist locked his bike to a pole and the bike and lock was simply lifted over the pole, or locked a bike to a small tree or a few links in a chain link fence and the thief cuts the tree or cuts the links.

At a college I went to, 4 guys came rolling up in a flatbed pickup in broad daylight to a bike rack with the rack full of bikes and picked up the ENTIRE bike rack and threw it in the back of the truck and took off. There were about 18 bikes on the rack. Witness's saw the action but the truck had no license plates and as far as I know they never caught the thieves. No lock will stop that! Of course nowadays they bolt the racks into the cement.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
4,711
756
83
NE Indiana
Funny I know people from Australia and when they write they never use "yea" in sentencing. And that old saying about running faster then bears is an Amercian saying, you don't have bears in Australia unless your thinking of the little Koala then I would laugh my ass off if I saw the two of you whackas running for "lives" from that. And in Australia the Aussie word for pub is boozer; so you attempt to be Aussie by using words like yea and mate but fail at being an Aussie and become British by using pub? .I think you're a clayton's or are you just trying to be a dag or just plain drongo or just too much mull?
Hooroo for now.
 

irwin7638

New Member
Mar 22, 2011
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Originally Posted by Froze .



Did you even bother looking closely at that lock? All it does is locks the rear wheel to the stays and does nothing to lock the bike to a stationary secured object!! Anybody, and it's been done more times then not, can take the bike and work on the lock at home. There has been many bikes stolen where the cyclist locked his bike to a pole and the bike and lock was simply lifted over the pole, or locked a bike to a small tree or a few links in a chain link fence and the thief cuts the tree or cuts the links.

At a college I went to, 4 guys came rolling up in a flatbed pickup in broad daylight to a bike rack with the rack full of bikes and picked up the ENTIRE bike rack and threw it in the back of the truck and took off. There were about 18 bikes on the rack. Witness's saw the action but the truck had no license plates and as far as I know they never caught the thieves. No lock will stop that! Of course nowadays they bolt the racks into the cement.
You apparantly are looking at the "ring locks" in the review. Right, they only lock up the rear wheel to prevent the casual thief from riding off with the bike. I only use or recommend them for low crime areas when the bike is left in sight for a few minutes.
The Abus Bordo is a very substantial chain type lock which does lock the front wheel and frame to a stationary object..

It has a couple nice features, the cylinder for the combination is seperated from the locking mechanism itself which prevents a thief from feeling the tumblers fall into place, and it fits into this nifty holster which attaches to the frame with velcro or to the water bottle bosses.


Onthe downside, they are heavy and they are not cheap.

Marc
 

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