What is the toughest tubular tire, in your opinion.



WalterDreyer

New Member
Dec 10, 2010
10
0
0
I recently bought a set of tubular wheels. i want to use them for commuting to work. 20 miles one way. Reliability is highest in importance. What tubular tire seems to have the best resistance to flats?
 

dsb137

New Member
Sep 13, 2006
43
1
0
I have worn out several sets of Conti Sprinters in the past few seasons... Haven't had a flat, but a couple had to come off prematurely because the base tape started to peel, a repairable condition, but I haven't bothered yet... Having said that, I am currently on Vitt Pave' (the 24mm flavor, 290 tpi...) and have had good luck so far...

HTH,
Dave
 

bgoetz

Member
Nov 25, 2010
816
20
18
I have sprinters on my wheels and have worn the rear so flat that you can see the inter part of the tire in a couple of the cuts that I have. Race season is over, so I only use them for club races and won't replace them until next year, but to this point I have never had a flat (knocks on wood). I have no intention of going with the sprinters next year, they are just not that fast of a tire, I will be going with the Corsa Evos, I am not sure of the durability of these, but they are certainly faster. I would personally never commute on tubulars, but a can of fix a flat is always a good thing when doing more than racing with tubulars.
 

T-Mobile

New Member
May 26, 2011
17
0
0
I run Conti gatorskins tubeis on my race wheels, I have got a few flats but it was because I hit a large pot hole at high speed. I can really say about how well they hold up as I only use them for races and just got them this season so they don't have too many miles on them. I will say this much, IMO Conti's are one of them best brands if your going to mount the tires yourself. I put down the base tape, stretch the tire onto the rim and your done, there is next to no time spent aligning them like I have heard with some other tires.

To each thier own but just out of curiosity, who do you want to run tubulars for commuting, flats are a real pain in the A$$!! I have two tubulars I need to send to tire alert to get fixed.
 

WalterDreyer

New Member
Dec 10, 2010
10
0
0
I accidentally bought them, I thought I was bidding on clinchers. I'm afraid I would lose money if I tried to resell them, so I'm trying to determine if I could use them day to day. It sounds like I may be able to get away with some conti's and some tire sealant. Small punctures could actually turn out to be quicker to fix on the road, with a more permanent fix later.
 

lanierb

New Member
Aug 12, 2004
495
2
0
Actually tubies are fine to use for commuting -- maybe not ideal, but fine. The main issue with them is not the flat repair on the road, but the fact that it takes longer to properly mount them at home. Also they need to be pumped up every single day (due to using a latex inner tube). You have some decisions to make regarding mounting. Tape is easier and glue is stronger. For most commutes tape should be fine. If you're doing high speed descents in hot weather with hairpins, then you'll definitely want to use glue. Here's what you do on the road:

(1) Carry a spare lightweight folded tire in your seat bag along with a CO2 inflator. The tire needs to be prestretched and preglued (if you are using glue). If you get the right kind of tire (something like a Tufo S3 lite 215g), after letting the glue dry you can fold it very small. You remove all air, then fold it in half on itself so the glued base tape is completely covered (tape to tape), with the valve at one of the two end creases. Then keep folding in half a few more times and it really is very small and will fit inside a seat bag.

(2) If you are using glue, leave a small area (two inches) with very little or no glue opposite the valve. This will make the tire easier to remove when you need to change a flat. For tape you won't need this (even with glue you don't *need* it, but if you do a really good glue job it will help make your life easier).

(3) When you get a flat simply change the tire and inflate the new tubie. Regardless of whether you are using tape or glue the tire will hold fine until you get home -- just don't go wild.

If you do these things, changing a tubular on the road will be as fast or faster than changing a clincher -- people who are good at it can do it in less than two minutes. It also has the advantage that you have a brand new tire as a spare, so you can recover from even massive cuts/holes. The difference is that with a tubie when you get home you will have to remove your temporary tire and then either repair or replace your old tire (you can also send it out for repair -- they will replace the tube inside), so it's much more work when you get home than a clincher would be. You can also just carry sealant but if you get a large hole then you better have your cell phone.

Sorry I can't help with the original question. I only ride tubies in races. I would suggest asking the question on the weight weenies forum (google it). THere are a lot of really knowledgable people there who ride tubies every day.
 

lanierb

New Member
Aug 12, 2004
495
2
0
Just a quick follow-up: I notice that Conti makes a tubular called Sprinter Gatorskin that's not cheap but not horrendously expensive either. The clincher gatorskins have a good reputation for being durable, so these might be worth a try.
 

vspa

Active Member
Jan 11, 2009
2,203
39
0
i used to know how to patch tubulars,
sewing, with the correct materials (appropriate: needle, thread, wax) is the tricky part, someone will have to show you how it is done first, like the thread pattern, the correct amount of sewing "pressure", etc
it will take you 10 to 20 minutes,

look at Sheldon's for detailed information, but you still need to actually see in person how it is done,
http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/tubular-repair.html
 

ambal

Active Member
Oct 15, 2010
905
34
28
Originally Posted by lanierb .

Just a quick follow-up: I notice that Conti makes a tubular called Sprinter Gatorskin that's not cheap but not horrendously expensive either. The clincher gatorskins have a good reputation for being durable, so these might be worth a try.

I've found the gator skin to be pretty poor, weak sidewalls and god damn they collect some glass. I'd prefer to train on cheap Gommitalia tires any day.
 

lanierb

New Member
Aug 12, 2004
495
2
0
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambal .
I've found the gator skin to be pretty poor, weak sidewalls and god damn they collect some glass. I'd prefer to train on cheap Gommitalia tires any day.
Clincher or tubular? I've heard nothing but good things about the durability of the clinchers. That said, if you ride over enough glass pretty much any tire will get a flat.