what is tiller effect ?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by John Clarke, Feb 22, 2003.

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  1. John Clarke

    John Clarke Guest

    I read the review on the Optima Stinger, and saw the term "tiller effect". Can someone explain
    this to me.

    Thanks,

    John Clarke
     
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  2. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    Think of steering a sail boat. You move the tiller from side to side to steer.

    Exactly the same for a bent. The bars are usually quite a ways from the axis of the steering tube
    and thus you have 'tiller effect"

    --
    Miles of Smiles,

    Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone

    www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  3. "John Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I read the review on the Optima Stinger, and saw the term "tiller effect". Can someone explain
    > this to me.
    >

    Hi, John. I wrote that review. The sailboat analogy in the previous reply is correct, but I will add
    that tiller can be adjusted, depending on the bike and the steering setup, along with a couple of
    other comments.

    Basically, the farther the handlebars are from the steering axis (the line that runs through the
    headset), the more tiller there will be and the more you'll have to move the bars sideways (as
    opposed to rotating them about their center) to steer the bike. At normal riding speeds, this is
    not really noticeable, but at very low speeds where more steering correction is needed you will
    notice it. Also, the farther back on the bike the center of gravity is relative to the wheelbase,
    the more noticeable the tiller will be, because with the weight far back over the rear wheel, more
    correction is needed to get the bike to track (remember, the bike rotates around its center of
    gravity, therefore with the front wheel far from the c.g. it needs to turn more in order to make
    the bike rotate).

    Regarding adjustment, with a flip-it type stem you can raise the bars up (within limits...
    eventually they get in the way of your eyes and/or knees), thereby reducing the distance between the
    steering axis and the bars, and therefore the amount of tiller. In fact, I replaced the adjust bolt
    on the stem of the test bike with a longer one so I could do this, and it did alter the handling of
    the bike slightly.

    As I said in the review, it's really a personal preference thing. Lots of people have bikes with a
    lot of tiller and it doesn't bother them. I prefer to stretch my arms out.

    BTW, the bike is for sale for well below dealer cost if you know anyone who's interested.

    Andy Douglas Bentrider Online
     
  4. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    Tom Blum wrote:
    > Think of steering a sail boat. You move the tiller from side to side to steer.
    >
    > Exactly the same for a bent. The bars are usually quite a ways from the axis of the steering tube
    > and thus you have 'tiller effect"

    Well, at least it's exactly the same for those bents that have it. The bents I like don't have any
    at all. They all have underseat indirect steering with zero tiller effect.
     
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