What is your cleaning setup ?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by gman0482, Nov 2, 2009.

  1. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    kerosene, deisel Oil, Wd40, commercial/storebought degreaser, hairspray, acetone, alcohol, paint and lacquer thinner, orange oil and cleaner,Pledge,gun cleaning spray can, finish line degreser for a chain cleaning "machine", brush set, pledge, rubbing compound, metal polish, car wax and lots of rags and shop towels- both paper and cloth
    The Non-Obvious stuff-
    ACETONE
    for getting grease etc. off parts that need to be COMPLETELY CLEAN ie: BB Spindle flats (is solvent for epoxy as well)
    WD40
    for getting water out of hard to reach places, de-greasing- AND IS A LOUSY LUBRICANT
    HAIRSPRAY
    for cleaning braking surfaces ( rim and pads) and removing road grime and is great as an aid sliding on grips etc, as it dries it holds them in place
    ALCOHOL
    for giving tires more "grip" hairspray works too
    KEROSENE-
    is great solvent BUT,- DO NOT USE on bearing surfaces ( races cones etc ) as it WILL damage them as will other "harsh solvents"
    DEISEL OIL
    Good all round solvent- is highly recommened for bearing related use ( see above) as it also a good lubricant and "leaves" a thin film
     


  2. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Hairspray? That's a new one, but a good idea I guess. I'll have to borrow some and try it. I don't think I will be getting into Kerosene or Deisel Oil as there are too many safer solvents and lubes out there that work nearly as well. I haven't got anything on my bikes that require a "harsh solvent". Maybe if I neglected maintenance for a few years I would need it, but most gunk that I remove either wipes right off or comes off easily with a little help from Simple Green.
     
  3. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    Ive never "dumped" the deisel or Kerosene, I recycle them myself by letting the dirty stuff settle in a glass jar and re-using. The "dregs" go to the local waste facility, neither one are flammable,(I've even tried lighting them with a match). I learned to use deisel from a 7-11 mechanic, (who worked the Giro) I use 'em most on bikes that belong to "knotheads" that don't keep thiers clean
     
  4. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    people don't use petroleum derivatives any more around here, while years ago they were the preferred cleaning agents. It has to do with corrosion of your bike i guess.

    anyway im a bit lazy for my maintenace, i have to catch up with you guys
     
  5. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    That's quite a list of cleaning products. But why would kerosene be "damaging" to bearing surfaces while diesel is OK? Thought these two consisted of virtually the same kinds of petroleum distillates.
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I question that, too.

    For the record Diesel and Kerosine are both flammable; they are not, however, very volatile.
     
  7. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Yeah, safer than using gasoline as a solvent. But as we know, really none of the stuff is great for the environment from a VOC standpoint vs "citrus" cleaners....or using an old rag or toothbrush. Confess that I keep a jar of used paint thinner (mineral spirits) around, and have tossed cassette cogs in that for cleaning when the cassette is off. Cleaning like that is really a waste of time IMO, but it does add that all-important bling on the Saturday club ride:)
     
  8. tonyzackery

    tonyzackery Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, fellas, for late warning on the air compressor drying:rolleyes:. No wonder my bikes fell apart yesterday...I'd been using the air compressor too much and all the bearings went kaput in only 2 years time...who knew???

    Okay, okay, enough of the jesting - Gman, as long as you're not pointing the nozzle directly at, and/or in extremely close proximity to, sensitive sealed areas, you'll be just fine drying your bike with some compressed air. Turn the pressure down (30-40psi is satisfactory) and "git 'er dun"...

    Preferred cleaner is 'Super Clean'. Will dis-color painted surfaces though...
     
  9. bkaapcke

    bkaapcke New Member

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    For the drivetrain; Brake Klean, a towel and pipe cleaners.

    For almost everything else; Windex and a towel

    For the wheels brake surface; Simple Green and a Scotch cloth.

    bk:):)
     
  10. riderofbikes

    riderofbikes New Member

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    For drivetrain, any citrus degreaser works well. Nothing $fancy$ though. Generic Home Depot stuff will do (sorry Pedro's).

    For the rest? Liquid dish soap. Dawn will run you about $0.89/bottle.
    I think the actual "Bike Wash" stuff from the big brands is about $12? <-- Of course, that one does come with a picture of a bicycle on the label.
     
  11. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    kerosene is a solvent only and "harsh", deisel is both a solvent and a lubricant. I can't remember exactly why or where, but that's one thing I've learned from the thousands of mags (apx 60 per yr) and dozens of books I've read, years worked in shops, the national/international/pro level riders, coaches and the team mechanics I've known,ridden,worked and hung with in the past 35 yrs. It has something to do with getting into (the pores?) the metal and causing some sort of irrepairable damage
    I'm really not trying to brag I'm trying to establish credibility
    I don't use K or D very much any more the other stuff is easier to deal with, but is "the other stuff" as effective or as good for the bike? Ask ten "experts" and you'll probably get 20 answers

    QUOTE=dhk2;3917088]That's quite a list of cleaning products. But why would kerosene be "damaging" to bearing surfaces while diesel is OK? Thought these two consisted of virtually the same kinds of petroleum distillates.[/QUOTE]
     
  12. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Now maybe this is crazy, but I think I'd trust what NSK Motion and Control has to say on kerosene and bearings over what bike mechanics say. Oddly enough NSK makes bearings and they say this:

    5. Inspection of Bearings | NSK Global .

    Interesting. I wonder if they know what they're talking about?

    Here, Process Lubricants Ltd, in describing their DAG 2404 lubrication additive state that it can be diluted with kerosene. Moreover they say that with the lube addititive ( used in hostile/hot environments in bearings) extends bearing life. You would think if there were an issue with kerosene and bearing surfaces/metals, that it would be much worse at high temps. Apparently there is no problem.
     
  13. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    point taken, thanks - to be honest I've often wokderedif what I'd been told re: keosene was true
    Code:
    
    
     
  14. Akadat

    Akadat New Member

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    I use kero or shellite with a toilet brush or aerosol degreaser to dissolve the oily crud, then detergent to clean off the oil solvents and residues as well as the water soluble crud like mud, grass juice and spider droppings. The oily crud is restricted to the drivechain and related parts.

    Acetone (aka laquer thinners) has been mentioned...it will dissolve paints and plastics and get to clean metal if you let it. Will melt plastic brushes too! Acetone is an alcohol type solvent and not the best for removing petroleum oils and greases.

    Anyway, after the detergent a gentle rinse with a spray of water will get everything clean and oil free. All that remains is to wipe with a towel, spin dry, and put clean oil where it belongs.

    A bit of car polish will make your bike a pride and joy for a while.

    I try to put oil into all the bearings after a wash. If the oil can't get in past the seals then no water or dirt got in either (high pressure gas and hoses excepted). Wipe off excess oil for a final touch.:)
     
  15. Sthenic

    Sthenic New Member

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    Training bike gets white lightning on the chain every 200-400 miles. Couple times a year the frame gets sprayed down with diluted simple green, grit rubbed off and lightly rinsed off. I also leave the original chain grease on when installing a new chain (6-8k miles) and just add white lightning as needed.
     
  16. BigUgly

    BigUgly New Member

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    Simple green for everything, straight for the chain, mixed for everything else.
     
  17. OldGoat

    OldGoat New Member

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    Carbon cleaner (or any frame) : ? Water, moist rag

    Degreaser : ? The bio-degradable "orange" stuff from the auto parts store. It's cheap and it works! Remove chain and drop in container with degreaser. Shake. Remove, rinse and dry w/ paper towel. Reinstall with Connex link. Lube. Do much the same with cassette (except no lube). Do NOT apply degreaser to the cassette while it's attached to the freehub; you do not want degreaser anywhere near anything that has bearings in it.)

    I save the dirty degreaser in a container. After a few days, the crud settles to the bottom, after which I gently pour all but the dregs into a clean container for later reuse.

    Polisher: ? None

    Lubricant: ? White Lightning Clean Ride. Toothbrush is handy for removing debris from chain before relubing in between major cleanings. Just hold against the chain surfaces and give the crank a spin. Then apply Clean Ride. Remove excess (and loads of black crud) with a rag or paper towel while spinning crank. Note: It's a lot easier to clean the chain (or remove/reinstall it) while the bike is in a repair stand. Same for general cleaning of the frame and most any other bike maintenance tasks.
     
  18. Adam-from-SLO

    Adam-from-SLO New Member

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    I use that to, plus a bunch of elbow grease ;):D
     
  19. toomanybikes

    toomanybikes New Member

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    If my bike is dirty, I leave it out in the rain.
     
  20. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    This is one way to ensure that you no longer have too many bikes.
     
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