What is your diet regimen?

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by gracer, Jul 9, 2016.

  1. gracer

    gracer Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2016
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    8
    Every person has unique, individual needs when it comes to nutrition. Every cyclist also has individual nutritional requirements. One can have overactive sweat glands that requires him/her to take in more fluids and minerals, another can easily develop low sugar that requires him/her to always have a ready source of sugar available when needed and many more unique traits for every cyclist.

    I for one have to take in a heavy breakfast complete with grains, protein and carbs especially when I know I will ride a bike during the day. I also have to take in and bring a lot of water because I easily thirst. Lastly, I take candies as a source of sugar if ever I would suddenly feel weak while cycling.

    How about you, what is your diet or supplementary regimen before cycling?
     


  2. sharkantropo

    sharkantropo Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    305
    Likes Received:
    20
    Nothing remarkable compared to the diet of high intensity athletes. Usually I eat rice, bread or pasta for my calories intake. Fish and chicken as main source of protein, and vegetables or fruits for everything else.
     
  3. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    974
    Likes Received:
    93
    When I ride, I sometimes skip breakfast depending on the time. There are times that I ride very early in the morning, before sunrise so breakfast is not an option since my appetite for eating is still asleep. I usually ride with groups at about 7am. That gives me a convenient time to have my breakfast and some rest before riding. By the way, most of the riding groups that I join come from the direction of Manila so they have been riding for about 20 kilometers before they reach our village gate, that's when I join them.
     
  4. sbayhylle

    sbayhylle New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2016
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm only able to ride on weekends and typically do 15-20 miles both days. I ride fasted and take a large bottle of water with me. That being said, I work out 4 days/week in addition to riding on the weekends and I eat a very clean diet and use the Zone method to block all of my meals.
     
  5. zipp2001

    zipp2001 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Messages:
    425
    Likes Received:
    98
    My breakfast depends on what distance I'm riding. During the week I'm riding after work so breakfast doesn't come into play, and my lunch is most days a sandwich with fruit. Saturday if I'm only going out for a quick 20-25 mile ride then I usually have no breakfast and carry one water bottle. If it's over 25 miles I will have a peanut butter and banana sandwich before I ride, and take a package of Clif Bloks or Clif Shot with me. For hydration it's two bottles one with water, and one with Skratch Labs exercise hydration mix. Sunday's I'm not on the road until after church so breakfast again doesn't come into play. Most Sundays I don't eat breakfast and have a cup of coffee and a Clif Bloks or Clif Shot before I get on the bike around 12:30 to ride.
     
  6. north woods gal

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2016
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    9
    I control my type II diabetes, completely and very successfully, with my low carb diet. The only carbs I eat in any great quantity are green (free) carbs. That means no sugar, no starch, and not even flour products. Very limited fruits. My energy comes from protein and fats, via nuts and oils. I eat a breakfast and an evening meal, but no lunch or snacking in between.

    It took about six months for my body to switch over from a carb diet to a protein/fat diet, but I can now easily do 60 miles a day and more without eating. This is not a diet that I would wish on anyone, though. It is tailored specifically to stabilize and control my blood sugar and that it does, superbly. As an added bonus, my weight is right where I want it and I seldom get cavities in my teeth.

    I don't sweat, a lot, so in our cool summers, up here, one bottle of water usually covers me on long rides. Recently went on a trip to Florida, though, I learned how dangerous it can be riding in that heat and humidity. Never left the motel on the bike without at least three bottles of water.
     
  7. lightspeed84

    lightspeed84 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Usually use Macrobars to supplement fuel my legs through a longer ride and vega one shake with flax and chia seeds to help the rebuild process as soon as I'm done with the ride. Meals range between quinoa, beans, large amounts of cooked greens, Goraw granola cereal and lots of water.
     
  8. Choice Cut Nutrition

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    If I'm getting up early to get out the door on a ride, I'll have a small bowl of corn flakes. Digests very quickly and still gives some good carbs for fuel. For a long ride or a race, I will have something more significant. A big bowl of oatmeal with some fruit is perfect if I have a good hour and a half to digest before I start the ride.

    Summer time I drink primarily a sports drink for hydration as well as a little extra sugar to fuel my ride. Cooler months I just bring water along.

    There is a lot we can hit regarding this topic. The key points are nutrition before, during, and after your ride. Including hydration. We have kind of just scratched the surface here. Anybody interested in learning how to carb load, or plan out their race day meals for an endurance event, check out this link. http://www.coach.choicecutnutrition.com/order
     
  9. Morgan Fracisc

    Morgan Fracisc New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with you.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

Loading...