What kind of snacks are good for long rides?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by J . Brian Chamb, Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. Taywood wrote:

    >The OP related to a long ride. Most of your posts offer a short term fix for a routine ride.
    >
    >Do you carry anything in your pack to give you a super feed that will keep you pedalling for the
    >rest of the day? Mike (I was once so exhausted I hid the bike and walked out- with an empty pack)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    The super feed needs to have taken place the day before. No one wants to eat a lasagna on the trail.
    (Well, they do, they just don't much want to ride very far afterward. If you are bonked on the
    trail, all of your needs are short term.

    A
     


  2. Spider

    Spider Guest

    gabrielle <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 07:17:55 -0700, J. Brian Chamberlin wrote:
    >
    > > When I first got into riding, I just threw some fruit into a backpack and munched on that during
    > > my breaks. I never got into the power bars too much. I guess I didn't like paying $3.00 to eat
    > > what tasted like sand. Any suggestions?
    >
    > Power bars are too much work to chew.
    >
    > gorp: combo of home-dried apples, cherries, plums & bananas + almonds + some form of small bits of
    > chocolate. As Penny mentioned, I am also partial to Rosauer's "Glacier Trail" mix, which is
    > peanuts, white choco chips, craisins and something else I don't recall right off the bat.
    >
    > Home-dried beef jerky, from free-range hormone- & antibiotic-free beef of course.
    >
    > Then there's my home-made version of quaker fruit & oatmeal bars which pretty much kick ass.
    >
    > Those unfortunately named life savers Cream Savers thingies are great for getting the
    > saliva going.
    >
    > Oh yeah, and pop-tarts, though they can get kinda crumbly.

    Home-made fruit and oatmeal bars? Kewl. Man, I guess I don't get this whole "snack" thing. I mean,
    I'm never hungry when I'm riding. I take a banana, but half the time I don't eat it until I'm done
    putting the bike back on the car. But I might, if there were oats, molasses, honey, currants and
    milk chololate chips involved... :)

    The best snack is the post-ride beer. Make mine a doppelbock.

    Spider
     
  3. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Spider wrote:
    > gabrielle <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> On Mon, 28 Apr 2003 07:17:55 -0700, J. Brian Chamberlin wrote:
    >> >>
    >> Then there's my home-made version of quaker fruit & oatmeal bars which pretty much kick ass.
    >>
    >> Those unfortunately named life savers Cream Savers thingies are great for getting the
    >> saliva going.
    >>
    >> Oh yeah, and pop-tarts, though they can get kinda crumbly.
    >
    > Home-made fruit and oatmeal bars? Kewl. Man, I guess I don't get this whole "snack" thing. I mean,
    > I'm never hungry when I'm riding. I take a banana, but half the time I don't eat it until I'm done
    > putting the bike back on the car. But I might, if there were oats, molasses, honey, currants and
    > milk chololate chips involved... :)
    >
    > The best snack is the post-ride beer. Make mine a doppelbock.
    >
    > Spider

    I with her if it's a longish ride at all... I"m eating something all the time to keep my energy,
    instead of waiting for the pre-bonk hungries to set
    in.. and then it can be too late.

    Penny
     
  4. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    "Corvus Corvax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Taywood" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >
    > > The OP related to a long ride. Most of your posts offer a short term fix for a routine ride.
    >
    > Uh, except for quantity, what's the difference?
    >
    > Of course, on a real long ride, I stop at a deli and get a Genoa Salami and Swiss Cheese sandwich,
    > with mustard, mayonnaise, lettuce and tomato. And a big can of Foster's Lager.
    >
    > CC

    That sounds delicious. Most of the trails I ride don't have delis. You either have to bring
    it, forage for it, or kill it. I hear the wily Genoa Salami and Swiss is a hard beast to catch
    in the wild.

    Matt
     
  5. "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Most of the trails I ride don't have delis. You either have to bring it, forage for it, or kill
    > it. I hear the wily Genoa Salami and Swiss is a hard beast to catch in the wild.

    It entirely depends on what kind of wilderness you ride in, eh?

    CC
     
  6. MTBScottie

    MTBScottie Guest

    "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > those Luna Bars. They are marketed to women but they seem to work fine for me and taste better
    > > > than your typical Power
    > Bar.
    > > > They aren't making me grow breasts or anything...
    > >
    > > ...yet.
    > >
    > > JD

    Well you've got the long hair though, convincing enough for me!
     
  7. Chris Snell

    Chris Snell Guest

    "J. Brian Chamberlin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > When I first got into riding, I just threw some fruit into a
    backpack
    > and munched on that during my breaks. I never got into the power
    bars
    > too much. I guess I didn't like paying $3.00 to eat what tasted
    like
    > sand. Any suggestions?
    >
    > --Brian
    >
    Something other than the sardines is always good.

    - Chris.
     
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