What Motivates You?



P

Paul Saunders

Guest
What motivates you to go out walking?

And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
you've visited many times before?

Paul
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Paul Saunders wrote:
> What motivates you to go out walking?


Things that make me feel good include getting about under my own steam
and getting away from it all, or if not "all" at least a large part of it.
Walking anywhere manages the first, being away from "civilization" (even
if only around the corner) manages the second, combining the two is even
better.

> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
> you've visited many times before?


Not very much in the first case: usually only if there's not much choice
will I set out on a bad day that has every sign of staying that way
(i.e., a walk-out from a bothy) Sometimes just the getting about under
my own steam thing is enough, but something like a local freight trip on
the cargo bike will usually suffice. Sometimes I need to clear my head
of something that's getting at me, in which case I don't really mind the
weather. Of course, sometimes a bit of unjustified blind optimism in
the weather clearing gets one out, ultimately ending in "well, at least
the exercise was good for me"... ;-/

For the familiar places thing, in my case familiarity does /not/ breed
contempt, or even tiredness. I've been taking the odd stroll or ride
over Balgay Hill in Dundee for years now, and I still think the views
are gorgeous and worth a detour (when I lived the other end of town I'd
detour every day on my cycle commute to put in the unnecessary climb to
take them in).

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
C

Colin MacDonald

Guest
Paul Saunders wrote:
> What motivates you to go out walking?


Views and a sense of achievement in getting to the top.

> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather


Hah! Nothing.

> or to local areas you've visited many times before?


Convenience. Increasingly I find I can't be bothered with the hour and
a half minimum needed to get to big hills.

Colin
 
J

John Goldfine

Guest
"Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]dom2surf.net...
> What motivates you to go out walking?
>
> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
> you've visited many times before?



At home, four dogs get me out every day, usually for at least three twenty
minute walks, often for much more. My pleasure in their pleasure is huge.

I travel to the UK once or twice a year to walk--for the fun of exploring,
for the love of the Ordnance Survey 1:25000, for the satisfaction of seeing
the extraordinary and wonderful in settings otherwise overlooked (off the
beaten track, non- AONB or Park), for the getting to the end of a day and
the prospect of a pint, for the pleasure of seeing expensive equipment and
clothing actually performing as it was designed to.
 
R

Roger

Guest
The message <[email protected]>
from "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> contains these words:

> What motivates you to go out walking?


> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
> you've visited many times before?


Always been a bit of a puzzle to me but whatever it is I has been
sufficiently strong in the past to get me out in the worst of weathers
and to keep me walking when every step was agony.

--
Roger Chapman so far this year 62 summits
New - 28 (Marilyns 14, Nuttalls 5, Outlying Fells 10)
Repeats - 34 (Marilyns 16, Nuttalls 24, Wainwrights 12, Outlying Fells 0)
 
J

josoap

Guest
"Roger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> The message <[email protected]>
> from "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> contains these
> words:
>
>> What motivates you to go out walking?

>
>> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local
>> areas
>> you've visited many times before?

>
> Always been a bit of a puzzle to me but whatever it is I has been
> sufficiently strong in the past to get me out in the worst of weathers
> and to keep me walking when every step was agony.
>
> --
> Roger Chapman so far this year 62 summits
> New - 28 (Marilyns 14, Nuttalls 5, Outlying Fells 10)
> Repeats - 34 (Marilyns 16, Nuttalls 24, Wainwrights 12, Outlying
> Fells 0)

Anything to get away from the 'trouble and strife
Jo
 
G

GSV Three Minds in a Can

Guest
Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
person Paul Saunders <[email protected]> said
>What motivates you to go out walking?


Potentially high blood pressure and thus the alternative of exercising
or of taking pills forever.

>And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
>you've visited many times before?


See above! Actually a quiet stroll around Brown Clee Hill is a chance to
get away from it all for ~4 hours, listen to music on my MP3 player,
maybe meet some interesting people/animals, and see what has changed.
The view is NEVER the same, even if you're there every day. Local areas
also have the benefit I can start/finish at home, know how long it's
going to take almost exactly, and plot routes which are mostly walkable
in trainers (if I feel like it) or which pass conveniently near a pub.
8>.

Mostly I try to walk new areas though .. motivation for that is the GPS
mapping of (Southern) Shropshire, and the 85% still not walked even
once. {The de-motivation is the fact that the paths and conditions of
paths changes faster than I can keep up with, so it's a bit like
painting that bridge ..}

--
GSV Three Minds in a Can
Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
 
S

Simon Edwardes

Guest
Sorry to be the first to admit it, but reaching the summits and ticking
them off a list is a big factor. Must be, because I'm not that
bothered about low-level walks or just going out for a stroll - I must
have an objective. I also tend not to revisit places for the same
reason.

Having said that, I also love the scenery, views, route-planning, maps,
taking photos, using GPS, staying in B&Bs, a pint and a pub-meal
afterwards, etc.

Bad weather is a big turn-off (hence I usually don't book anything more
than 5 days in advance),

Colin Macdonald wrote:
>Increasingly I find I can't be bothered with the hour and
>a half minimum needed to get to big hills.

I too find the prospect of the drive (more like 3-4 hours for me) a
bigger obstacle than the mountains.

Cheers, Simon
http://www.hill-bagging.co.uk
The Mountains of England and Wales
 
D

Dave Fawthrop

Guest
On Thu, 24 Nov 2005 13:26:24 -0000, "Paul Saunders"
<[email protected]> wrote:

| What motivates you to go out walking?
|
| And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
| you've visited many times before?

Staying half way fit.
The "high" caused by exercise induced endorphins?
http://www.chemsoc.org/exemplarchem/entries/mbellringer/endorphins.htm
--
Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk>
Sick and tired of Junk Snail Mail?
Register with http://www.tpsonline.org.uk/mpsr/
IME it works :)
 
Paul Saunders wrote:
> What motivates you to go out walking?


Not in order of importance:

[1] Exercise
[2] The 'buzz' of reaching the summit, no matter how small.
[3] 'Ticking' another one whether it be a Nuttal, Marilyn, Wainwright,
etc
[4] The view (although today it was non-existant)
[5] Feeling everyday troubles dissolve away, the only important thing
is getting to the 'summit' or back to the car, etc
[6] Learning about the natural world, geogology, meterology, geography,
flora & fauna.

Paul Saunders wrote:
> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather,


Can't claim to be a go out in all weathers type , just take advantage
of the circumstances. If near the hills it would take very poor
weather conditions not to go out at all, just would tailor the walk to
a lower, less strenuous one.

Paul Saunders wrote:
>or to local areas you've visited many times before?


Nothing is 'local' when you're cast adrift in the middle of the Fens
but revisiting a hill is a mixture of [1], [2], [4], [5] & [6]. In the
past few months my most visited hill is Beacon Hill only 248m with no
classification, I just like it!

David

....119 summits this year so far
116 new (54 Marilyns, 42 Nuttalls, 43 Wainwrights, 9 Outliers)
3 repeats (1 Marilyn, 2 Nuttalls, 2 Wainwrights)
 
M

Martin

Guest
"There's no such thing as bad weather : just the wrong clothes" .. Billy
Connelly


"Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
What motivates you to go out walking?

And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
you've visited many times before?

Paul
 
S

sandy saunders

Guest
> What motivates you to go out walking?

Love of the outdoors and gallons and gallons of fresh air
.................... all for free. Also, we live in a very beautiful
country. Most of my walking is on the South Downs, with a few trips a year
to the Lake District. While we may not have the height on in the south,
each location has its special beauty. The mountains give stunning feeling
of wilderness (although close to Civilisation!), and the rolling farmland
downs presenting different patterns from their crops.

> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
> you've visited many times before?


The weather contributes to the scenery. Contrast a snowy winter walks (not
often down south, I know) with a bright summers day. All the colours are
enhanced in one way or another. Then there are the dark overcast days,
bleak but merging the sky and ground into one. The rain! Well, anytime it
isn't very pleasant, but the saying goes 'you can only get wet as far as the
skin .......' Boom .......... Boom ..........

Yes, the joys and happiness of walking.

--
sandy saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk
email: saunders.sandy at ntlworld.com

'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still
brings the same excitement'
 
M

Mike Clark

Guest
In message <[email protected]>
"Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote:

> What motivates you to go out walking?


I spend most of my week cooped up in an office and a laboratory. I like
being outside, I like looking around at the landscapes and the wildlife.
I also like the challenge of physical exercise and mental problem
solving. Exploring is fun, and you can explore even quite local areas of
countryside close to urban areas, and see and appreciate things that few
others do. As a kid I used to wander the Wiltshire/Somerset countryside
on bicycle and on foot, often alone, just studying the world and
exploring.

>
> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather,


Setting off in bad weather (i.e. wet) is sometimes a barrier. I've got
no problem with windy, cold or snowy conditions. It's rarely a problem
if the weather changes once I'm out, so the trick is to set off between
storms!

> or to local areas you've visited many times before?


That's easy. The same place is never the same, and comparing the
differences, or finding something you hadn't noticed before is what is
fun.

>
> Paul
>
>


Mike
--
o/ \\ // |\ ,_ o Mike Clark
<\__,\\ // __o | \ / /\, "A mountain climbing, cycling, skiing,
"> || _`\<,_ |__\ \> | immunology lecturer, antibody engineer and
` || (_)/ (_) | \corn computer user"
 
D

Dave McLaughlin

Guest
Paul Saunders wrote:
> What motivates you to go out walking?


Wish I knew. Whatever it is, I seem to have lost it. I've been
suffering with a really bad dose of CBA (Can't Be Ar$*d)recently, and I
don't seem to be able to shake it off. I think it's down to spending
too much time in work and/or on the A1/M1 etc.

The promised cold snap seems to have hit Teesside today, and the current
windchill is -10.9C so things might be a bit wintery on the North York
Moors over the weekend. Hopefully that will get me going again!!

--
Dave McLaughlin

**** Sapiens Non Urinat In Ventum
 
B

Bryan Hall

Guest
1. The movement through the surrounding landscape
2. Peace 'n quiet away from everyone/thing else
3. Nature watching

I've mentioned it before but it bears a repeat - try to track down a copy of
Shank's Pony by Morris Marples (1959) - the guy goes into all the why do we
do it in some lovely and empathic detail

"Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> What motivates you to go out walking?
>
> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local areas
> you've visited many times before?
>
> Paul
>
>
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
Thanks for the replies so far.

I should perhaps explain my question in a little more detail. I'm
interested in finding the reasons that make us get up off our arses to go
out in the first place, rather than what we enjoy about it when we get
there.

Now these may be one and the same thing, the pleasure of the walk may be the
very thing that motivates you to go out walking, but on the other hand they
may not.

In my case, I've been suffering from a motivation problem in recent times
(as some might have guessed), and been going out a lot less as a result.
But the crazy thing is that every time I do go out, I thoroughly enjoy it
and find myself wishing I did it more often. But then the next time, I
can't get up off my ****, even though I know I'd enjoy it if I did. So what
on earth is going on here?

One possiblity is being distracted by other things, and the computer is good
at doing that as we all know, but it's not just that.

Anthony Robbins reckons that humans do things for one of two reasons, either
to gain pleasure or to avoid pain, and whichever of the two desires is
stronger tends to win out. Also he says, as a general rule, the desire to
avoid pain tends to be stronger than the desire to gain pleasure.

So in my case, obviously I stand to gain pleasure from going out walking,
but the desire to avoid the "pain" of going out seems to be stronger. What
is this pain? Well there's the hassle of getting packed and ready to go,
the hassle of driving there and back and dealing with traffic etc, plus the
physical effort that's involved in actually getting up off my **** and doing
it! (this was never a problem in the past - I put that down to my poor
fitness level now).

Anyway, the solution is simple, in theory - I need to associate more
pleasure with walking than pain. So how do I do that exactly? This is the
reason I asked the question, I'm trying to think of ways to associate more
pleasure with the thought of going out walking, and I'm hoping that a few
ideas may inspire me.

I certainly didn't associate the same feelings that I do now when I was
younger. More on that later, in answer to another post.

Paul
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
Roger wrote:

> Always been a bit of a puzzle to me but whatever it is I has been
> sufficiently strong in the past to get me out in the worst of weathers
> and to keep me walking when every step was agony.


That's fascinating. Could it be because you don't have anything better to
do? No other interests?

I've only climbed Fan Brycheiniog a fraction of the times that you have, but
often get bored with the thought of climbing it again (but never bored when
actually doing it). Where do you get the desire from to climb it again?
Simply because it's there?

Paul
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
josoap wrote:

> Anything to get away from the 'trouble and strife


Ah, now here we have the first example of doing it "to avoid pain". ;-)

That was quite a common reason for me many years back in one particular
relationship. Not to get away from her but to get away from the damn TV!

Paul
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:

>> What motivates you to go out walking?

>
> Potentially high blood pressure and thus the alternative of exercising
> or of taking pills forever.


Another "to avoid pain" answer.

>> And what keeps you motivated to go out in bad weather, or to local
>> areas you've visited many times before?

>
> See above! Actually a quiet stroll around Brown Clee Hill is a chance
> to get away from it all for ~4 hours, listen to music on my MP3
> player, maybe meet some interesting people/animals, and see what has
> changed. The view is NEVER the same, even if you're there every day.


This is true. Oddly I tend to forget this when planning walks. I look at
my same old maps and blankly assume the walk and the photos will be the much
the same, even though they never are. It's not that I don't know this, but
I rarely remember to factor it into a walk.

I must make a point of remembering that, thank you! "What new and
unexpected things might happen in this familar place this time?"

> Local areas also have the benefit I can start/finish at home, know
> how long it's going to take almost exactly, and plot routes which are
> mostly walkable in trainers (if I feel like it) or which pass
> conveniently near a pub. 8>.


Ah, the pub factor. That's something I'm trying to avoid!

> Mostly I try to walk new areas though .. motivation for that is the
> GPS mapping of (Southern) Shropshire, and the 85% still not walked
> even once. {The de-motivation is the fact that the paths and
> conditions of paths changes faster than I can keep up with, so it's a
> bit like painting that bridge ..}


Constant challenge is a requirement in life apparently, if we are to remain
interested in it, otherwise things become dull, boring and pointless. So in
a way I guess it's good to work on a project that you can never finish!

Paul
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
Simon Edwardes wrote:

> Sorry to be the first to admit it, but reaching the summits and
> ticking them off a list is a big factor. Must be, because I'm not
> that bothered about low-level walks or just going out for a stroll -
> I must have an objective. I also tend not to revisit places for the
> same reason.


A very valid point of view, and I'm glad you mentioned it. As we all know,
the very activity of list ticking leads you to places that you may not
otherwise have visited, and that's what really gives you pleasure, isn't it?
I mean if all you really wanted to do was tick things off lists, you could
do that at home, you wouldn't need to actually go out or anything, right?

> Having said that, I also love the scenery, views, route-planning,
> maps, taking photos, using GPS, staying in B&Bs, a pint and a pub-meal
> afterwards, etc.


Exactly. So the ticking motivates you to go out, but it's not actually the
main source of pleasure.

That may be one of my main problems. Exploring the unknown was probably my
biggest motivation in my early years, but now I've got nowhere new to go
without travelling a fair distance. I've just got nothing new to explore in
my "local" area. Occasional long trips are not a problem, but I can't very
well drive to Snowdonia three times a week for a regular stroll, now can I?

Of course, when I say there's nowhere new to go locally, I don't mean I've
been everywhere, I just mean I've been to all the main locations of
interest. There are countless nooks and crannies that I've never explored,
and I tried to systematically do that once, many years ago, but I found
myself getting locked into a sequence of diminishing returns. Every walk I
did was crappier than the previous one, and I gradually realised that it
made no sense to waste so much time exploring boring locations just because
I'd never been there before, it was actually more fun to go back the the
good locations that I had.

So what I really need to motivate myself is good locations that I've never
visited before. So what I really need to do is move, and simply change my
local area.

> Bad weather is a big turn-off (hence I usually don't book anything
> more than 5 days in advance),


Same here usually, but sometimes I enjoy it if I'm in the mood for a
challenge. That seems to be happening less these days though, probably
because I'm so unfit. In the past I found that I could really enjoy bad
weather if I got into the right frame of mind for it, treating it as a
challenge.

> I too find the prospect of the drive (more like 3-4 hours for me) a
> bigger obstacle than the mountains.


Well I don't have to drive that far for decent hills, but I do have to drive
that far for decent ones that I haven't climbed before.

Paul