What muscles ache

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by DaveB, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    hippy wrote:
    >
    > I always had trouble with overdoing stretches "cold" before
    > a run (when I used to attempt to run) so I stopped and
    > found that doing them afterwards with warmed muscles
    > was less risky.
    >
    >


    Me too. I found the best warmup for running was the fact that I run so
    slow. In fact I think my running could almost be seen as a warmup for
    stretching for riding.

    DaveB
     


  2. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "DaveB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > What did you get in the way of hamstring stretches? Is it something you
    > can explain in a post or do we need to cover a stretching program in the
    > next BR. My favourite hamstring stretch at the moment is to lie in a
    > doorway and put one leg at a time up on the doorframe, pushing against
    > the frame, and then each stretch moving a bit closer to the frame. Now
    > that the half marathon is over I've got a deep tissue massgae happening
    > tomorrow which I'm not looking forward to. Hopefully I'll be in good
    > shape for Sunday.


    There are no stupid questions, right? (just stupid people)..
    What exactly is a "deep tissue massage" and does
    it have any actual benefit?

    A nice rub from someone (preferably opposite sex,
    scantily clad, etc, etc.. ) is good but perhaps not
    useful for improving muscle performance?
    Does a deep tissue massage simply involve applying
    more pressure to the muscles?

    The stretching routine I received from my physio took
    about 30min to get through, typically doing two 20sec
    holds on each limb/area. Zero pain after race today
    which could be the stretching? I just checked and the
    speed today was only marginally lower than last week.

    hippy
     
  3. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    hippy wrote:

    >
    > There are no stupid questions, right? (just stupid people)..
    > What exactly is a "deep tissue massage" and does
    > it have any actual benefit?


    This is based on the masseur I see so others may vary, but it's largely
    based on pressure points. The theory is that if you apply significant
    pressure to those points the muscle gets overloaded and goes from very
    stressed to very relaxed. I used it in the past as a migraine prevention
    on some key muscles around the neck. The thing with it is, that it
    really puts those muscles through a workout, so it's not the sort of
    thing you would do just before a big event. AT the end of a half hr
    session I'm nackered, but the muscles that were tight are now very relaxed.

    I use it for nagging injuries that won't come good, like my current
    hamstring problem.

    DaveB
     
  4. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    hippy wrote:
    > There are no stupid questions, right? (just stupid people)..
    > What exactly is a "deep tissue massage" and does
    > it have any actual benefit?
    >
    > A nice rub from someone (preferably opposite sex,
    > scantily clad, etc, etc.. ) is good but perhaps not
    > useful for improving muscle performance?
    > Does a deep tissue massage simply involve applying
    > more pressure to the muscles?
    >

    <snip>

    Relaxation massage loosens surface muscles, gets some blood into them
    and into the skin and makes you feel pretty good

    Deep tissue massage gets rid of the deep knots and waste products in
    your muscles. It leaves you tired and sore, sometimes bruised, and
    you'll feel a bit flat for about 24 hours. If I reach a "can't do the
    splits" day I go get deep tissue massage and loosen up my hip flexors
    and glutes and can do them again. They help you recover, and in a few
    days you feel brilliant!

    Hardest decision I made wrt running was when my calves were massively
    knotted 3 days out from a half marathon. They had been cramping every
    time I ran, but I knew if I got them worked on I would be bruised for
    the race. I told the massage therapist to hit them as hard as he needed,
    so he got stuck in with his elbows. They were bruised and sore, but at
    least they didn't cramp during the race.
     
  5. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hardest decision I made wrt running was when my calves were massively
    > knotted 3 days out from a half marathon. They had been cramping every
    > time I ran, but I knew if I got them worked on I would be bruised for
    > the race. I told the massage therapist to hit them as hard as he needed,
    > so he got stuck in with his elbows. They were bruised and sore, but at
    > least they didn't cramp during the race.


    Standard training/racing pain not enough for you guys?

    hippy
    it must be a running thing ;-)
     
  6. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    hippy wrote:
    >
    > "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hardest decision I made wrt running was when my calves were massively
    > > knotted 3 days out from a half marathon. They had been cramping every
    > > time I ran, but I knew if I got them worked on I would be bruised for
    > > the race. I told the massage therapist to hit them as hard as he needed,
    > > so he got stuck in with his elbows. They were bruised and sore, but at
    > > least they didn't cramp during the race.

    >
    > Standard training/racing pain not enough for you guys?
    >
    > hippy
    > it must be a running thing ;-)


    It's one of those hurt now, not later things. If I don't get stuff
    worked on, I run awkwardly and do damage. I notice it on my bike, but I
    wonder if I would notice it if I hadn't seen it in running first.

    T
     
  7. Claes

    Claes New Member

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    I have read from a pro cyclist, interested in ergo on the bike, that if your hams burn most, particularly after a climb, you are sitting too far back, if you quads hurt more, too far forward. Not sure if this is it though.
    I just got back on a bike and get pain in the absolut top of the calf. Both sides. I hope it is just due to not being used to cycling, but I was off the bike for a month due to a trip to Europe, and the pain just disappeared at the end of the month, today back on the bike I felt it just slightly at the start. I would appreciate any tips. Does not hurt when stretching, but I can sometimes feel it when walking. Not sure what it is.
     
  8. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Claes wrote:
    >
    > I have read from a pro cyclist, interested in ergo on the bike, that if
    > your hams burn most, particularly after a climb, you are sitting too
    > far back, if you quads hurt more, too far forward. Not sure if this is
    > it though.
    > I just got back on a bike and get pain in the absolut top of the calf.
    > Both sides. I hope it is just due to not being used to cycling, but I
    > was off the bike for a month due to a trip to Europe, and the pain just
    > disappeared at the end of the month, today back on the bike I felt it
    > just slightly at the start. I would appreciate any tips. Does not hurt
    > when stretching, but I can sometimes feel it when walking. Not sure
    > what it is.
    >
    > --
    > Claes


    Sounds like peroneus problems. Dig your thumb in above where it's sore,
    pushing it into the bone, and move your foot around for about 30
    seconds. Adjust your thumb position to move down your leg and repeat.
    It's usually due to either tight ITB or too much ankle movement (from
    e.g. overpronation)
     
  9. Claes

    Claes New Member

    Joined:
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    Huh? I do not pronate at all, I suppinate, at least when walking and running.
    What do you mean whey you say the ankle moves to much? In what direction, horisontal or vertical or?
    What is the ITB? I am not a native english speaker so go gentle on me.
    You seem to know what you are talking about and I really appreciate your advice.

    Cheers.
     
  10. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Claes wrote:
    >
    > Tamyka Bell Wrote:
    > >
    > > Sounds like peroneus problems. Dig your thumb in above where it's
    > > sore,
    > > pushing it into the bone, and move your foot around for about 30
    > > seconds. Adjust your thumb position to move down your leg and repeat.
    > > It's usually due to either tight ITB or too much ankle movement (from
    > > e.g. overpronation)

    > Huh? I do not pronate at all, I suppinate, at least when walking and
    > running.
    > What do you mean whey you say the ankle moves to much? In what
    > direction, horisontal or vertical or?
    > What is the ITB? I am not a native english speaker so go gentle on me.
    > You seem to know what you are talking about and I really appreciate
    > your advice.
    >
    > Cheers.


    I may seem to know what I'm talking about but it's personal experience
    not professional knowledge so if other people disagree listen to them,
    they're probably smarter :)

    Supination would make more sense... I get peroneus problems when running
    in shoes with too much pronation control i.e. they roll me out too far.
    The problem for me is that the muscles need to work hard to roll my
    ankle back in, so my lateral side gets sore.

    In cycling this would translate to lots of lateral movement in the
    ankle, possible combined with excessive vertical movement but more
    likely to be teamed with weird knee movement. I think the biggest thing
    that has helped me is to focus on knees moving in a straight line and
    let your ankles do what they have to. If your cleats don't have lateral
    movement consider getting ones that do to allow the foot to move as it
    needs to, to prevent tension in the muscles.

    ITB is iliotibial band. It runs down the outside of your thigh from your
    hip (front and back - the Tensor Fascia Latae (sp?) and Gluteals) to
    your tibia (the big shin bone) and can grate on the outside of your knee
    if it gets too tight. If you haven't had ITB probs running it's unlikely
    you would get them cycling.

    Your english as a second language looks better than my native english!

    T
     
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