What old rigid MTB has front and rear eyelets?



M

Mr. Les

Guest
Gooserider wrote:
> I'm thinking about building up an old steel MTB as a drop bar bike, and I'd
> like to mount fenders and a rack. My current fendered bike is 52cm and I
> have TCO(toe clip overlap). It's not a big deal but I don't like it. My
> thinking is a MTB won't have this problem. Steel and lugged would be great,
> but TIG steel is good. I know about the 99 Trek 970, any others?


Ah, a chance to sing the praises of my '86 Schwinn Cimmaron. This is a
great bike. Ned Overend rode one for many of his wins, back in the
day. 4130 Double butted, lugged. Fillet brazed head tube, full
eyelets and low-rider front rack bosses. A few years back I completely
upgraded to 9 spd. Deore LX. I run a road cluster for rail-trails
these days. Also went to narrow rims and replaced the Araya
RM-25...yes, 25s! They were bullet proof. This has been a terrific
bike for me. Highly regarded in '86
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
SMS <[email protected]> wrote:

> mark wrote:
> > Gooserider wrote:
> >> I'm thinking about building up an old steel MTB as a drop bar bike,
> >> and I'd like to mount fenders and a rack. My current fendered bike is
> >> 52cm and I have TCO(toe clip overlap). It's not a big deal but I don't
> >> like it. My thinking is a MTB won't have this problem. Steel and
> >> lugged would be great, but TIG steel is good. I know about the 99 Trek
> >> 970, any others?
> >>

> > e-bay is full of rigid steel mountain bike frames and complete bikes,
> > most of the mountain bikes made before the mid 90s had fender eyelets. I
> > just scored a Bridgestone MB-3 frame and fork (Ritchey Logic lugged
> > steel frame) with fender eyelets that I don't think has ever been
> > ridden. I'm building it up with fenders, a rear rack, studded tires and
> > a hub generator lighting system to get to and from work in the winter.
> >
> > Most modern road and touring bikes don't have TCO, how old is your bike?

>
> The compact frames may have TCO, and are pretty common on road bikes,
> though they don't exists, AFAIK, on touring bikes.


Don't know what constitutes modern, but I have a very pretty Miyata 210
(27" wheel) tourer from somewhere in the 1980s, and while it was fine
before I put fenders on, I now kick the front fender sometimes.

I use this bike as a commuter, so I tend to kick the fender while
trackstanding because I forget and let the pedals go level. Yes, I am
bad at trackstands.

This is something of a worst-case scenario for TCO, though: 27" wheel,
fattish tire, ~52cm frame, and I mount my cleats fairly far back on my
shoes, maximizing the potential for this problem.

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
On Mon, 02 Oct 2006 17:44:44 +0000, Booker C. Bense wrote:

> Pretty much every MTB made before suspension forks became
> standard in the late 80's/early 90's. I have a Gary Fisher
> Hoo Koo E Koo from 1988 that fits this description perfectly.
> Here's a picture of it in action.
>
> http://www.stanford.edu/~bbense/bike.jpg


A lot of race bikes of that era had no eyelets in the name of weight
shaving or whatever.

I mentioned Diamondback because they're really common and not
trendy/collectible/overpriced like Bridgestone. You can pick up an old
Apex or whatever for $200 or less.

Matt O.