What order do road bike parts seize in...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Apr 18, 2006.

  1. Starting with the pedals of course?
     
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  2. bfd

    bfd Guest

    Why do road bike parts seize? If you *grease* any and all "metal to
    metal" contact, like pedal threads, you should have any "seizing" going
    on.

    Of course, we can start the I grease/you don't grease/we all grease bb
    spindle to crank interface. But that should be another thread!
    Grease/Dry, Grease/Dry, Grease/Dry!
     
  3. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 18 Apr 2006 13:47:14 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >Starting with the pedals of course?


    Nope. Start with the threads of the screws in the bottle cage mounts.
    Then the seat post in the frame, and the BB cups in the BB shell.
    (The order may vary.)

    I've never had a roadie moving part sieze. Lube makes that a
    non-problem. (They'll still wear out and get sloppy, but not sieze.)
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  4. bfd

    bfd Guest

    Opps, that should be if you grease your threads, you should NOT have
    any "seizing" going on.
     
  5. On 18 Apr 2006 13:47:14 -0700, [email protected]
    wrote:

    >Starting with the pedals of course?


    Dear Michael,

    Apart from fasteners, like the steel pedals that someone
    forgot to coat with anti-seize before installing in aluminum
    cranks, bicycle parts don't seize in the more common sense
    of the word, which involves moving parts. Bike parts may
    wear and rattle, but they usually keep grinding along
    instead of seizing up.

    For a moving-part "seize" (as opposed to mere corrosion like
    pedals and seat posts), see tip #14 for motorcyclists
    planning to buzz along Scottish highways for a week on
    trials machines intended for walking speeds:

    "If you seize the piston, don't panic. Let the engine cool
    down a little and try and push the kick start down. If the
    kick-start is absolutely solid, you're in trouble!"

    http://www.ssdt.org/sitebody/modules/UploadIt/files/GasGas Pro Checklist.pdf

    A seat-post seized in a frame or a pedal seized in a crank
    just isn't the same as the pedal refusing to move when you
    stand on it.

    But to offer a bicycling example that may not otherwise be
    mentioned, it's annoying to try to unscrew a Presta valve
    nut on a Slime tube, only to have the whole assembly unscrew
    because the Presta valve was tighter than the removable body
    that allows filling the tube with Slime at the factory.

    Whoosh!

    Cheers,

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. bfd wrote:
    > Opps, that should be if you grease your threads, you should NOT have
    > any "seizing" going on.


    What about Tapirs?
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  7. [email protected] wrote:
    > On 18 Apr 2006 13:47:14 -0700, [email protected]
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Starting with the pedals of course?

    >
    > Dear Michael,
    >
    > Apart from fasteners, like the steel pedals that someone
    > forgot to coat with anti-seize before installing in aluminum
    > cranks, bicycle parts don't seize in the more common sense
    > of the word, which involves moving parts. Bike parts may
    > wear and rattle, but they usually keep grinding along
    > instead of seizing up.
    >
    > For a moving-part "seize" (as opposed to mere corrosion like
    > pedals and seat posts), see tip #14 for motorcyclists
    > planning to buzz along Scottish highways for a week on
    > trials machines intended for walking speeds:
    >
    > "If you seize the piston, don't panic. Let the engine cool
    > down a little and try and push the kick start down. If the
    > kick-start is absolutely solid, you're in trouble!"
    >
    > http://www.ssdt.org/sitebody/modules/UploadIt/files/GasGas Pro Checklist.pdf
    >
    > A seat-post seized in a frame or a pedal seized in a crank
    > just isn't the same as the pedal refusing to move when you
    > stand on it.
    >
    > But to offer a bicycling example that may not otherwise be
    > mentioned, it's annoying to try to unscrew a Presta valve
    > nut on a Slime tube, only to have the whole assembly unscrew
    > because the Presta valve was tighter than the removable body
    > that allows filling the tube with Slime at the factory.
    >
    > Whoosh!
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Carl Fogel


    Holy shit, he's back!
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  8. Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:

    [snip]
    > > Cheers,
    > >
    > > Carl Fogel

    >
    > Holy shit, he's back!
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training


    Yay! Welcome back, Carl. Hope we treat you better here this time! :)
     
  9. landotter

    landotter Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > bfd wrote:
    > > Opps, that should be if you grease your threads, you should NOT have
    > > any "seizing" going on.

    >
    > What about Tapirs?



    You hold it down, I'll grease it.
     
  10. Neil Brooks

    Neil Brooks Guest

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 20:21:55 -0400, "Phil, Squid-in-Training"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >bfd wrote:
    >> Opps, that should be if you grease your threads, you should NOT have
    >> any "seizing" going on.

    >
    >What about Tapirs?


    Technically, they aren't native to Grease.

    They tend to be from Central and South America, and--to a lesser
    degree--Southeast Asia.

    YW.
     
  11. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 16:30:27 -0600, [email protected] wrote:

    >On 18 Apr 2006 13:47:14 -0700, [email protected]
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Starting with the pedals of course?

    >
    >Dear Michael,
    >
    >Apart from fasteners, like the steel pedals that someone
    >forgot to coat with anti-seize before installing in aluminum
    >cranks, bicycle parts don't seize in the more common sense
    >of the word, which involves moving parts. Bike parts may
    >wear and rattle, but they usually keep grinding along
    >instead of seizing up.
    >
    >For a moving-part "seize" (as opposed to mere corrosion like
    >pedals and seat posts), see tip #14 for motorcyclists
    >planning to buzz along Scottish highways for a week on
    >trials machines intended for walking speeds:
    >
    >"If you seize the piston, don't panic. Let the engine cool
    >down a little and try and push the kick start down. If the
    >kick-start is absolutely solid, you're in trouble!"
    >
    >http://www.ssdt.org/sitebody/modules/UploadIt/files/GasGas Pro Checklist.pdf
    >
    >A seat-post seized in a frame or a pedal seized in a crank
    >just isn't the same as the pedal refusing to move when you
    >stand on it.
    >
    >But to offer a bicycling example that may not otherwise be
    >mentioned, it's annoying to try to unscrew a Presta valve
    >nut on a Slime tube, only to have the whole assembly unscrew
    >because the Presta valve was tighter than the removable body
    >that allows filling the tube with Slime at the factory.
    >
    >Whoosh!
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >Carl Fogel



    FOGELLLLLLL! FO-GEL! FO-GEL! FO-GEL!

    Yee-haah, the wordslinger is *back*!


    (Yes, Jobst, we know, *you* see no reason for jollity.)
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  12. Llatikcuf

    Llatikcuf Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >
    > Whoosh!
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Carl Fogel


    Welcome back Carl! We missed you.

    -nate
     
  13. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    landotter wrote:
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    >
    >>bfd wrote:
    >>
    >>>Opps, that should be if you grease your threads, you should NOT have
    >>>any "seizing" going on.

    >>
    >>What about Tapirs?

    >
    >
    >
    > You hold it down, I'll grease it.


    Never try to teach^h^h^h^h^h grease a pig^h^h^ tapir to^h^h
    sing^h^h^h^h, it wastes your time and it annoys the pig^h^h^h tapir.

    Mark
     
  14. Llatikcuf

    Llatikcuf Guest

    landotter wrote:
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > > bfd wrote:
    > > > Opps, that should be if you grease your threads, you should NOT have
    > > > any "seizing" going on.

    > >
    > > What about Tapirs?

    >
    >
    > You hold it down, I'll grease it.


    I'll help, we do not want our tapirs fretting.

    -nate
     
  15. Ho ho ho, all very hilarious of course, but suppose a new cyclist comes
    back from the LBS with a lovely shiny new road bike, rides about in
    less-than-perfect weather, then attemps some DIY maintenance, which
    parts will be found to be seized first?

    Or, to put it another way, if the same cyclist wanted to preempt later
    difficulties what order should new bikes be disassembled, treated with
    some type of anti-seize technology and reassembled?
     
  16. bfd

    bfd Guest

    Isn't that the job of the LBS? You're automatically assuming that the
    LBS has done a poor job of assembling. A "lovely shiny new road bike"
    from an LBS should have been properly assembled with the correct
    grease/anti-seize. A properly assembled bike should easily be able to
    withstand any "less-than-perfect weather."

    IF not, find yourself a new LBS!
     
  17. On 20 Apr 2006 13:00:46 -0700, [email protected]
    wrote:

    >
    >Ho ho ho, all very hilarious of course, but suppose a new cyclist comes
    >back from the LBS with a lovely shiny new road bike, rides about in
    >less-than-perfect weather, then attemps some DIY maintenance, which
    >parts will be found to be seized first?
    >
    >Or, to put it another way, if the same cyclist wanted to preempt later
    >difficulties what order should new bikes be disassembled, treated with
    >some type of anti-seize technology and reassembled?


    Dear Michael,

    Pedals and seat posts appear to be the most common
    complaints on RBT about corrosion seizing.

    Carbon seat posts and frames are an exception. Carbon fiber
    doesn't get along with most of the greases that people
    mistakenly use:

    "Some greases may attack the resin; don't grease the
    seatpost with anything that Specialized doesn't explicitly
    endorse for that purpose."

    http://groups.google.com/group/rec.bicycles.tech/msg/ace0dda7fd68c82e

    Cheers,

    Carl Fogel
     
  18. Graham Steer

    Graham Steer Guest

    Bad whether does not in its self take too much of a toll on a bike. Normally
    all that is needed is a hose down then a bit of oil here and there. But here
    in the UK in winter the local authorities put loads of salt on the roads.
    This makes winter mud quite aggressive. If you do not meticulously clean
    your bike the first thing I find to go is the front mech. - either the mech.
    itself sticks or the cable in the cableway under the bottom bracket sticks.
    After that it is the rear mech., then the chain and the any low down exposed
    cables. It very rarely gets this far as the first failure to shift on the
    front mech. is my signal to give every thing a damn good clean and lube.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Ho ho ho, all very hilarious of course, but suppose a new cyclist comes
    > back from the LBS with a lovely shiny new road bike, rides about in
    > less-than-perfect weather, then attemps some DIY maintenance, which
    > parts will be found to be seized first?
    >
    > Or, to put it another way, if the same cyclist wanted to preempt later
    > difficulties what order should new bikes be disassembled, treated with
    > some type of anti-seize technology and reassembled?
    >
     
  19. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Ho ho ho, all very hilarious of course, but suppose a new cyclist comes
    > back from the LBS with a lovely shiny new road bike, rides about in
    > less-than-perfect weather, then attemps some DIY maintenance, which
    > parts will be found to be seized first?
    >
    > Or, to put it another way, if the same cyclist wanted to preempt later
    > difficulties what order should new bikes be disassembled, treated with
    > some type of anti-seize technology and reassembled?
    >


    Aluminum quill stems are very prone to seizing from corrosion, seatposts
    somewhat less. The solution is to clean and re-grease periodically.
     
  20. [email protected] wrote:
    > Starting with the pedals of course?


    Pull the clutch in, turn off the engine and coast to a stop. Call for help.
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
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