what parts needed to overhaul hubs HB 6207

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by nativewisdom, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. nativewisdom

    nativewisdom New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have just finished a lot of upgrades on a 1986 Miyata 912. The only things I didn't touch were the crank and bottom bracket, and the headset. Both still seem very solid.

    I would like to put new bearings in the hubs though.

    My rear and front hubs are HB 6207 and says it is a sealed mechanism.

    I saw some videos on line about how to change ball bearings, but not sure for the sealed mechanism.

    I am wondering what parts I need and also what size cone wrench to buy. Do I need a chain whip to do the rear hub?

    Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. nativewisdom

    nativewisdom New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    I thought having a sealed mechanism meant you didn't have to deal with individual ball bearings?

    Either way sounds simple enough, but I just thought there was a big difference with ball bearings and a sealed mechanism.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    125
    You will need CONE WRENCHES + WHITE LITHIUM GREASE and 18 1/4" bearings (for the rear ... 9 on each side) & 20 3/16" bearings (for the front hub).

    For your purposes, the "seal" is insignificant -- it refers to the plastic (?) shroud or metal cap that covers the bearings.

    I think that you may be thinking of "cartridge" bearings which may-or-may-not be sealed.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    125
    Without looking at a couple of hubs, I guess you will need a 15mm and a 14mm Cone Wrench ... you can usually use an adjustable wrench for the outer nut.
    To state what may be obvious, you only need to remove the lockking nut, spacer (if present) and cone on ONE SIDE (the non-driveside of the rear hub) to re-pack the bearings on a regular hub ... you know, then slide the axle/etc. out of the hub ... etc.
    You only need a chain whip if you are going to remove the Freewheel ... you will also need the appropriate Freewheel tool which will be specific to the brand of Freewheel you have on the wheel.

    IMO, removing the Freewheel is optional ... removal will probably expedites the process of cleaning out the old grease & re-inserting the bearings ... but, you should probably only do so if you find that inserting the new bearings is too tedious with the Freewheel in place.

    BTW. I recommend that you WORK OVER A LARGE BOX which will catch any parts/bearings which may fall away from the hub while you are working.
     
  5. jackson123

    jackson123 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2007
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    1
    looks like great suggestion
     
  6. nativewisdom

    nativewisdom New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks alfeng.

    I needed the 18 1/4" for the rear and 20 3/16" for the front. I needed a 13 mm cone for the front and a 15 mm for the rear. Bought a combo for $5 at EMS.

    I removed the freewheel with a shimano freewheel tool and do not need a chainwhip. I think those are only needed for cassettes.

    NEW-er PROBLEM

    My front wheel spins for ever and my back spins pretty good, but now there is a weird squeak coming from the rear, but I can't really isolate from where. It is particularly noticeable while I am peddling and doesn't squeak while the freewheel is just clicking. I replaced the freewheel today, but it whatever is squeaking squeaked with the old freewheel and the new one.

    The squeaking only began after my hub overhaul this past weekend so logic would indicate to begin there. Anyone have any suggestions of whether a squeak can be caused by loose or tight cones?
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    125
    Weird squeaking could be caused by almost anything ...

    The first thing I would try is adding a DROP OF OIL (e.g., 3-in-1 weight Household Oil) to the bushing of each pulley wheel on the rear derailleur.
     
  8. nativewisdom

    nativewisdom New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Alfeng, thanks again. I think it was that I didn't grease my dust cap present on the non-drive side. I found some other posts describing my situation and after I sprayed some lube in the crack of the dust cap the noise stopped.
     
Loading...
Loading...