What Should I Eat?

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by HansThompsonCycling, Aug 23, 2015.

  1. HansThompsonCycling

    HansThompsonCycling New Member

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    Hi there! I am puzzled as what I am to eat not just before, during, and after a ride, but on days I am not riding, when I am taking my classes (I'm in high school.) I know what to eat before, during, and after, but what do I eat on my "off days"? I will try to ride almost every day after school, depending on my schedule. If I can't ride each day, then I will ride on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday. But yeah, what should I eat daily when I am not riding or even the days I will go on a ride, what should I eat? For breakfast, lunch, and dinner?And snacks of course! Sorry if I didn't get to the point quickly. :) Thanks!
     
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  2. gavinfree

    gavinfree Member

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    Honestly, it all depends on what kind of cycling you want to get into. Are you looking for recreational rides? Do you want to do something competitive? Unless you're going for the competitive side or for endurance training, then I'd say you should eat whatever you want. Stick to mostly healthy things, and fuel up on the right foods/beverages during rides, and you shouldn't experience any issues with your regimen. I'm just not a believer in sticking to a set diet. If I'm close to a healthy diet, then that's good enough for me.
     
  3. BikeBikeBikeBike

    BikeBikeBikeBike Well-Known Member

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    I find eating food tends to be the best option.
     
  4. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    What you should eat on a day off the bike is secondary when compared to you starting a sentence with "But yeah."

    Just avoid eating junk and you'll be fine. Unless you're riding 50+ miles a day, you really don't need anything special. Just make sure you drink enough fluids.
     
  5. GemmaRowlands

    GemmaRowlands Member

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    It honestly depends on you as an individual. During my time cycling, I have known people who eat nothing at all until after they have finished cycling, and I know others who just eat a normal sized meal like they would any other day of the week. Most are somewhere between the two, though, and choose to have something small and then another snack part way through their ride if it happens to be a particularly long or difficult route that day. You should try out a few different ideas and see what works the best for you. Only you can create your own cycling plan; other people can't really tell you how you should be doing it.
     
  6. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    I think I have created a thread about breakfast. But anyway, this post reminds me of my younger days when milk and eggs were the sustenance for energy. Carbohydrates wasn't heard of and neither do proteins, and the only positive food nutrients we needed were vitamins. But back to milk and eggs, the egg is a complete meal so even just one boiled egg will see you through a 10-mile trip on your bike. And the milk is good for the bones so you also need that.
     
  7. sunshiney

    sunshiney Member

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    On days where I'm cycling, I try to only eat a light meal beforehand, something high in protein, and then have any bigger meals after.
    On my off days the diet stays pretty much the same, only the timing is different.
    For breakfast I always try to stick to protein like peanut butter or eggs.
    Carbs in the morning always leave me hungry and shaky a few hours later.
    Lots of whole grains are good, like wild rice and quinoa, especially when you're substituting them for foods high in carbs like white rice or pasta.
    Really, diet depends a lot on your lifestyle so it's hard to say what you should be eating without more details, but you can't go wrong with lean proteins, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables like kale.
     
  8. Runnerdo

    Runnerdo New Member

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    A bowl of my favorite cereal and a fruit works well for me. I avoid taking oily or heavy food as my tummy gets quesy at times.
     
  9. joshposh

    joshposh Banned

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    I can't take this question seriously. Sounds like an attempt to get his post count up. But to give you the benefit of the doubt, I'll answer it with the most current up to date nutritional information.

    Lots of people here are saying whole grains and cereals. You can cross those two off your list. Cereal is one of the reasons for the obesity problem in the USA. There is only one animal on the planet that can successfully survive of grains alone, and that is a bird. Humans need animal protein to maintain muscle mass and to develop proper brain function. You also need to get you micro nutrients and carbohydrates from raw vegetables.
     
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