What should I expect from a low carb diet?



N

Norm

Guest
How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights the
other days. Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?

Norm
 
D

David

Guest
"Norm" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?

Yes. Carb's are synonymous with energy. Protein is not a source of energy.

--
Nova Scotia, Canada
 
D

Donovan Rebbech

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Norm wrote:
> How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
> the other days. Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?

Depends on what you mean by "low carb". How many grams of carbs do you take each day ?

It might be a good idea to take some carbs just before your run, or to put it another way,
consolidate your daily carbs into one meal and run shortly after that meal (for example, you could
have 50gm of carbs or so in 1 meal, and run an hour or so after that)

FWIW, Lyle McDonald has written a few books (Ultimate Diet is the latest) on low carb diets that are
appropriate for people on demanding exercise programs. One of the main issues is making glycogen
available for exercise, yet keeping it low the rest of the time. You could post questions about
these books on misc.fitness.weights.

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
 
N

Norm

Guest
"Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, Norm wrote:
> > How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
> > the other days. Will the low carb diet
adversely
> > affect my energy level?
>
> Depends on what you mean by "low carb". How many grams of carbs do you
take
> each day ?
>
> It might be a good idea to take some carbs just before your run, or to put
it
> another way, consolidate your daily carbs into one meal and run shortly
after
> that meal (for example, you could have 50gm of carbs or so in 1 meal, and run an hour or so
> after that)
>
> FWIW, Lyle McDonald has written a few books (Ultimate Diet is the latest)
on
> low carb diets that are appropriate for people on demanding exercise
programs.
> One of the main issues is making glycogen available for exercise, yet
keeping
> it low the rest of the time. You could post questions about these books
on
> misc.fitness.weights.
>
> Cheers,
> --
> Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/

I would guess I'm taking in between 50 and 100 gms of carbs spread out over the day. I'll check out
the books and the NG. Thanks.

Norm
 
B

Bob Garrison

Guest
"Norm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
> the other days. Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?
>
> Norm
>

A better question is why do you want to be on a low carb diet?
 
S

Swstudio

Guest
"Bob Garrison" <[email protected]> wrote in message >
> "Norm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
> > the other days. Will the low carb diet
adversely
> > affect my energy level?
> >
> > Norm
> >
>
> A better question is why do you want to be on a low carb diet?

Because when done sensibly (not extreme), it is a way of losing weight. If done in conjunction with
exercise and other changes it works for many people.

cheers,
--
David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
 
R

Runmum

Guest
Norm wrote:
> How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
> the other days. Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?
>
> Norm
>
>

When I tried a low-carb diet, I ate most or all of my grain carbs before and after my run. I ran in
the morning, about the same amount as you do now. I had tea with milk before my run, then a carb
breakfast after. The rest of the day I ate mostly proteins and vegetables, e.g. a big salad with
tuna, eggs and spinach salad, chicken with lots of vegetables.

I didn't count carbs, just restricted them somewhat. I was still eating according to Canada's
food guide.

I felt great, lost weight and now eat more grain carbs because I run more.

Donna
 
L

Legend

Guest
"Norm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
> the other days. Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?
>
> Norm

My workout is very similar to yours Norm. I run (on a treadmill) 3.5 miles in 35 minutes, 3 or 4
times a week. Prior to my run I do weight training for 15 minutes.

I started the Atkins induction phase of low carb 7 days ago, which limits me to no more than 20
net (minus fiber) carbs per day. My nutrient intake per day, averaged out over the last week, is
as follows:

Total Calories: 2123 source grams cals %total Fat: 146 1318 63% Sat: 35 314 15% Carbs: 21 66 3%
Fiber: 5 0 0% Protein: 176 705 34%

I've had 3 workouts in the last 7 days, and I haven't had to curtail them at all. I was surprised at
how well I felt, considering my extremely low carb intake. Granted, my run is at a nice leisurely
pace, 6 mph for 35 minutes, but it's still a pretty decent workout for a 6'1" 260lb 44 year old.

I'm going to stay at induction level carb intake for a few more weeks, before I start to gradually
increase the carbs in my diet. I'll just pay attention to how I feel during and after my workouts to
see if my low carb intake affects my energy level. So far so good.

Good luck!

Dave
 
D

Donovan Rebbech

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Bob Garrison wrote:
>
> "Norm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>> How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes every other day and do weights
>> the other days. Will the low carb diet adversely affect my energy level?
>
> A better question is why do you want to be on a low carb diet?

I think it's safe to assume that the answer has something to do with weight control. Since carbs
make up most of our diet (in terms of calories), they are an obvious target for anyone hoping to
cut calories.

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
 
B

Bob Garrison

Guest
"Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, Bob Garrison wrote:
> >
> > "Norm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> >> How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes
every
> >> other day and do weights the other days. Will the low carb diet
adversely
> >> affect my energy level?
> >
> > A better question is why do you want to be on a low carb diet?
>
> I think it's safe to assume that the answer has something to do with
weight
> control. Since carbs make up most of our diet (in terms of calories), they
are
> an obvious target for anyone hoping to cut calories.
>
> Cheers,
> --
> Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/

Sure, but the bottom line for weight control (I assume we are talking about weight reduction) is
eating fewer calories than we burn. There is nothing magical about low carb. You can have 100% of
your calories coming from low carb and still gain weight.
 
B

Bob Garrison

Guest
"SwStudio" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Bob Garrison" <[email protected]> wrote in message >
> > "Norm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > > How will this affect my running. I currently run about 40 minutes
every
> > > other day and do weights the other days. Will the low carb diet
> adversely
> > > affect my energy level?
> > >
> > > Norm
> > >
> >
> > A better question is why do you want to be on a low carb diet?
>
>
> Because when done sensibly (not extreme), it is a way of losing weight. If done in conjunction
> with exercise and other changes it works for many people.
>
> cheers,
> --
> David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
>

See my answer to Donovan.
 
D

Donovan Rebbech

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Bob Garrison wrote:

> Sure, but the bottom line for weight control (I assume we are talking about weight reduction) is
> eating fewer calories than we burn.

Yes, and a low carb diet is one way to achieve that end (of consuming further calories). Indeed,
it's quite an effective way, according to most research on the topic.

Suppose you start with a 2000 calorie/day diet. If the macronutrient ratio is a 60:20:20, then you
have about 45gm fat, 270gm carb, and 90gm of protein. Which one is easier to cut back on ?

> There is nothing magical about low carb.

There is a lot of evidence that it is an effective way to control weight. To cut back on calories
and lose fat, you either need low fat, low carb, or a bit of both. The problem with going for "low
fat" is that you end up on a diet of food that tastes like cardboard very quickly. On the other
hand, it is quite easy to cut back substantially on carbs, by elimintating macronutrient-dense
carb foods.

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
 
D

Doug Freese

Guest
Lyndon wrote:

If you don't know how, I've got a picture for you:
>
> http://www.trackwest.org/images/teampic.jpg

And I thought you prefered track because you liked to run fast. You're a wolf in sheep's clothing,
Lyndon. I'm thinking about going back to the track for some, er, "fast stuff." ;)

How come the guys are in the front? Is there a requirement for the girls to register a 8.56547 on
the fox scale to get on the team?

--
Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
 
D

David

Guest
[email protected] (Miss Anne Thrope) wrote:

> Expect to be hungry.

Lord knows why I'm responding to High_Colonic... but you should actually expect the opposite.
Refined carbs cause the sugar rush/crash cycle that sends 'false' hunger signals to your brain...
which is why you want to reach for fiber-rich carbs. Also, protein is a good appetite supressant.

--
Nova Scotia, Canada
 
D

David

Guest
Ok... but it's main use in the body is for basics like muscle repair, hair, teeth, etc... my point
is that it doesn't create the gycogen stores you need for running.

In article <[email protected]>, "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote:

> David <[email protected]> wrote in news:user-435046.19340401022004 @news.hfx.eastlink.ca:
>
> > Protein is not a source of energy.
>
> If it contains calories, then it is a source of energy. Not as effecient as carbs, but a source.
>
> -Phil

--
Nova Scotia, Canada
 
M

Malcolm Ferguso

Guest
Donovan Rebbechi wrote:

>There is a lot of evidence that it is an effective way to control weight.
>
There's a lot of evidence missing about the long term effects of these starvation diets.

> To cut back on calories and lose fat, you either need low fat, low carb, or a bit of both.
>
Or how about smaller portion sizes? People eat too much. And they don't seem to recognise the
effects of grazing.

> The problem with going for "low fat" is that you end up on a diet of food that tastes like
> cardboard very quickly.
>

I find sufficient fat in a meal makes it more filling (i.e. smaller portion will do) and leaves me
feeling satisified for longer. The proper answer is of course to eat a balanced diet coupled with a
healthy lifestyle (ie. sufficient exercise) and eating small enough portions that calories-in is in
perspective with calories-out.

Cheers, Malc
 
B

Bob Garrison

Guest
"Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>, Bob Garrison wrote:
>
> > Sure, but the bottom line for weight control (I assume we are talking
about
> > weight reduction) is eating fewer calories than we burn.
>
> Yes, and a low carb diet is one way to achieve that end (of consuming
further
> calories). Indeed, it's quite an effective way, according to most research
on
> the topic.
>
> Suppose you start with a 2000 calorie/day diet. If the macronutrient ratio
is
> a 60:20:20, then you have about 45gm fat, 270gm carb, and 90gm of protein. Which one is easier to
> cut back on ?
>
> > There is nothing magical about low carb.
>
> There is a lot of evidence that it is an effective way to control weight.
To
> cut back on calories and lose fat, you either need low fat, low carb, or a
bit
> of both. The problem with going for "low fat" is that you end up on a diet
of
> food that tastes like cardboard very quickly. On the other hand, it is
quite
> easy to cut back substantially on carbs, by elimintating
macronutrient-dense
> carb foods.
>
> Cheers,
> --
> Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/

A low carb diet for a runner sounds dumb! Why not stay with 60:20:20 and eat smaller portions?
 
D

Donovan Rebbech

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, David wrote:
> Ok... but it's main use in the body is for basics like muscle repair, hair, teeth, etc... my point
> is that it doesn't create the gycogen stores you need for running.

What happens if you stop eating carbs ? Do you just drop dead or something ?

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/