What size wheel?



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Nick Forwood

Guest
Given a frame and it's measurements, how does one know what size wheel to purchase to fit that bike?
Which measurement is the crucial one?
 
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Nick Forwood

Guest
Ok. Ive contacted the seller and it's apaprently a 56cm frame.

The story behind the frame is that I thought it would be good to build my own bike and I went a bit
crazy when i saw this frame on ebay.

>It would seem odd, to say the least, that you have purchased a frame and are unable to discover
>what size wheels it was designed for. Ask the seller.
 
M

Michael Dart

Guest
"Nick Forwood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Ok. Ive contacted the seller and it's apaprently a 56cm frame.
>
> The story behind the frame is that I thought it would be good to build my own bike and I went a
> bit crazy when i saw this frame on ebay.
>
>
> >It would seem odd, to say the least, that you have purchased a frame and are unable to discover
> >what size wheels it was designed for. Ask the seller.
>

More info would help. What type frame? Road, mountain bike? What make, model? The 56cm frame tells
me you have a road frame but that could still mean a couple of sizes of wheels.

Mike - it's always good to build your own bike. :^)
 
A

Appkiller

Guest
Nick:

I hope this is a troll, but if not, please pay attention to the following.

Unless you are very smart and have access to a wide variety of specialized bicycle tools, the
purchase of a frame with the intent of building it up yourself is an exercise in frustration and
overspending for someone as obviously inexperienced in this as you are. In order for your to build
up a frame with, say, Ultegra level components, the build kit alone will be about $800 to $900
dollars (from mail-order, more from your lbs) - and you haven't had the headset and bb shell
chased/faced and bb/fork installed, much less gone back to your lbs seven times for the right size
this or that (at lbs prices).

Realize that unless you buy a very expensive frame, kitting it out will cost you at least two to
three times what you paid for the frame.

If you are already in possession of the frame, you need to seriously consider having someone build
it up for you - at a minimum, you need to have someone else install the headset/fork and bb/crank.
There are machining operations required by these installations that you don't want to do.

Hey, good luck - I also built my own from a frame I bought off e-bay - but I had/have a lot more
experience than you currently have. Take your time, ask a lot of questions of those who know (lbs,
the rec), and don't get discouraged when you make that seventeenth trip to the lbs.

App

"Nick Forwood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> Ok. Ive contacted the seller and it's apaprently a 56cm frame.
>
> The story behind the frame is that I thought it would be good to build my own bike and I went a
> bit crazy when i saw this frame on ebay.
>
>
> >It would seem odd, to say the least, that you have purchased a frame and are unable to discover
> >what size wheels it was designed for. Ask the seller.
 
A

Andrew Webster

Guest
[email protected] (Appkiller) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> Nick:
>
> I hope this is a troll, but if not, please pay attention to the following.
>
> Unless you are very smart and have access to a wide variety of specialized bicycle tools, the
> purchase of a frame with the intent of building it up yourself is an exercise in frustration and
> overspending for someone as obviously inexperienced in this as you are. In order for your to build
> up a frame with, say, Ultegra level components, the build kit alone will be about $800 to $900
> dollars (from mail-order,

agreed, ready built bikes are phenomenal value compared with components (why isn't it the same for
computers?)

> more from your lbs) - and you haven't had the headset and bb shell chased/faced and bb/fork
> installed, much less gone back to your lbs seven times for the right size this or that (at lbs
> prices).
>
This is sound advice on a new frame, at least get bb shell properly prepared and headset seated -
not possible without proper tools/experience.

Everything else you CAN do yourself (and take apart again and re-do if necessary). It is well worth
buying from a LBS as you can then ask advice and take it back for one the right sizeif needed -
worth the extra I'd say.
 
B

Bluto

Guest
[email protected] (Andrew Webster) wrote:

> This is sound advice on a new frame, at least get bb shell properly prepared and headset seated -
> not possible without proper tools/experience.

Finish machining on the BB shell is only necessary for Euro frames which are frequently shipped
either botched or unfinished. I have never run across a quality frame from the USA, Japan, or
Taiwan that required remachining the BB to function properly. At worst there is some paint
overspray to be removed.

Headsets are not a black art. They can be nicely installed with a large threaded rod and a couple of
nuts and washers, or with a mallet, or with a hammer and wood block. Mystifying this process serves
no good purpose for anyone with enough mechanical aptitude to do their own automotive filter and
plug changes.

Headsets such as Chris King that require special tooling and preparation are best avoided anyway;
they cost much more than necessary and fail to deliver any functional superiority compared to more
robust and inexpensive units.

Chalo Colina
 
H

Harris

Guest
Nick Forwood wrote:
> I'm aware of how rediculous this idea must seem, but I decided to build up my own bike mostly
> for educational purposes. Thanks to the advice I 've recieved here and in books I understand a
> little more what is required. I had always intended to ask lots of question and go to my local
> bike shop but I wanted to know a little more before I went in. The front fork is already
> attatched by the way.

Back in the late '70s, my local shop gave free classes on bike maintenance. During four classes they
showed you how to take a bike apart and put it together, how to repack bearings, adjust brakes,
headset, derailleurs, etc. Once you see what's involved, you realize it's not rocket science. I've
been building and maintaining my own bikes ever since.

> So I can clearly see that the bottom bracket and headset must be done by proffesionals.

Not necessarily. If the BB threads are clean, and the fork crown has been properly milled,
installing a BB and headset are not that hard.

Art Harris
 
N

Nick Forwood

Guest
I'm aware of how rediculous this idea must seem, but I decided to build up my own bike mostly for
educational purposes. Thanks to the advice I 've recieved here and in books I understand a little
more what is required. I had always intended to ask lots of question and go to my local bike shop
but I wanted to know a little more before I went in. The front fork is already attatched by the way.

So I can clearly see that the bottom bracket and headset must be done by proffesionals. This is
information I'm glad to have before I enter the shop.

>Hey, good luck - I also built my own from a frame I bought off e-bay - but I had/have a lot more
>experience than you currently have. Take your time, ask a lot of questions of those who know (lbs,
>the rec), and don't get discouraged when you make that seventeenth trip to the lbs.

Thankyou, I will persevere and keep you updated when things go well and ask assitance when
things go badly.

Nick
 
M

Matt J

Guest
"Nick Forwood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]ws-server.bigpond.net.au>...
> I'm aware of how rediculous this idea must seem, but I decided to build up my own bike mostly
> for educational purposes. Thanks to the advice I 've recieved here and in books I understand a
> little more what is required. I had always intended to ask lots of question and go to my local
> bike shop but I wanted to know a little more before I went in. The front fork is already
> attatched by the way.
>
> So I can clearly see that the bottom bracket and headset must be done by proffesionals. This is
> information I'm glad to have before I enter the shop.

If the fork is already installed, you needn't have a new headset installed, and perhaps you don't
need a stem either. The headset is the interface between the frame and fork, so if there's a fork
already installed on it, so is a headset. Whether you have a stem (connecting the fork's protrudence
through the frame to the handlbars) may depend on the type of headset
http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/howfix_headtypes.shtml Good luck! Matt
 
A

Appkiller

Guest
So how old, road or mtn, steel, cf, alum?

You've piqued my interest.

App

"Nick Forwood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> I'm aware of how rediculous this idea must seem, but I decided to build up my own bike mostly
> for educational purposes. Thanks to the advice I 've recieved here and in books I understand a
> little more what is required. I had always intended to ask lots of question and go to my local
> bike shop but I wanted to know a little more before I went in. The front fork is already
> attatched by the way.
>
> So I can clearly see that the bottom bracket and headset must be done by proffesionals. This is
> information I'm glad to have before I enter the shop.
>
> >Hey, good luck - I also built my own from a frame I bought off e-bay - but I had/have a lot more
> >experience than you currently have. Take your time, ask a lot of questions of those who know
> >(lbs, the rec), and don't get discouraged when you make that seventeenth trip to the lbs.
>
> Thankyou, I will persevere and keep you updated when things go well and ask assitance when things
> go badly.
>
> Nick
 
N

Nick Forwood

Guest
Appkiller wrote in message ...
>So how old, road or mtn, steel, cf, alum?
It's a road frame. Pretty certain it's aluminium. I'm not sure how old but I would suggest 3-4
years? Anyway I'll get the bike shop to have a look this weekend or on monday and ask him.
>You've piqued my interest.
>
>App
 
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