What surprised you when you switched to power?

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by bikeshop, Sep 20, 2005.

  1. bikeshop

    bikeshop New Member

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    A question for all those that have made the transition from training with h.r. to training with power.
    I am writing an article for a local club newsletter on making the switch to training with power. I wanted some feedback from those who have made the transition. What were some of the more suprising things you noticed when you switched? Problems you experienced? The good, the bad, any thoughts or experiences you would like to share that I might share with the club are much appreciated.:)
    Thanks
    Dave
    www.everybodysbikecoach.com
     
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  2. BlueJersey

    BlueJersey New Member

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    It takes a lot of work for this 130lb body to go 30 mph on the flat. Something like 350+ watts.

    I can do hill training to simulate race condition by producing the required wattage. It is not necessary for me to test ride a course. On a hill climb, if I can't produce so and so watts even with a lesser steeper hill around here, I will get dropped during the race.



     
  3. rmur17

    rmur17 New Member

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    have you read the FAQ and Power training guides written by Charles Howe with major input from A. Coggan et al??

    http://www.midweekclub.ca/articles/

    It would take me too long to start constructing a personal list !!

    rmur
     
  4. bikeshop

    bikeshop New Member

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    Sure have, but wanted so quotes and first hand experiences from a range of cyclist out there in computerland. Thanks! ;)
     
  5. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    You might want to look at this thread http://www.cyclingforums.com/t-260229-15-1.html. Subsequent to my thoughts at that time, I have lost even more confidence in my HRM as a proxy for intensity of effort and therefore as a way of precisely managing power during a race, especially a long race. For example, see this post http://www.cyclingforums.com/showpost.php?p=2253466&postcount=30. I think there are two distinctly different issues: training and racing. Some believe that a PM is not terribly useful for racing. I strongly believe otherwise, but presently available technology leaves a bit to be desired with respect to precise power management during a race. If that obstacle is somehow overcome, then I think a PM will become absolutely essential to achieving maximum performance in TTs and to a lesser extent in mass start races. Bringing the biggest engine to the race will remain the strategy of choice, but sometimes the guy with a somewhat smaller engine will beat the guy with the bigger engine because he does a better job of managing his smaller engine. I am personally committed to figuring out how to manage whatever power I have with as much precision as is humanly possible, whatever it takes. Every concept I am exploring is absolutely dependent on having power data available.
     
  6. Ausmith

    Ausmith New Member

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    Links on the above do not work. Any idea where this information can be found. Very interested.
     
  7. rmur17

    rmur17 New Member

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    hmmm ... some recent issue with the site. It was working a few days ago ,,,

    http://midweekclub.ca/powerFAQ.htm

    this should get you somewhere ....

    rmur
     
  8. flapsupcleanup

    flapsupcleanup New Member

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    I, for one, was shocked at how seemingly easy it is to produce big power numbers while climbing, but it feels killer hard to put out the same power on a downhill. I guess years of riding have conditioned me to hammer the hills and recover on the downs.


    Also, subtle changes in my mental process show up on the power output. For instance, if it is hot out, and I happen to go thru a patch of cooler air, my power goes up. If in my daydreaming while riding, I think of a ride where I got dropped, or where I was suffering, my power goes down.
     
  9. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Works for me...

    http://midweekclub.ca/articles/
     
  10. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    1) how much time on a typical ride (especially group rides) is spent at very low powers (~100w) or even coasting.

    2) How hard it is to maintain a high power level for the entire duration of an interval, compared to the effort required to maintain a high HR for the same time.

    3) How much power is required to maintain steady speed on even a small incline, and conversely how hard it is to maintain a high power output on a small decline.
     
  11. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    JL, 350watts in peanuts. Reading your statement that it is a huge amount of power is funny. Just be thankful you are a small dude and it doesn't take you 500+watts to go 30mph.

    I just sold my powermeter. It takes the fun away from the riding most of the time. Too much data. I think training with power is overrated. You do not need it. The only reason to use a powermeter is to accurately track progress.

    anybody else agree that powermeters are overrated?
     
  12. palewin

    palewin New Member

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    First, I disagree strongly that training with power is overrated. In fact, having been through the pre-HRM/pre-PM period, then the HRM period, and now using the PM, power training seems to me to be virtually the only way to train (assuming one can afford the PM; HRM training has its place as a compromise approach).

    You make two comments which support your view, but which I think set up "false standards." Training is not (for me at least) "fun." But what does that mean? It means that in a two-hour ride, I may have 30 minutes worth of structured intervals. Those 30 minutes are too intense to be fun; they are intended purely to improve my racing abilities. I find the PM virtually indespensable to make sure that for 30 minutes I'm not putting out too much effort to complete the interval, or too little for the interval to truly benefit me. The remaining 1 1/2 hours of riding are still fun, because during that part of the ride I'm not fixating on the power reading. Even if you forget about power, and think of a typical group ride, there are (again, at least for me) periods of the GR which aren't "fun" because I'm going flat out to stay with better riders than I am. The fun is the feeling of accomplishment when its over. I also don't belittle the value (and satisfaction) of using the PM to track progress. Racing has so many external variables that I need some other way to tell if my training is working; if my only gauge was podium finishes, I'd have to take up another sport...

    Lastly, 350 watts for a 130-lb rider isn't peanuts. If that's a max 5sec effort, you're right. But if that's a functional threshold (the 1-hr TT number, etc.), do the math - it works out at around 5.9 watts/kg, which is somewhere between national-class and world-class...
     
  13. robkit

    robkit New Member

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    what surprised me is the massive change in my attitude.

    i like measurable and realistic goals so what i love is the ability to track progress using numbers that cannot be subject to wind/terrain/weight and then compare those numbers with riders at higher levels.

    this just wasnt possible when i trained with HR alone. the guesswork and the grey areas are gone, consequently my motivation is up.

    i can now come out of a road race and, adding cycling peaks software into the equation, say "woah, i just set personal best power outputs at durations of 5 seconds, 15 seconds, 1 minute, 5 minutes..." instead of "woah, that was a tought/fast race, reckon i'm a bit fitter than last month".
     
  14. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    When I said 350watts is peanuts, I meant that is not much power for a short burst or sprint. I know 350watts at threshold for a 130lb person is very good.
     
  15. Ausmith

    Ausmith New Member

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    I get a 450 Policy Violation error....

    Anyway I can get my hands on these articles?

    Thanks
     
  16. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Sounds like an access issue with your work (?) Do you have another computer (home, library, etc.) that you could try from? Here's the biggie (IMO) from Andy Coggan, but I don't have any of the other aritcles saved aside from my bookmark to that site. http://www.peakscoachinggroup.com/PowerTrainingChapter.pdf

    Much of Andy's other info has made its way to that peakscoachinggroup.com site, so poke around there a bit for good stuff as well.
     
  17. Ausmith

    Ausmith New Member

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    This link worked just fine. Thanks.
     
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