what to do about...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Barry Gaudet, Jun 29, 2003.

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  1. Barry Gaudet

    Barry Gaudet Guest

    ...pollution?

    We went throught our first smog advisory earlier this week.

    *sigh*

    I avoided cycling except for commuting and tried to limit activity to very early morning.

    Anyone else have pollution coping strategies?

    --

    'Ooh I will make you a believer'

    - Sass Jordan
     
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  2. >Anyone else have pollution coping strategies?

    Yeah--pedal slower.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  3. Jbenkert111

    Jbenkert111 Guest

    >>Anyone else have pollution coping strategies?
    >
    >Yeah--pedal slower.
    >

    or better yet, quit worrying about it and enjoy yourself, no use adding stress to your life also.
     
  4. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Barry Gaudet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > ...pollution?
    >
    >
    > We went throught our first smog advisory earlier this week.
    >
    > *sigh*
    >
    > I avoided cycling except for commuting and tried to limit activity to very early morning.
    >
    > Anyone else have pollution coping strategies?

    Just monitor your body. If you are hot, stop and drink some water. Pour some over your head. If your
    heart rate is too fast, rest.

    To be honest, I am very suspicious abou the ozone alerts. The major thing seems to be temperature.
    Supposedly they relate to pollutants being trapped near the ground, but with what seemed to be a
    15-20 mile headwind last week during an ozone alert day, there didn't seem to be much possibility of
    pollutants being trapped.

    I did a search to see what the standardized conditions for ozone alerts are (not the critical
    values, but the test methodology), but ran out of desire before I found them.
     
  5. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Barry Gaudet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > ...pollution?
    > >
    > >
    > > We went throught our first smog advisory earlier this week.
    > >
    > > *sigh*
    > >
    > > I avoided cycling except for commuting and tried to limit activity to very early morning.
    > >
    > > Anyone else have pollution coping strategies?
    >
    > Just monitor your body. If you are hot, stop and drink some water. Pour some over your head. If
    > your heart rate is too fast, rest.
    >
    > To be honest, I am very suspicious abou the ozone alerts. The major thing seems to be temperature.
    > Supposedly they relate to pollutants being trapped near the ground, but with what seemed to be a
    > 15-20 mile headwind last week during an ozone alert day, there didn't seem to be much possibility
    > of pollutants being trapped.
    >
    > I did a search to see what the standardized conditions for ozone alerts are (not the critical
    > values, but the test methodology), but ran out of desire before I found them.

    I don't know much about the details, but I believe the primary conditions for the development of
    ground-level ozone is heat, humidity and sunshine. I don't think the wind plays much of a factor.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  6. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message

    Mike Kruger wrote:
    > > I did a search to see what the standardized conditions for ozone alerts
    are
    > > (not the critical values, but the test methodology), but ran out of
    desire
    > > before I found them.
    >
    > I don't know much about the details, but I believe the primary conditions for the development of
    > ground-level ozone is heat, humidity and sunshine. I don't think the wind plays much of a factor.

    Here's a link to the revised ozone standard: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/oarpg/naaqsfin/o3fact.html

    Heat, humidity, sunshine and wind all play a factor. It is basically a reaction between volatile
    organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides in the presence of heat and sunshine. If it is windy,
    then the precursor compounds get blown away. It is also interesting to note that many trees are
    responsible for emitting VOCs (which are normally attributed to auto exhaust, insectisides,
    cleaners, etc.), so heavily wooded areas tend to have high concentrations of VOCs.

    What I find crazy is that while one organization is screaming about the negative effects of ozone on
    our health, the people making these "ionic" air filters have machines that sit in your home and
    generate ozone to "clean the air." Check it out: http://www.nutriteam.com/cleanair.htm

    Ozone Bad! No, Ozone, when classified as "activated oxygen", Good!

    -Buck
     
  7. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o
    r p . c o m> says...
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > Mike Kruger wrote:
    > > > I did a search to see what the standardized conditions for ozone alerts
    > are
    > > > (not the critical values, but the test methodology), but ran out of
    > desire
    > > > before I found them.
    > >
    > > I don't know much about the details, but I believe the primary conditions for the development of
    > > ground-level ozone is heat, humidity and sunshine. I don't think the wind plays much of a
    > > factor.
    >
    > Here's a link to the revised ozone standard: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/oarpg/naaqsfin/o3fact.html
    >
    > Heat, humidity, sunshine and wind all play a factor. It is basically a reaction between volatile
    > organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides in the presence of heat and sunshine. If it is windy,
    > then the precursor compounds get blown away. It is also interesting to note that many trees are
    > responsible for emitting VOCs (which are normally attributed to auto exhaust, insectisides,
    > cleaners, etc.), so heavily wooded areas tend to have high concentrations of VOCs.

    Of course, the wind doesn't actually get rid of them; it just moves them to somewhere else, where
    people end up with high ozone levels even without the VOC's and NOx being emitted there. New England
    ends up with a lot of New York's pollution levels because of the prevailing winds in the summer.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  8. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message Buck wrote:
    > > Heat, humidity, sunshine and wind all play a factor. It is basically a reaction between volatile
    > > organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides
    in
    > > the presence of heat and sunshine. If it is windy, then the precursor compounds get blown away.
    > > It is also interesting to note that many trees
    are
    > > responsible for emitting VOCs (which are normally attributed to auto exhaust, insectisides,
    > > cleaners, etc.), so heavily wooded areas tend to
    have
    > > high concentrations of VOCs.
    >
    > Of course, the wind doesn't actually get rid of them; it just moves them to somewhere else,
    > where people end up with high ozone levels even without the VOC's and NOx being emitted there.
    > New England ends up with a lot of New York's pollution levels because of the prevailing winds in
    > the summer.

    You are correct, all of the elements move to a different and have the same negative effects there.
    Although there is some mixing with upper-level air when the wind is blowing, so the effects aren't
    as strong downwind. Ozone itself is highly reactive and doesn't last long in the lower atmosphere
    where there are lots of things for it to react with.

    Another interesting effect of cities, smog and heat are urban heat islands. Literally an area of
    higher atmospheric temperatures over the city. The urban heat island around Atlanta has been shown
    to have an effect on the weather south of town. The hot moist air rises over the city, gets cooled
    down to form clouds, the prevailing winds push the clouds south, then it rains. So if you live south
    of Atlanta, your need for afternoon raingear is not just your imagination.

    -Buck
     
  9. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o
    r p . c o m> says...
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message Buck wrote:
    > > > Heat, humidity, sunshine and wind all play a factor. It is basically a reaction between
    > > > volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides
    > in
    > > > the presence of heat and sunshine. If it is windy, then the precursor compounds get blown
    > > > away. It is also interesting to note that many trees
    > are
    > > > responsible for emitting VOCs (which are normally attributed to auto exhaust, insectisides,
    > > > cleaners, etc.), so heavily wooded areas tend to
    > have
    > > > high concentrations of VOCs.
    > >
    > > Of course, the wind doesn't actually get rid of them; it just moves them to somewhere else,
    > > where people end up with high ozone levels even without the VOC's and NOx being emitted there.
    > > New England ends up with a lot of New York's pollution levels because of the prevailing winds in
    > > the summer.
    >
    > You are correct, all of the elements move to a different and have the same negative effects there.
    > Although there is some mixing with upper-level air when the wind is blowing, so the effects aren't
    > as strong downwind. Ozone itself is highly reactive and doesn't last long in the lower atmosphere
    > where there are lots of things for it to react with.

    Like my lungs <GG>.

    > Another interesting effect of cities, smog and heat are urban heat islands. Literally an area of
    > higher atmospheric temperatures over the city. The urban heat island around Atlanta has been shown
    > to have an effect on the weather south of town. The hot moist air rises over the city, gets cooled
    > down to form clouds, the prevailing winds push the clouds south, then it rains. So if you live
    > south of Atlanta, your need for afternoon raingear is not just your imagination.

    I've read about this, and it's pretty interesting to watch on radar animations.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  10. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    Barry Gaudet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone else have pollution coping strategies?

    I make sure I have my albuterol inhaler with me.

    RFM
    --
    To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha. 4=a 0=o 3=e +=t
     
  11. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote:

    > It is also interesting to note that many trees are responsible for emitting VOCs (which are
    > normally attributed to auto exhaust, insectisides, cleaners, etc.), so heavily wooded areas tend
    > to have high concentrations of VOCs.

    Hold it there; you're starting to sound like James Watt of the Reagan regime.

    If you think that the hydrocarbons produced by plants and those produced by automobiles are
    equivalent in their tendency to poison the air, you are woefully mistaken. Forests may have plenty
    of plant aromas, but those don't cause smog no matter the conditions.

    It's like comparing the exhalation of your xmas tree with that of your lawnmower, or equating
    juniper berry essence (that flavors your gin) with gasoline. Bottoms up!

    Chalo Colina
     
  12. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote:
    >
    > > It is also interesting to note that many trees are responsible for emitting VOCs (which are
    > > normally attributed to auto exhaust, insectisides, cleaners, etc.), so heavily wooded areas tend
    > > to have high concentrations of VOCs.
    >
    > Hold it there; you're starting to sound like James Watt of the Reagan regime.
    >
    > If you think that the hydrocarbons produced by plants and those produced by automobiles are
    > equivalent in their tendency to poison the air, you are woefully mistaken. Forests may have plenty
    > of plant aromas, but those don't cause smog no matter the conditions.
    >
    > It's like comparing the exhalation of your xmas tree with that of your lawnmower, or equating
    > juniper berry essence (that flavors your gin) with gasoline. Bottoms up!

    Actually, he's correct to a certain extent. IIRC, oak trees, in particular, release significant
    quantities of formaldehyde. In most areas, that source is small compared to the industrial and
    automotive contributions, but is certainly not negligible, and in some areas (with few industries or
    major roads) it is the major source.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  13. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Mike Kruger wrote:
    > > > I did a search to see what the standardized conditions for ozone
    alerts
    > are
    > > > (not the critical values, but the test methodology), but ran out of
    > desire
    > > > before I found them.
    > >
    > > I don't know much about the details, but I believe the primary
    conditions
    > > for the development of ground-level ozone is heat, humidity and
    sunshine.
    > > I don't think the wind plays much of a factor.
    >
    > Here's a link to the revised ozone standard: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/oarpg/naaqsfin/o3fact.html
    >
    Thanks. After reviewing this site, I think I'm a victim. The last couple of days of my tour last
    month were ozone alert days. According to the site, "Repeated exposure to ozone can make people more
    susceptible to respiratory infection and lung inflammation..."

    A couple of days after I returned, I started getting very tired, and having a fever in the
    afternoon and evening. After 4 days of this (and with a 103F fever the previous evening), I went
    to the doctor, who said I had a lung infection and put me on antibiotics, which definitely have me
    on the mend.

    These are pretty much the same symptoms, and the same antibiotic cure, I had in August, 2001, after
    I finished another tour that involved two centuries during an ozone alert.

    It makes sense, of course. The ozone irritates the lungs, and makes it easier for infections to
    take hold.

    This isn't medical-journal quality evidence, but probably strong enough evidence for me to pay more
    attention to very long rides during ozone alerts. Without reading this thread, I probably would have
    remained a skeptic.
     
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