What to DO and NOT to do when installing an italian thread BB?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by puma, Jan 28, 2004.

  1. puma

    puma New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2003
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello. I'm pretty confident in being able to install a bottom bracket; I'll have the instruction manual, have read some online resources, and have installed a few BBs on a few of my BMXs in earlier years. But the frame is a BB virgin and also expensive, so I just don't want to take any chances. It will be an Ultegra italian thread in an aluminum Italian frame. I've got the Shimano BB tool and some anti-seize for the BB, will I need anything else? What should I make sure to do, or not do when installing (other than not stripping the threads by turning the BB in the wrong way). What's the best technique (I've heard some instruction along the lines of screwing in one side lightly, then the other side, and finally finshing off with the original side). If so, which side first. I've also heard that italian thread BB have a way of coming undone? Any and all feedback appreciated. Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Install the non drive side cup part way first,as it will help align the cartridge. both sides are normal right hand threads. Italian BB tend to be 'self loosening' on the drive side,so it needs to be extra tight. Ideally,the frame should be prepped by chasing and facing the BB if not done at the factory. Facing is not as critical with cartridge BB,but the threads should be clean, and it is helpful if the face of the shell is at least free of paint.
     
  3. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    2,763
    Likes Received:
    0
    Begin by preparing the threads of the bottom bracket. Steel bottom bracket frame shells with aluminum or steel lockrings, use a thread locking compound such as Loctite® #242. (Note: the #242 and comparable thread lockers are considered "service removeable". This means that the parts are removeable with normal tools and without taking extreme measures.) Place a bead of the compound around the first three threads on both lockrings. Thread locking compounds are available from some bicycle stores, automotive parts store and better hardware stores. (If no thread locking compound is available, grease threads heavily or apply anti-seize.) For more on thread preparation see Threaded Fastener Concepts.

    If the bottom bracket frame shell is aluminum or titanium, use anti-seize compound. Even if lockrings are steel, use anti-seize. Anti-seize is available at some bicycle stores, hardware stores, or automotive parts stores. Grease can be used in place of anti-seize, but anti-seize is more durable and provides better lubrication during tightening. Apply this only to the threads.

    Plastic lockrings or cups need only grease on the threads. Do not use thread lockers on plastic as the chemical may cause the plastic to become brittle.

    It can sometimes happen a bottom bracket can creak where the lockring or cups meet the bearing body. To prevent this, apply a thread locking compound such as Loctite #242 to the inside area of removable ring, where it meets the body. This will help prevent any creaking in the future. With plastic rings, do not apply any thread locking compound.

    From Park Tool site at URL:
    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcartdg.shtml
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    5,133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Grease or grease and teflon tape has worked on every BB application I have ever used,with the exception of Ti frames where Ti prep was used.
     
Loading...
Loading...