What to do: LBS does not have demo

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by NuTT98, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. NuTT98

    NuTT98 New Member

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    I'm in the midst of getting an Allez Elite 18 2005. I asked the LBS if they have one I can ride, they said "no demo". I asked if there's something similar I can ride... they said "no demo". I'm in Toronto BTW, so if anyone has the slightest idea where I could ride one, let me know.

    So it seems my only hope of ever getting one is to take my chances.

    However, there's still an issue of size. I'm 5'11", and they suggested a 56cm.

    Now I know there's a matter of preference and the like, but what would generally be the right size for a fella my height and a compact frame?
     
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  2. insung

    insung New Member

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    When you say "demo" do you mean taking the bike that you're looking at for a quick spin? or do you mean a bike that you can actually take home and borrow for a couple days? Because almost every bike shop should let you take the bike that you're interested in out for a quick spin. Would you buy a car without test driving it?

    Most bike shops have "demo" bikes that you can borrow for a day or two, but you can't always get the model and size you want, and that's understandable. But if this shop doesn't let you test ride a bike before buying it, I'd find another shop by looking in the yellow pages and calling around.
     
  3. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    Absolutely agreed. It's a rare shop indeed that won't let you even take a bike for a brief spin. Unless their prices are phenomenally low, I'd drive a long ways to find a different place to drop money. Heck, even if the prices are rock-bottom, I'd worry about the sort of service a shop like that could provide in the longrun if you needed support.
     
  4. NuTT98

    NuTT98 New Member

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    I was referring to simply taking the bike for a stroll around the parking lot, or even the shop itself.:)

    Thought I didn't know what the other dude thought I meant... but I called again, another fella picked up and he said it could be done.

    Apparently there's only a 56 in the shop... so would one say something larger would be better for my height?
     
  5. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    Regarding sizing, it's hard to say. This is a complicated (and sometimes heated subject) that can only be absolutely solved in one way: being sized, bike in hand. Just keep in mind that different manufacturers report dimmensions in different ways; you could be a 57 on one make and a 60 on another.

    Best to not cut corners when it comes to sizing, especially if you're not terribly experienced in buying bikes.

    On that note, don't, under any circumstances, let the shop give you a hard time about test riding and careful fitting. It's standard procedure, and for good reason. You need to have an excellent understanding of how a particular selection works for you.

    Good luck!
     
  6. meehs

    meehs New Member

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    Yes to what Lokstah said regarding sizing. Also, a good shop wouldn't recommend a size based on you just telling them your height over the phone. That's not enough to go on when sizing a bike, not even close. And the fact that they recommended a 56cm and that happens to be the one bike that they have in the shop is a little suspicious. It could very well be your correct size but they wouldn't know that simply by you telling them that you're 5'11".

    Buying the wrong size is one of the biggest mistakes people make when buying a new bike. And unfortunately there are some shops that are more interested in selling you what they have on-hand than they are in selling you a bike that actually fits. Going to the shop with the basic knowledge of how a bike should fit and your approximate size is a really good idea. I've witnessed bike shop sales people telling someone who's riding a bike that's way too big or small that it fits them perfectly. I don't know if they really don't know any better (in which case they shouldn't be working there) or if they're just trying to sell what they have.

    I once test rode a MTB at a local shop and when I was out on the road I stopped and adjusted the saddle to the correct height for me. When I got back the shop employee (who was a young kid) said "No, that's not where the saddle should be set." Then he loosened the seatpost QR closed one eye and stuck his tongue out (as though he were making a really precise adjustment) and said "it should be set right...... here!" I said "uh huh" and left the shop.

    Find a good shop that will take the time to fit you properly. There are also fit calculators online that will give you a good idea of what size bike you need. One is located here:

    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO

    Good luck!
     
  7. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    A 56cm is probably the right size for at least 50% of guys your height, even given the variations in people and frame measuring methods. But you should definitely get a real fit session if you don't know for sure.
     
  8. eortiz

    eortiz New Member

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    STOP!!! Do not get a 56!!!! Well.... unless it is right for you ;) I got a 56 cm c-c st thinking it was right for me. Rode the bike for 5 yrs and finally decided to get a pro. fit done. Turns out I need a 58 c-c st and 58 c-c tt. The guy who did the fit adjusted everything on my bike but could not make it work for me. He placed an adjustable stem and like I said, I needed at least a 58 cm c-c tt which in turn I'll need a longer st than what I have. A bike that fits will make your whole body relax when riding the bike. Like they said, riding a bike should be fun and not painful. Good luck
     
  9. jitteringjr

    jitteringjr New Member

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    The competitive cyclist link above is good also try www.wrenchscience.com for another fit calculator.

    I would not personally buy a bike from a store that will not let me test ride one.
     
  10. NuTT98

    NuTT98 New Member

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    They did seem kinda fishy. I found another place that has them 20 dollars cheaper (always something:D ), seems nice, and will let me ride around.

    Judging by the calculator, I'm a 56 Eddy Fit. Which seems about right, but I'll certainly make sure. Thx.
     
  11. neil0502

    neil0502 New Member

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    (It doesn't sound as though you are, but . . . ) remember not to get too hung up on the numbers. In other words, there are several sites (two have already been presented to you) that describe how a bike should fit you. Work with those. If--for some inexplicable reason--you wound up in a 60cm frame -- call it odd geometry, or whatever -- but the fit parameters really worked, resulting in a very comfortable position for the kind of riding you intend to do . . . then you're good!

    Here are a couple more sources for fit info for you:

    CLICK ME
    ..CLICK ME 2
    ....CLICK ME 3
    ......CLICK ME 4
     
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