What to look for in a frame ?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Smith, Sep 10, 2003.

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  1. Simon Smith

    Simon Smith Guest

    After looking around at road bikes, I decided the best bet was to build one up using a company like
    Deeside or Ribble (I know) or just buying the components myself and building it up over the winter.

    As I'm new to cycling I'm a bit confused about the masses of frame options around but have been told
    to get carbon forks and a carbon seat stay if I can afford it because the ride on aluminium is too
    unpleasant otherwise. I haven't really considered steel as it tends to be more expensive and heavier
    and Carbon and Ti are way too expensive.

    Concerning the aluminium alloy is there any difference in quality between 7003, 7005 and SC61.10A
    (scandium) ? Am I right in thinking that the only difference is the weight ?

    Has anyone tried any of the ribble or deeside frames with carbon seat stays ?

    Thanks

    Simon
     
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  2. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Simon Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > After looking around at road bikes, I decided the best bet was to build one up using a company
    > like Deeside or Ribble (I know) or just buying the components myself and building it up over
    > the winter.

    snip

    standard Question 1.

    What do you want the bike for? OK -- you say road but what type of cycling? Racing? TT? Pootling
    down to the shops?

    T
     
  3. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Simon Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > After looking around at road bikes, I decided the best bet was to build one up using a company
    > like Deeside or Ribble (I know) or just buying the components myself and building it up over
    > the winter.
    >
    > As I'm new to cycling I'm a bit confused about the masses of frame options around but have been
    > told to get carbon forks and a carbon seat stay if I can afford it because the ride on aluminium
    > is too unpleasant otherwise. I haven't really considered steel as it tends to be more expensive
    > and heavier and Carbon and Ti are way too expensive.
    >
    > Concerning the aluminium alloy is there any difference in quality between 7003, 7005 and SC61.10A
    > (scandium) ? Am I right in thinking that the only difference is the weight ?
    >
    > Has anyone tried any of the ribble or deeside frames with carbon seat stays ?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Simon

    Don' be too bothered about the carbon chain and seat stay thing. I have an aluminium framed
    Colnago Dream and it is no less comfortable than my steel framed LeMond ! Carbon seat stays
    have been adopted by Colnago at a huge price premium. And this is only after every one else had
    done it. Go for the lightest of the frames on your list and enjoy the benifits of a light and
    stiff frame.

    Graham
     
  4. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Graham wrote:

    > "Simon Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > After looking around at road bikes, I decided the best bet was to build one up using a company
    > > like Deeside or Ribble (I know) or just buying the components myself and building it up over the
    > > winter.
    > >
    > > As I'm new to cycling I'm a bit confused about the masses of frame options

    <snip>

    > Don' be too bothered about the carbon chain and seat stay thing. I have an aluminium framed
    > Colnago Dream and it is no less comfortable than my steel framed LeMond ! Carbon seat stays have
    > been adopted by Colnago at a huge price premium. And this is only after every one else had done
    > it. Go for the lightest of the frames on your list and enjoy the benifits of a light and stiff
    > frame.

    So long as its steel <ducks>

    John B
     
  5. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

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    You asked what to look for in a frame, I have three steel bikes, not simply steel, Reynolds 531 and Columbus SLX. The oldest is 17 years old and has been straighten once by a frame builder, had the rear drop outs widened (cold set) to take six speed block. This would be impossible with al or fibre. The other 531 bike is 14 years old and has been completely refurbished, I had cable tunnels brazed on at that time. All of my bikes are comfy rides for 100+ miles. I have no experience of the more modern materials so I would look for steel - but thats just me
     
  6. rider

    rider New Member

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    By all means gor for an all aluminium frame but make sure you also get a suspension seat post unless your butt is made of stone.
    If you thinking of riding lond distances and want a frame that will last, then Ti is unbeatable. A Ti frame doesn't have to be that expensive e.g. Omega, Airborne, Habanero.
     
  7. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "MSeries" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Simon Smith wrote:
    > > I haven't really considered steel as it tends to be more expensive and heavier
    >
    >
    >
    > You asked what to look for in a frame, I have three steel bikes, not simply steel, Reynolds 531
    > and Columbus SLX. The oldest is 17 years old and has been straighten once by a frame builder, had
    > the rear drop outs widened (cold set) to take six speed block. This would be impossible with al or
    > fibre. The other 531 bike is 14 years old and has been completely refurbished, I had cable tunnels
    > brazed on at that time. All of my bikes are comfy rides for 100+ miles. I have no experience of
    > the more modern materials so I would look for steel - but thats just me
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com

    He would not need all that work done as it would be a brand new frame with the capacity to take a
    9 or 10 speed cassette. And by the time any really new technology was out then get a new frame.

    Graham
     
  8. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    [email protected] (Simon Smith) writes:

    > After looking around at road bikes, I decided the best bet was to build one up using a company
    > like Deeside or Ribble (I know) or just buying the components myself and building it up over
    > the winter.
    >
    > As I'm new to cycling I'm a bit confused about the masses of frame options around but have been
    > told to get carbon forks and a carbon seat stay if I can afford it because the ride on aluminium
    > is too unpleasant otherwise. I haven't really considered steel as it tends to be more expensive
    > and heavier and Carbon and Ti are way too expensive.

    A lot of people with a lot of experience say it really doesn't make any difference. Certainly in my
    opinion it doesn't make nearly as much difference as the pressure in the tyres, the build of the
    wheels, and the angles.

    There's a current thread on <URL:news:rec.bicycles.tech> on exactly this topic which might make
    educative reading. Also I was reading today an interesting web-page on frame stiffness
    <URL:http://technology.open.ac.uk/materials/bikeframes/bikeframe.html> which shows that the
    difference in stiffness road bike frames doesn't vary nearly as much as you'd expect, but of
    those tested one titanium frame was the _least_ stiff over all while the other titanium frame was
    the _most_!

    Of course stiffness is not the same as compliancy; but it's related. So my guess is

    (i) Materials, at least in frames from well known makers, won't make enough difference to
    be noticed

    (ii) 'Hourglass', or S shaped, seat and chain stays might make a bit of difference

    (iii) Tyres and wheels will make more difference.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    'Victories are not solutions.' ;; John Hume, Northern Irish politician, on Radio Scotland
    1/2/95 ;; Nobel Peace Prize laureate 1998; few have deserved it so much
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    > (iii) Tyres and wheels will make more difference.

    Indeed. Much more, I would think. Saddle as well!

    ~PB
     
  10. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "rider" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Simon Smith wrote:
    > > After looking around at road bikes, I decided the best bet was to
    build
    > > one up using a company like Deeside or Ribble (I know) or just buying the components myself
    > > and building it up over the winter. As I'm new to cycling I'm a bit confused about the masses
    > > of frame options around but have been told to get carbon forks and a carbon
    seat
    > > stay if I can afford it because the ride on aluminium is too
    unpleasant
    > > otherwise. I haven't really considered steel as it tends to be more expensive and heavier and
    > > Carbon and Ti are way too expensive. Concerning the aluminium alloy is there any difference in
    > > quality between 7003, 7005 and SC61.10A (scandium) ? Am I right in thinking
    that
    > > the only difference is the weight ? Has anyone tried any of the ribble or deeside frames with
    > > carbon seat stays ? Thanks Simon
    >
    >
    >
    > By all means gor for an all aluminium frame but make sure you also get a suspension seat post
    > unless your butt is made of stone. If you thinking of riding lond distances and want a frame that
    > will last, then Ti is unbeatable. A Ti frame doesn't have to be that expensive e.g. Omega,
    > Airborne, Habanero.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com

    Having done the same century ride for the last four years, with the first 3 on a steel bike and
    this year on an aluminium bike I can tell you there is no difference in "comfort" between the two
    bikes. I can say however that the aluminium framed bike feels far more responsive and accelerates
    much better.

    Graham
     
  11. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    rider <[email protected]> wrote:

    : By all means gor for an all aluminium frame but make sure you also get a suspension seat post
    : unless your butt is made of stone.

    This just isn't true in my experience. I used to have a very cheap un-butted Al frame. That was
    indeed very, very harsh to ride.

    I also have a nice easton elite butted frame which rides very nicely indeed.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Techolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  12. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

    Joined:
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    Perhaps this is so on the spacing point. I would have been most upset if I my only option to 'fix' the mis alignment of my handmade frame was to scrap it and get a new one. This particular bike has carried me across a continent, it has sentimental value and will not be retired until it is beyond repair. Other replies also echo a point which I was thinking of and it is this: Cheap aluminium frames are not better than decent steel ones, the build quality is also important, not just the material.
     
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