What to put in brine?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mike, Nov 23, 2005.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    I was just talking to a friend of mine about his turkey preparation and
    he said his wife was soaking their turkey in a brine. I think I might
    try this in an attempt to make the dead bird a little less dry. How
    should I go about this? Some water and salt and the victim in a
    garbage bag for a few hours (or even overnight)?

    Thanks for any input...

    Mike
     
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  2. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I was just talking to a friend of mine about his turkey preparation and
    > he said his wife was soaking their turkey in a brine. I think I might
    > try this in an attempt to make the dead bird a little less dry. How
    > should I go about this? Some water and salt and the victim in a
    > garbage bag for a few hours (or even overnight)?
    >
    > Thanks for any input...
    >
    > Mike


    If you get a chance in your area be sure to watch if it comes up, Alton
    Brown's show on Moist Turkey, an hour show addresses this -- however,
    time's a wastin' for this year's bird.
    Dee Dee
    >
     
  3. levelwave

    levelwave Guest

    The Basics of Brining

    I picked up this information from the November/December 2001 issue of
    Cook's Illustrated.
    They and others have pushed for brining to bring out flavors and keep
    juiciness for years.
    But this is the best complete description in one place. If you can get
    this issue,
    go for it.

    I won't go into the details of why this works (that is in the article).
    But we have
    used brining for several years now and can tell you it is well worth
    it. A pork roast
    that has first been brined is fabulous.

    First some comments on salt. All salt is not equal. How much saltiness
    there is per
    cup of salt is what's important. They used common table salt as their
    base saltiness.
    It weighs about 10 ounces per cup. Diamond Crystal kosher salt weighs
    about 5 ounces
    per cup, making it half as strong as table salt. So you need twice as
    much. Whatever
    salt you use, if not one of these, simply weigh one cup. Say it weighs
    8 ounces. Then
    you should use 10/8 times 1/4 cup of it per quart of water.

    Another important point is to make sure the salt you use is NOT
    iodized. Also,
    kosher salt will give a cleaner flavor because it doesn't contain
    iodine nor
    anti-caking agents. So the recommended salt is kosher salt.
    Brine Ingredients per Quart of Water


    Type of Brine Salt Sugar
    Basic

    * 1/2 C Diamond Crystal kosher
    * 1/4 C +2 T Morton Kosher
    * 1/4 C table

    1/2 C
    High-Heat Roasting, Grilling or Broiling

    * 1/4 C Diamond Crystal kosher
    * 3 T Morton Kosher
    * 2 T table

    2 T
    Notes

    1. Amount of Brine: Use 1 quart per pound of food not to exceed 2
    gallons
    2. Time: 1 hour per pound, but not less than 30 minutes nor more
    than 8 hours
    3. When brining multiple items (e.g. porkchops), time based on
    weight of single item
    4. Best candidates for brining:
    * Pork (loin, tenderloin, chops, fresh ham)
    * Seafood: salmon (when grill roasting or smoking), shrimp
    * Chicken (whole, parts, butterflied), cornish hen (whole,
    butterflied)
    * Turkey (whole, breast, parts, butterflied)
    5. When brining fowl, if you want crispy skins, you need to air dry,
    uncovered,
    in the refrigerator after brining. Air dry overnight or, for
    parts, several hours.

    Process
    Mix cold water, salt and sugar in brining vessel and stir to disolve
    salt and sugar.
    Immerse food in brine, seal or close container and refrigerate or add
    ice packs. Note
    that you could use warm water to disolve the salt and sugar more easily
    but you would
    then need to cool the brine before adding the food.
     
  4. levelwave

    levelwave Guest

    Oops... sorry about the formatting. Just copy and paste into a text
    editor and it should be easier to read.

    ~john
     
  5. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote

    > should I go about this? Some water and salt and the victim in a
    > garbage bag for a few hours (or even overnight)?


    Use a turkey roasting bag if it has the zip top, or put it
    into a clean cooler. You don't want to use a garbage bag.
    Make sure you keep it chilled, either in the refrigerator
    or in the cooler with ice.

    nancy
     
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