What tools do I need to work on my bike...?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Holden, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. Holden

    Holden Guest

    I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano components.
    I have threadless headsets.
    I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to and
    including removing chain for cleaning and making any other adjustments
    in the drivetrain.
    Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?

    Thanks,
    H
     
    Tags:


  2. JIm Flom

    JIm Flom Guest

    "Holden" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano components.
    > I have threadless headsets.
    > I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    > you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to and
    > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other adjustments
    > in the drivetrain.
    > Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?


    Please try rec.bicycles.tech for all your techie needs.
     
  3. "Holden" wrote:
    >I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano components.
    > I have threadless headsets.
    > I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    > you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to and
    > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other adjustments
    > in the drivetrain.
    > Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?


    Well, starting with the simplest:

    Set of allen keys (4, 5, 6, 7, 8 mm)
    Adjustable wrench
    Housing and cable cutters
    Pedal wrench
    Chain tool (the Park CT-3 is good)
    Cassette removal tool
    Chain whip
    BB tool for your particular BB
    Cone wrenches for your hubs
    Spoke wrench (I like the "spokey")
    Wheel truing stand and dishing tool

    Art Harris
     
  4. Tom

    Tom Guest

    Arthur Harris wrote:
    > "Holden" wrote:
    > >I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > > stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano

    components.
    > > I have threadless headsets.
    > > I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > > Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks

    say
    > > you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to

    and
    > > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other

    adjustments
    > > in the drivetrain.
    > > Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?

    >
    > Well, starting with the simplest:
    >
    > Set of allen keys (4, 5, 6, 7, 8 mm)
    > Adjustable wrench
    > Housing and cable cutters
    > Pedal wrench
    > Chain tool (the Park CT-3 is good)
    > Cassette removal tool
    > Chain whip
    > BB tool for your particular BB
    > Cone wrenches for your hubs
    > Spoke wrench (I like the "spokey")
    > Wheel truing stand and dishing tool
    >
    > Art Harris


    Also, Park Tool, and Pedros and some others make nice little sets of
    tools with toolboxes included that have pretty much everything that you
    might need and or want to do most stuff to your bike at home. Check
    them out if you get a chance, here are some links:

    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/toollists.shtml
    http://www.parktool.com/tool_indexes/catindex_kit.shtml

    Tom
     
  5. Holden

    Holden Guest

    thank you
     
  6. Holden wrote:
    > I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano

    components.
    > I have threadless headsets.
    > I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    > you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to

    and
    > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other

    adjustments
    > in the drivetrain.
    > Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?




    The best thing to get is a cnc machine. A HaasVF1 should do most stuff
    you'd need to make bike parts and tools.

    http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=239&tstr=VMC
    you're welcome,

    K. Gringioni.
     
  7. tcmedara

    tcmedara Guest

    Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > Holden wrote:
    >> I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    >> stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano
    >> components. I have threadless headsets.
    >> I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    >> Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    >> you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    >> What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to
    >> and including removing chain for cleaning and making any other
    >> adjustments in the drivetrain.
    >> Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?

    >
    >
    >
    > The best thing to get is a cnc machine. A HaasVF1 should do most stuff
    > you'd need to make bike parts and tools.
    >
    > http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=239&tstr=VMC
    > you're welcome,
    >
    > K. Gringioni.


    That's got to be the dumbest thing I've ever seen posted to this NG.
    Everyone knows that *real* cyclists prefer the VF3 as a far superior
    product:

    http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=42&tstr=5Axis

    Sure the VF1 has it's place, but for the truly dedicated cyclist, the VF3 is
    the only logical choice. How you would ever expect to get a decent cone
    wrench, let alone a BB tool from that POS called the VF1 is beyond me.

    ....that's the trouble with usenet, you get all the good adivice you pay for.

    VF1, sheesh.... next thing you know he'll be advocating the 10 micron
    coolant filter as a "must have".

    Some people.

    Tom
     
  8. alan

    alan Guest

    As others have noted, the tool kits from Park or Pedros are clearly adequate
    for a novice mechanic. You'll need some other things - though likely not
    that CNC machine! - so take a look in a local tool supply or even Sears.

    But of more importance is learning HOW to use the tools and developing some
    judgement as to what needs to be done. For that I highly recommend the Park
    website with its repair section, or the Barnett's manual available at
    http://www.oklahomacycling.net, among other sources. If I recall right,
    the manual at Ok Cycling net is complete but an older edition, and you'll
    need to register (I think) in order to download it.

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."


    "Holden" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano components.
    > I have threadless headsets.
    > I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    > you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to and
    > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other adjustments
    > in the drivetrain.
    > Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > H
    >
     
  9. tcmedara wrote:
    >
    > That's got to be the dumbest thing I've ever seen posted to this NG.
    > Everyone knows that *real* cyclists prefer the VF3 as a far superior
    > product:
    >
    > http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=42&tstr=5Axis
    >
    > Sure the VF1 has it's place, but for the truly dedicated cyclist, the

    VF3 is
    > the only logical choice. How you would ever expect to get a decent

    cone
    > wrench, let alone a BB tool from that POS called the VF1 is beyond

    me.


    <snip>


    Dumbass -

    You are correct.

    However, I am no longer a hard-core cyclist, I'm a casual Fred now. So
    the VF-1 works for me, but ya, the other guy should get the VS-3.

    Howard Kveck is the one who's the most hardcore on this group - he's
    got a Mori Seiki.


    K. Gringioni.
     
  10. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <%[email protected]>,
    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    > > Holden wrote:
    > >> I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > >> stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano
    > >> components. I have threadless headsets.
    > >> I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > >> Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    > >> you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > >> What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to
    > >> and including removing chain for cleaning and making any other
    > >> adjustments in the drivetrain.
    > >> Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > The best thing to get is a cnc machine. A HaasVF1 should do most stuff
    > > you'd need to make bike parts and tools.
    > >
    > > http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=239&tstr=VMC
    > > you're welcome,
    > >
    > > K. Gringioni.

    >
    > That's got to be the dumbest thing I've ever seen posted to this NG.
    > Everyone knows that *real* cyclists prefer the VF3 as a far superior
    > product:
    >
    > http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=42&tstr=5Axis
    >
    > Sure the VF1 has it's place, but for the truly dedicated cyclist, the VF3 is
    > the only logical choice. How you would ever expect to get a decent cone
    > wrench, let alone a BB tool from that POS called the VF1 is beyond me.
    >
    > ...that's the trouble with usenet, you get all the good adivice you pay for.
    >
    > VF1, sheesh.... next thing you know he'll be advocating the 10 micron
    > coolant filter as a "must have".
    >
    > Some people.
    >
    > Tom



    Haas? Heh, snicker... Well, at least nobody mentioned Fadal. Oh well, I
    better get back to running the Mori Seikis.

    Machine shop snobbery - I love it...

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Butter is love.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  11. Howard Kveck wrote:

    >
    > Haas? Heh, snicker... Well, at least nobody mentioned Fadal. Oh

    well, I
    > better get back to running the Mori Seikis.
    >
    > Machine shop snobbery - I love it...




    Dumbass -

    You'd laugh at my machine. Not only is it pre-1996, meaning that it has
    the plastic coolant/chip enclosure, but they either crashed it so hard
    or ran a forklift into it that the enclosure was completely broken off.

    It pretty much works though. I'm almost done with making a new
    enclosure (naturally out of stainless steel).
    K. Gringioni.
    bigtime Fred
     
  12. tcmedara

    tcmedara Guest

    Little Meow wrote:
    > tcmedara wrote:
    >
    >> Kurgan Gringioni wrote:
    >>> Holden wrote:
    >>>> I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice
    >>>> work stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano
    >>>> components. I have threadless headsets.
    >>>> I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    >>>> Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks
    >>>> say you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    >>>> What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to
    >>>> and including removing chain for cleaning and making any other
    >>>> adjustments in the drivetrain.
    >>>> Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The best thing to get is a cnc machine. A HaasVF1 should do most
    >>> stuff you'd need to make bike parts and tools.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=239&tstr=VMC
    >>> you're welcome,
    >>>
    >>> K. Gringioni.

    >>
    >> That's got to be the dumbest thing I've ever seen posted to this NG.
    >> Everyone knows that *real* cyclists prefer the VF3 as a far superior
    >> product:
    >>
    >> http://www.haascnc.com/products/default_details.asp?id=42&tstr=5Axis
    >>
    >> Sure the VF1 has it's place, but for the truly dedicated cyclist, the
    >> VF3 is the only logical choice. How you would ever expect to get a
    >> decent cone wrench, let alone a BB tool from that POS called the VF1
    >> is beyond me.
    >>
    >> ...that's the trouble with usenet, you get all the good adivice you
    >> pay for.
    >>
    >> VF1, sheesh.... next thing you know he'll be advocating the 10 micron
    >> coolant filter as a "must have".
    >>
    >> Some people.
    >>
    >> Tom
    >>

    >
    > Where can I get some billet aluminum?
    > Mining and forging my own cuts into the time I should
    > be spending on my bike, and the electric bill is cutting
    > into my budget for quality seasonal bike fashions and
    > accessories. It also makes my nails dirty.


    A perfect example of what's wrong in the world today, and why cycling has
    lost some of its romance and allure. All these wannabes looking for the
    easy way out. If you aren't willing to go find your own source of high
    quality bauxite, why the hell did you ever think you wanted to ride a
    bicycle?

    I'm guessing the next big thing is some Fred asking about "ready to order"
    tires. What's so damn hard about tapping your own rubber trees I must ask?

    Tom
     
  13. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "tcmedara" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A perfect example of what's wrong in the world today, and why cycling has
    > lost some of its romance and allure. All these wannabes looking for the
    > easy way out. If you aren't willing to go find your own source of high
    > quality bauxite, why the hell did you ever think you wanted to ride a
    > bicycle?
    >
    > I'm guessing the next big thing is some Fred asking about "ready to order"
    > tires. What's so damn hard about tapping your own rubber trees I must ask?
    >
    > Tom


    Some people just expect everything to be handed to 'em. No backbone, I
    tells ya!

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Butter is love.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  14. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Howard Kveck wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Haas? Heh, snicker... Well, at least nobody mentioned Fadal. Oh

    > well, I
    > > better get back to running the Mori Seikis.
    > >
    > > Machine shop snobbery - I love it...

    >
    >
    >
    > Dumbass -
    >
    > You'd laugh at my machine. Not only is it pre-1996, meaning that it has
    > the plastic coolant/chip enclosure, but they either crashed it so hard
    > or ran a forklift into it that the enclosure was completely broken off.
    >
    > It pretty much works though. I'm almost done with making a new
    > enclosure (naturally out of stainless steel).
    > K. Gringioni.
    > bigtime Fred


    Well, at least it *had* an enclosure. I've had to run machines that
    barely had a trough around the table to catch the coolant. Stuff with tape
    reader controls that you couldn't edit on and five gallon (!!!!) coolant
    reservoirs. Thankfully, times have changed.

    Full enclosures are certainly your friend.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Butter is love.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  15. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

  16. On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 18:30:55 -0500, "tcmedara"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I'm guessing the next big thing is some Fred asking about "ready to order"
    >tires. What's so damn hard about tapping your own rubber trees I must ask?


    Finding one in the mood.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  17. On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 21:58:39 GMT, "alan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >As others have noted, the tool kits from Park or Pedros are clearly adequate
    >for a novice mechanic. You'll need some other things - though likely not
    >that CNC machine! - so take a look in a local tool supply or even Sears.


    At least you no longer need the 18 inch long open face wrench to
    torque a freewheel off. And boots when you stand on the sucker to
    break the freewheel free, when neither side of the rubber/plastic
    hammer would work. Limped for a week once and the dog wouldn't go near
    a bike wheel for a month. Could be worse - if the wrench hadn't hit me
    and the dog, I thiink it would have gotten the TV set.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  18. > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to
    and
    > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other

    adjustments
    > in the drivetrain.
    > Also, should I stick w/ Park tools?? any other brands OK?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > H


    The first thing you need is a copy of Zinn and the Art of Road/Mountain
    Bike Maintenance. That way you can see exactly what tools you need for
    what jobs. Zinn also has basic/advanced/complete tool lists if you just
    want somebody to tell you what to buy.

    One thing you will see is that many of the tools that come in a tool
    set are for building bikes and replacing components and will be of
    little use for maintaining and tuning an existing bike. You will get
    much more use out of stuff that doesn't come in the tool box, like a
    chain cleaning tool and some bike specific brushes.

    That said, a good tool set is only going to set you back something like
    $200 and will last a lifetime.
     
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