What tools do I need to work on my bike...?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Holden, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. Tim Lines

    Tim Lines Guest

    Curtis L. Russell wrote:

    > On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 18:30:55 -0500, "tcmedara"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm guessing the next big thing is some Fred asking about "ready to order"
    >>tires. What's so damn hard about tapping your own rubber trees I must ask?

    >
    >
    > Finding one in the mood.
    >


    You nailed it. Perfect response.
     


  2. alan

    alan Guest

    I feel your pain! No, really, I DO feel your pain!

    Mine was a seriously stuck Regina or Cyclo. I attached the ridiculously
    thin removal tool with it's two puny little ears, pushed on a huge
    adjustable wrench mightily when it wouldn't budge, then slammed my fist into
    the benchtop as the tool rounded out. My language blistered some of the
    paint in the shop.

    I did something similar with a cheap open end wrench too. It opened up and
    allowed my hand to slam into a 1500 pound casting that was largely
    unaffected. I don't buy the cheap stuff anymore.
    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."


    "Curtis L. Russell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > At least you no longer need the 18 inch long open face wrench to
    > torque a freewheel off. And boots when you stand on the sucker to
    > break the freewheel free, when neither side of the rubber/plastic
    > hammer would work. Limped for a week once and the dog wouldn't go near
    > a bike wheel for a month. Could be worse - if the wrench hadn't hit me
    > and the dog, I thiink it would have gotten the TV set.
     
  3. On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 07:00:48 -0800, Holden wrote:

    > I would like to start "turning a wrench" at home. I have a nice work
    > stand, but no tools. I have kestrel/orbea frames w/ shimano components.
    > I have threadless headsets.
    > I have looked around at different "tool kits" by Park, Pedros,
    > Peformance, Nashbar, etc. but after reading some posts most folks say
    > you only need a few tools to do most jobs.
    > What tools *exactly* will I need to do most maintenance jobs, up to and
    > including removing chain for cleaning and making any other adjustments
    > in the drivetrain.


    I don't know who said you only need a few tools. There are lots of little
    bits and things that you will be frustrated if you don't have.

    1) allen wrenches. You need a combo tool to take with you on rides, like
    an Alien or the Park multi-tool, but don't rely on them for shop use. I
    really like having a set of allen-wrench sockets (you also need the
    ratchet if you don't have that, of course), and some T-wrenches of some
    sort. Get a good range of sizes (metric, of course).

    2) Chain tool -- get a good one.

    3) Special splined tool to remove the cassette, and one for the bottom
    bracket. You'll need either a big adjustable wrench or a 1/2" breaker bar
    to remove the bottom bracket, too.

    4) Spoke wrench. Again, get a good one.

    5) A good set of metric sockets. You'll find you need small ones, like
    an 8mm, so you might want a set for 1/4" as well as 3/8".

    6) A couple screwdrivers.

    7) Pedal tool. This is just a thin 15mm open-end wrench, but you need
    one thin enough, and standard wrenches are of course too thick.

    8) 14mm and 15mm crank bolt tools. For tapered cranks, you need the
    crank puller tool as well. I guess you don't need those for splined
    cranks, but have not yet messed with those, so I don't really know.

    9) 13mm and 14mm cone wrenches (for replacing wheel bearings).

    10) In case you ever get a threaded headset, there is a special size tool
    for that. I think it's a 32mm open-end wrench.

    11) Bike work stand. This holds the bike off the ground so you can work
    on it more easily.

    12) Wheel truing stand and dishing tool.

    13) Floor pump.


    With these tools you should be able to do anything except frame prepping,
    which you should probably send to a shop. This is probably more than you
    want to bother with right away, but gives you an idea what to work towards.

    I saw another reply talking about "chain cleaners" and "bike-specific"
    brushes. I have no idea what the latter would be, and have found chain
    cleaners worse than useless.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Deserves death! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve
    _`\(,_ | death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to
    (_)/ (_) | them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
    -- J. R. R. Tolkein
     
  4. Tim Lines wrote:

    > Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 18:30:55 -0500, "tcmedara"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I'm guessing the next big thing is some Fred asking about "ready to
    >>> order" tires. What's so damn hard about tapping your own rubber
    >>> trees I must ask?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Finding one in the mood.
    >>

    >
    > You nailed it. Perfect response.


    Nailed it? Tapped it? What's the difference?
     
  5. BIKE BUM

    BIKE BUM Guest

    Crit Pro is a tool & he probably could use the cash...
     
  6. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    tcmedara wrote:
    >>>> I'm guessing the next big thing is some Fred asking about "ready to
    >>>> order" tires. What's so damn hard about tapping your own rubber
    >>>> trees I must ask?


    Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    >>> Finding one in the mood.


    Tim Lines wrote:
    >> You nailed it. Perfect response.


    Stewart Fleming wrote:
    > Nailed it? Tapped it? What's the difference?


    Ask Heather.
     
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