what training needed for pursuit

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by legs gone, Feb 20, 2003.

  1. legs gone

    legs gone New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    i am looking to race a 4000k pursuit,what training do i need to do for this.i am mostly a road cyclist looking to try track racing
     
    Tags:


  2. mnetherc79

    mnetherc79 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2002
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
  3. VeloFlash

    VeloFlash New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    704
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2002
    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    0
    intervals intervals intervals

    you will need to do overspeed intervals and over distance intervals and its going to hurt a lot

    as veloflash said its lots of lactate tolerance stuff
     
  5. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2002
    Messages:
    3,866
    Likes Received:
    1
    As a 4-km pursuit is virtually entirely dependent upon aerobic metabolism, it's vital to complete lots of endurance training as well as completing long intervals (e.g. ~20-mins at TT intensity), shorter intervals (e.g., ~ 4+mins at just above TT intensity), and some very high intensity intervals (e.g., ~30 - 90-secs). It's also useful to use some RR's as training too.

    Completing very large volumes, mixed with very high variable intensity work is what the Aussie and Brit riders do (e.g., Chris Boardman did a large 3 week training block -- the TdF, then some track specialisation, then set records at 4km and 1hr).

    Ric
     
  6. steve

    steve Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2001
    Messages:
    5,255
    Likes Received:
    211
    Brad Mcgee also rode the IP quite well right after last years TDF, I think he also went on to win the world title in september!
     
  7. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    Figure out how fast your competition or category go. For example, if your competition is averaging 32 mph for 4 km, then you need to be able to go that fast. Of course, if you are starting out, you won't be able to hold that speed.

    Try to hold 32 mph for 1 km to start. Start out with something like one set of 4 x 1km at 32 mph, then work up to more sets of 4x1 km. Other strategies include: Decreased recovery between sets, hold 32 mph for 2+ km, stick with 1km sets but increase speed to 33+ mph, etc. Periodically, do the full 4km when fully rested to assess your progress, say once every 4 weeks.

    Keep your cadence between 100-110 rpm

    Good luck!!!
     
Loading...
Loading...