What type of durailers should I go with?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rdstair63, Mar 31, 2014.

  1. Rdstair63

    Rdstair63 New Member

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    Buying my first road bike. I'm looking at the shimano 105 or the Ultegra durailuers. How much of a performance difference is there between these two. Or any differences for that matter.
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    The inner parallelogram plate on the 105 rear derailleur is steel while it is alloy on the Ultegra ... THAT's where most-if-not-all of the weight difference comes from. The pulleys on the 105 have "bushings" whereas the Ultegra pulleys have ball bearings ...
    That is, the 105 derailleurs will function as well as the Ultegra derailleurs.​
    On the other hand, the bearings in the Ultegra & Dura Ace hubs are[/I ] supposedly better (at least, they were at one time) than the bearings in the 105-and-below hubs. FWIW. While I don't think that there is a meaningful difference, but others may suggest otherwise. Regardless, BOTH Ultegra & 105 components can be considered to be a bargain; so, you can let your budget & aesthetic sensibilities be your guide.
     
  3. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Alfeng is spot on on describing the two. They both are great derailleurs. Having said that when I bought my new bike last year it came with all 105 components, but for $26 more I opted to swap the rear 105 for the Ultegra but left the front 105. I did that because I felt, no real evidence of this that I could find though, that the bearing construction would last longer and be a tad bit more smooth in it's operation from the test rides I made of the two groups. But I also swapped the cables to Dura Ace 9000's, and those make the 105 lever action feel like I'm using Dura Ace components!

    So if you are buying a new bike and wondering about what to use I would not shy away at all from 105 if money is an issue, but if the difference is only $26 or so between the two I think that one upgrade is worth it. But I wouldn't bother with the front because I couldn't tell the difference between 105 and even Dura Ace! Nor would I bother with Ultegra levers because those do cost a lot more, and once I upgrade the cables there is no difference in the smoothness of operation.

    Of course of this is just my opinion.
     
  4. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    And to add another opinion to Froze's comment, many bikes already come with a rear derailleur upgrade as an option but I feel a better upgrade option (and this deals with the 2nd part of his comment) is not to upgrade the derailleur, but UPGRADE THE SHIFTERS (and also the cables). You will loose a bunch of weight (105 shifters weigh as much as a newborn baby), and will experience a better "feel" in your shifting (subjective). If upgrading the shifters though I would also skip the Ultegra and go right for the DA (taking obvious consideration to make sure component generations are synced up, i.e. 10/11 speed) .

    That said, from a performance standpoint one is just as likely to win a bike race on one as on the other.
     
  5. AyeYo

    AyeYo Member

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    Is there really no difference performance-wise between the bushings and the bearings? Are the bushings really that low friction? To me that seems like it could be a critical point of energy waste in the drivetrain, whereas a few grams of weight savings is trivial.
     
  6. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Quote:Originally Posted by AyeYo .Is there really no difference performance-wise between the bushings and the bearings? Are the bushings really that low friction? To me that seems like it could be a critical point of energy waste in the drivetrain, whereas a few grams of weight savings is trivial.


    First off, bearing losses are a really tiny, tiny part of a bike's overall losses. On top of that the derailer pulleys sit on the slack side of the chain, so they're fairly lightly loaded. There's really not a lot to gain there.
     
  7. AyeYo

    AyeYo Member

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    First off, bearing losses are a really tiny, tiny part of a bike's overall losses.
    On top of that the derailer pulleys sit on the slack side of the chain, so they're fairly lightly loaded. There's really not a lot to gain there.

    Good point. I didn't think of that.
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    10- or 11-speed?
     
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