What year was this trek made?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rick, May 21, 2003.

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  1. Rick

    Rick Guest

    Hello all,

    I'm considering buying a used Trek. It has a red frame that reads "2200 Alpha SL". The components
    look to be Shimano 105. The rear wheel is a Campagnola Omega and the front is a Matrix. It says Air
    Rail on the Fork. The seat is a Sella Stratos.

    The asking price is $500, it's not in the best of shape (looks to have been dumped a couple of times
    at least). The seller stated in his ad that the bike is "1 year new".

    Any advice on this is greatly appreciated.

    Rick
     
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  2. David

    David Guest

    First of all a disclaimer. I am no expert. But from the sounds of it, the rear wheel was replaced
    from the original. I'd have to wonder why one would do that while keeping the original front wheel.
    A nasty crash perhaps? I don't know how you keep the front wheel though.

    Trek used matrix wheels in the mid-late 90s. 1997 or so would be my estimate if my memory serves me
    correctly. I'd guess the frame is late 90s, early 2000s at the latest 01. A relatively quick and
    easy way to tell is to look at the headset. If it threaded, it is pre 2000, I believe that is when
    trek switched. If it is not threaded, most likely newer. Anyhow good luck, I would definitely have
    the frame looked over, if it appears to be taken down, there may be structural defects.

    David

    "Rick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I'm considering buying a used Trek. It has a red frame that reads "2200 Alpha SL". The components
    > look to be Shimano 105. The rear wheel is a Campagnola Omega and the front is a Matrix. It says
    > Air Rail on the Fork. The seat is a Sella Stratos.
    >
    > The asking price is $500, it's not in the best of shape (looks to
    have
    > been dumped a couple of times at least). The seller stated in his
    ad
    > that the bike is "1 year new".
    >
    > Any advice on this is greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Rick
     
  3. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >First of all a disclaimer. I am no expert. But from the sounds of it, the rear wheel was replaced
    >from the original. I'd have to wonder why one would do that while keeping the original front wheel.

    Front wheels often last much longer than rear wheels because the loads are less and there is no
    dish. Another reason is that it is often possible to lift the front over an obstacle at the last
    moment, the rear sometimes takes a bigger hit.

    But for whatever reason, wheels rarely wear out/die at the same time so having a different wheels
    front and rear is pretty normal for older bikes.

    jon isaacs
     
  4. [email protected] (Jon Isaacs) writes:

    >>First of all a disclaimer. I am no expert. But from the sounds of it, the rear wheel was
    >>replaced from the original. I'd have to wonder why one would do that while keeping the original
    >>front wheel.

    I have lost many rear wheels. All it takes is a good-sized pothole or a sewer grating, and a rider
    180 lbs or larger. The heat treated rims were the first on the part of manufacturers to make fragile
    disposible wheels. Once bent, a hard-anodized rim can seldom be straightened to perfection through
    trueing. I went through two of those.

    now i only buy 36H non-heat treated silver rims, and i haven't bought many lately!!!!
     
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