What you love about your recumbent bikes...

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Jon Meinecke, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    Here's a topical thread

    Many people here own or have owned many recumbent bikes.
    Someone in CA seemed to be practicing serial monogamy for a
    steady stream of recumbent bike models, seeking perfection...

    What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    didn't?

    No speculating on how wonderful (horrible) some bike you
    haven't owned might be! No big ha ha's over the BigHa
    unless you own one! %^P

    Here are mine

    '98 BikeE AT (original owner, still own, still ride)
    - PURPLE!
    - My first recumbent
    - Still fun to ride
    - Great utility bike,-- I have a 20 liter plastic storage
    box mounted behind the seat (also purple)
    - Quick handling and acceleration
    - Good rough-road/trail handling
    - Love the rear suspension
    - Has been very reliable, low maintenance
    - Now stays at work for exercise at lunch time
    - Top speed 36 mph, down hill
    - Often asked, "Did you make that bike yourself?"
    - Two falls, minor bruises once

    '00 Tour Easy (bought '01, original owner, still own, still ride)
    - Red frame, white rack
    - Wonderful bike, great cruiser
    - Touring platform, underseat panniers
    - Comfortable, Koolback Seat
    - 7000+ miles so far, many more planned
    - Front fairing only off the bike for transport, I really like it
    - Classic look and feel, great quality construction
    - Top speed ~46 mph, down hill, coulda gone faster! %^O
    - Four falls, moderate road rash twice

    '04 Volae Sport (bought '05, second owner, still getting acquainted)
    - Silver frame, red seat bag
    - Lightweight and, umm sporty %^)
    - previous owner bought with upgraded wheels!
    - 650C (571x23) few tire choices
    - really glides on smooth pavement
    - No bottle cage %^(
    - Nice seat bag
    - Mildly noisy drive chain (idler)
    - No falls, so far %^)
     
    Tags:


  2. What I luv about the NoCom is that it IS the Fastest Stock Bike in All the Known Universe.
    No other stock recumbent will ever be faster than the NoCom. EVER.

    Cheers,
    Johnny NoCom
    Fastest Bike in All the Known Universe
     
  3. > What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned?
    > What attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"?
    > Which didn't?


    Tour Easy: still fast, still comfortable, still eight feet long and a
    hassle to park or transport by motor-cage.
    http://www.easyracers.com/images/side.jpg

    M5 CMPCT: still folds quick and small, still only 7-speed.
    http://www.m5-ligfietsen.com/images/models/cmpct.jpg

    Cambie Recumboni X2: still fast, still comfortable, still ten feet long
    with the turning radius of a city bus, and even more of a hassle to park
    or transport by motor-cage than the Tour Easy.
    http://www.cambiecycles.com/x2.jpg

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     
  4. Since I can't find a political or H*lm*t thread I suppose I might as well
    bite on Jon's topical troll. I do love my recumbent bikes, but I believe in
    bike diversity and also have a bunch of road and mountain bikes that I also
    love dearly.

    My favorite recumbent for touring is an early model Ryan. The frame was in
    the first batch made by Burley in Oregon. It is the most comfortable bike
    I've ever ridden and when I refer to comfort I'm talking about all day
    comfort. I've never had a hint of RB from the Ryan sling mesh pocket seat
    nor have I ever heard of anyone else claiming RB from a Ryan seat. I can
    ride that bike in complete comfort for as far as my legs will take me. In a
    touring bike I'm looking for bullet proofing. If I'm 10 miles past BF Egypt
    and a 100 miles from the nearest bike shop I don't want something to break
    on the bike. The Ryan is remarkably bullet proof. Add quality friction
    shifters, a quality drive train, strong wheels, phil hubs and BB and I have
    supreme confidence the Ryan will make it through the Apocalypse without even
    noticing. I've ridding this bike for 15 years (I was recumbent before
    recumbent was cool) and never had a single problem. Once I was touring with
    a small group and a guy using a Cannondale rear rack (Blackburn lookalike)
    and it broke the third day out. The others of us had to split this guy's
    load up and haul it for about 125 miles to the nearest bike shop. He's
    lucky he was with friends. I use old Blackburn expedition racks or old
    Bruce Gordon racks I bought from Robert Bryant years ago. Nothing I tour
    with is wimpy, of unknown quality, or on the bike without a purpose.

    I've also got a '98 GRR that I bought used and nicely upgraded with Campy
    components and some speedy wheels. I use Shimano XL thumbies (friction mode
    of course) for some really smooth, can hardly feel it shifting. I love the
    GRR and spend most of my time on it. GRR attributes are well known. I love
    to polish the unpolished Al frame - a hands on labor of love. Love the '98
    RANS seat on the GRR, considered by many to be the best RANS seat ever.
    There's a lot to love about that bike.

    My son bought one of the dumped Trek R200 Treks from Valley Bikes with the
    $600 check he got from the first Bush tax cut. Unfortunately he doesn't
    ride it now and I've inherited it. I like the bike, its comfort, and
    handling. The bike gets no respect I'm sorry to say. Trek and Canondale
    could have made some possibly world class recumbents, but that wasn't to be.
    I would never trust the R 200 on a tour - way to much stuff to go wrong -
    real wrong. Plus I see no way to get a real rack on it. The rack Trek
    offered was inappropriate for touring.

    So what would you like to hear about next - my Bridgestones, my vintage road
    bikes, my mountain bikes, or my folders? Don't worry I have no
    grandchildren to tell you about.

    skip
     
  5. Skip,
    You can have your diversity. The Real Johnny NoCom has no use for bicycle diversity and is only interested in one thing. Going fast as hell on two wheel low splitterbikes. Nothing else will do it. I can guarantee you the REal Johnny NoCom will never be caught any where near a bubble bike or trike freak show. I have my aesthetics and besides wheel chairs are faster than trikes.

    The Real Johnny NoCom has been around long enough to know what is fast and what is slow. Slow does not cut it in the Real Johnny NoCom world.

    Enjoy your vintage two wheelers Skip. Bring one of your two wheelers to a race sometime.

    Cheers,
    The Real Johnny NoCom
     
  6. Al Luminium

    Al Luminium Guest

    "Jon Meinecke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Here's a topical thread
    >
    > Many people here own or have owned many recumbent bikes.
    > Someone in CA seemed to be practicing serial monogamy for a
    > steady stream of recumbent bike models, seeking perfection...
    >
    > What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    > attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    > didn't?
    >
    > No speculating on how wonderful (horrible) some bike you
    > haven't owned might be! No big ha ha's over the BigHa
    > unless you own one! %^P
    >
    > Here are mine
    >
    > '98 BikeE AT (original owner, still own, still ride)
    > - PURPLE!
    > - My first recumbent
    > - Still fun to ride
    > - Great utility bike,-- I have a 20 liter plastic storage
    > box mounted behind the seat (also purple)
    > - Quick handling and acceleration
    > - Good rough-road/trail handling
    > - Love the rear suspension
    > - Has been very reliable, low maintenance
    > - Now stays at work for exercise at lunch time
    > - Top speed 36 mph, down hill
    > - Often asked, "Did you make that bike yourself?"
    > - Two falls, minor bruises once
    >
    > '00 Tour Easy (bought '01, original owner, still own, still ride)
    > - Red frame, white rack
    > - Wonderful bike, great cruiser
    > - Touring platform, underseat panniers
    > - Comfortable, Koolback Seat
    > - 7000+ miles so far, many more planned
    > - Front fairing only off the bike for transport, I really like it
    > - Classic look and feel, great quality construction
    > - Top speed ~46 mph, down hill, coulda gone faster! %^O
    > - Four falls, moderate road rash twice
    >
    > '04 Volae Sport (bought '05, second owner, still getting acquainted)
    > - Silver frame, red seat bag
    > - Lightweight and, umm sporty %^)
    > - previous owner bought with upgraded wheels!
    > - 650C (571x23) few tire choices
    > - really glides on smooth pavement
    > - No bottle cage %^(
    > - Nice seat bag
    > - Mildly noisy drive chain (idler)
    > - No falls, so far %^)


    I'm a wimp. I only have two bents. '99 Vrex. Looked cool. Was scary to get
    going the first few times I rode it. I figured that thousands of owners
    figured out how to ride and I would too. All in all a pretty good ride,
    except for the butt discomfort and weird untanned bits of arm from the
    preying chipmonk riding posture. Replaced the seat fabric and used some JB
    weld and big assed pop rivets to fix the seat frame.

    Had a chance to buy a used red Speedmachine. Lots of upgrades needed. I had
    to buy a small seat because the medium one on the bike was way too long.
    Took a couple of different mechanics to get the Magura Claras dialled in and
    aligned to the rotors. I replaced the rear shock and put on a set of
    Stelvios. If I can get the miles up and my weight down, I hope I can get the
    machine up to it's name of speed machine. I would like to find a new handle
    bar (überman style) that has an inch more length before the bend to gain a
    bit of knee/thigh clearence. Did I mention that it's red?

    Re: NoCom. It probably is the fastest bike in the world, but like any
    hardcore racer it isn't for everyone. Just like a race prepped Suby WRX
    isn't much like an off the shelf WRX...way noisy, stiff and uncomfortable,
    just super fast and agile. Not what you'd want to be your daily driver.

    Most fun bit of a ride: A couple years ago, I was riding the 'Rex on the
    local trail. A young guy, late teens perhaps, blows by me and my Trice
    riding buddy on a GT MTB. I bolt and chase the kid down and latch onto his
    back wheel. He hammers. I hammer and I hang on. I can see the kid hit the
    hooks going into the twisties and see his rear suspension go squat when he
    powers out of the turns. I maintain my velocity, don't use any brakes, take
    good lines through the turns and the kid can't shake me for the mile or so I
    chased him. We finally get to a cross street and have to stop. The kid's
    breathing is a bit ragged and I'm carrying a huge grin. "Hey kid, want a tip
    on how to go faster?" He glowers at me. "Don't use your brakes so much". He
    takes off across the road with an angry expression, but I hang back to wait
    for my bud to catch up. Lots of fun, pouncing on the young and slow like
    that.




    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
    ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
     
  7. BikingBill

    BikingBill Guest

    The Real Johnny NoCom wrote:
    > What I luv about the NoCom is that it IS the Fastest Stock Bike in

    All the Known Universe.
    > No other stock recumbent will ever be faster than the NoCom. EVER.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Johnny NoCom
    > Fastest Bike in All the Known Universe


    I really want to buy one. Will you accept a check written in Crayon?

    Thanks,

    Bill
     
  8. BikingBill

    BikingBill Guest

    I've been riding recumbents for over 10 years.

    1. S&B USS Custom (16" front, 700c rear, Rans seat).

    I originally got the S&B in 1994, but had a custom frame built by them
    in 1996. With the Rans seat and the bar-cons on the extensions, this
    was a very 'plush' bike. I have over 15,000 miles on it ... but it's
    time to sell it.

    2. Homebuilt 'Heavy Metal"

    Built as an expriment to see if climbing issues were related to frame
    flex. Proved that theory and in the process ended up with a dual 20"
    recumbent that could be ridden hands-free. Destroyed by an idiot who
    opened a door on it at a train station. 10,000+ miles of riding fun.

    3. Zox Dual 26" FWD Z-Frame

    Fastest bike on the flats that I ever had. TT'ed one of these to a
    31:04 20km in 1998. Over 15,000 miles and it has to be sold too....

    4. Bachetta Strada

    The bike I really wanted to build. Rides and handles perfect, and
    climbs as good or better than Heavy Metal. Cleanest design and my girl
    friend doesn't think it looks 'geeky'.
     
  9. We're in different worlds Real Johnny. You are a speed freak. I am a
    tourist. I want to ride places I've never been before. I want to be a part
    of the world I'm riding in. You want to be apart from it and in the world
    of speed. Slow does not cut it in your world. Speed does not cut it in the
    touring world.

    On the other hand I do have this one road bike that is kinda speedy like.

    skip
     
  10. I never knew this was not a racing forum.
    And I never knew this was a touring newsgroup.
    Now the negative reaction to my posts makes sense.

    Geez. What the FOCK am I doing on this newsgroup?
    I gotta go.

    Later,
    Johnny
     
  11. BikingBill

    BikingBill Guest

    Don't let the door hit you on the way out.

    The Real Johnny NoCom wrote:
    > I never knew this was not a racing forum.
    > And I never knew this was a touring newsgroup.
    > Now the negative reaction to my posts makes sense.
    >
    > Geez. What the FOCK am I doing on this newsgroup?
    > I gotta go.
    >
    > Later,
    > Johnny
     
  12. >What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    >attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    >didn't?


    I've had one recumbent bike, a 2003 TE. What I like:
    - stable ride, particularly down canyons at speed
    - touring machine
    - exercises different muscles than upright bike
    - great look and feel, aerospokes, body sock,...

    What I don't like as much:
    - tough to transport e.g. airlines
    - not as stable on snow/ice as my upright bikes

    --mev, Mike Vermeulen
     
  13. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Jon Meinecke wrote:

    > What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    > attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    > didn't?


    Orbit Crystal (Speed Ross clone)

    Got me into recumbents for a very cheap second hand deal
    and was fast and fun. On the downside, if you hung big weights on the
    back the handling went a bit off, and being a tourer by inclination this
    was a problem. Was a bit of a rough ride on rough tracks, having no
    suspension. Died in an accident, RIP :-(

    Streetmachine GT

    A wonderful touring bike, incredibly comfortable and takes loads better
    than any other touring bike I've come across. Superbly built and well
    designed and specified. The suspension works very well and helps the
    bike cope with poor back roads as well as anything.
    It's rather heavy and a bit unwieldy if you have to carry it anywhere,
    and not that fast if you're not going downhill. I'd buy another,
    certainly.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  14. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    I've only owned one recumbent, though I've modified it quite a bit. I've
    had a V-Rex since about 1998. It currently has a Bachetta-type stem and
    handlebars and a Rohloff Speedhub with no deraileurs or idlers, set up like
    a single speed. I suppose there are faster bikes, and it's a bit heavy with
    the Rohloff. I've been thinking about switching to a carbon fiber seat if I
    can find one with the right top tube bracket and "sprint braces."

    --
    --Scott
    "Jon Meinecke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Here's a topical thread
    >
    > Many people here own or have owned many recumbent bikes.
    > Someone in CA seemed to be practicing serial monogamy for a
    > steady stream of recumbent bike models, seeking perfection...
    >
    > What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    > attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    > didn't?
    >
    > No speculating on how wonderful (horrible) some bike you
    > haven't owned might be! No big ha ha's over the BigHa
    > unless you own one! %^P
    >
    > Here are mine
    >
    > '98 BikeE AT (original owner, still own, still ride)
    > - PURPLE!
    > - My first recumbent
    > - Still fun to ride
    > - Great utility bike,-- I have a 20 liter plastic storage
    > box mounted behind the seat (also purple)
    > - Quick handling and acceleration
    > - Good rough-road/trail handling
    > - Love the rear suspension
    > - Has been very reliable, low maintenance
    > - Now stays at work for exercise at lunch time
    > - Top speed 36 mph, down hill
    > - Often asked, "Did you make that bike yourself?"
    > - Two falls, minor bruises once
    >
    > '00 Tour Easy (bought '01, original owner, still own, still ride)
    > - Red frame, white rack
    > - Wonderful bike, great cruiser
    > - Touring platform, underseat panniers
    > - Comfortable, Koolback Seat
    > - 7000+ miles so far, many more planned
    > - Front fairing only off the bike for transport, I really like it
    > - Classic look and feel, great quality construction
    > - Top speed ~46 mph, down hill, coulda gone faster! %^O
    > - Four falls, moderate road rash twice
    >
    > '04 Volae Sport (bought '05, second owner, still getting acquainted)
    > - Silver frame, red seat bag
    > - Lightweight and, umm sporty %^)
    > - previous owner bought with upgraded wheels!
    > - 650C (571x23) few tire choices
    > - really glides on smooth pavement
    > - No bottle cage %^(
    > - Nice seat bag
    > - Mildly noisy drive chain (idler)
    > - No falls, so far %^)
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  15. Arne

    Arne Guest

    I have one swb and one lwb.

    Rans Vivo (original model, 1998?): Soft ride, nice for goofing around on,
    like riding boardwalks, sidewalks, neighborhoods, etc. Not so good for
    riding a ton of miles in one day. A bit twitchy. Used on the NYC 5 boro bike
    ride a couple of years back (42 miles).

    GRR FoldRush (polished aluminum, ser no. F003; 2001): fast, nice seating
    position (for me), Mueller fairing, covers a lot of distance comfortably. At
    65 y/o, a 'lot of distance' is 25-30 miles. Really nice on bike trails and
    wide open roads.

    Didn't use the GRR on the 5 boro 'cause went down on a 'bike train' and
    didn't want any dings.

    I've tried others, but am not inclined to change anything (right now).
    ..
    Arne, USA
    ..
    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've only owned one recumbent, though I've modified it quite a bit. I've
    > had a V-Rex since about 1998. It currently has a Bachetta-type stem and
    > handlebars and a Rohloff Speedhub with no deraileurs or idlers, set up
    > like a single speed. I suppose there are faster bikes, and it's a bit
    > heavy with the Rohloff. I've been thinking about switching to a carbon
    > fiber seat if I can find one with the right top tube bracket and "sprint
    > braces."
    >
    > --
    > --Scott
     
  16. Dan B.

    Dan B. Guest

    Jon Meinecke wrote:
    > Here's a topical thread
    >
    > What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    > attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    > didn't?
    >


    I'm finishing up the build of my first recumbent, actually...a Tour
    Easy clone LWB. Assuming weather holds up tomorrow (Pittsburgh,
    Pennsylvania, USA), I'll finally get to see how it handles off the
    trainer.

    What do I like about it? The comfort. The aesthetic. The honkin'
    enormous cargo potential (Have I mentioned I want to start unsupported
    touring?). The flexibility; with proper tires, I feel comfortable that
    this bike will take me on any terrain on which I wish to travel. Oh,
    yeah...the pleasure of building it; it cost me slightly less cash (just
    under $500 so far), and I had a lot more fun than just buying a used
    one on EBay. I'm looking forward to seeing how it evolves, as I add the
    fun extra bits; the fairing, the bags, the clipless pedals.

    What don't I like? Dunno yet...I'll let you know in a couple of months.
    <grin>

    (Oh, yeah...and having a hobby that doesn't involve as much sitting in
    front of a computer is a pretty nifty concept too.)

    Dan
     
  17. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    Arne:

    Look, you know the real reason you keep the Vivo is that the babes dig it.
    As I recall you got open applause down on the national mall. Who could
    resist that?

    --
    --Scott
    "Arne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have one swb and one lwb.
    >
    > Rans Vivo (original model, 1998?): Soft ride, nice for goofing around on,
    > like riding boardwalks, sidewalks, neighborhoods, etc. Not so good for
    > riding a ton of miles in one day. A bit twitchy. Used on the NYC 5 boro
    > bike ride a couple of years back (42 miles).
    >
    > GRR FoldRush (polished aluminum, ser no. F003; 2001): fast, nice seating
    > position (for me), Mueller fairing, covers a lot of distance comfortably.
    > At 65 y/o, a 'lot of distance' is 25-30 miles. Really nice on bike trails
    > and wide open roads.
    >
    > Didn't use the GRR on the 5 boro 'cause went down on a 'bike train' and
    > didn't want any dings.
    >
    > I've tried others, but am not inclined to change anything (right now).
    > .
    > Arne, USA
    > .
    > "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I've only owned one recumbent, though I've modified it quite a bit. I've
    >> had a V-Rex since about 1998. It currently has a Bachetta-type stem and
    >> handlebars and a Rohloff Speedhub with no deraileurs or idlers, set up
    >> like a single speed. I suppose there are faster bikes, and it's a bit
    >> heavy with the Rohloff. I've been thinking about switching to a carbon
    >> fiber seat if I can find one with the right top tube bracket and "sprint
    >> braces."
    >>
    >> --
    >> --Scott

    >
    >
     
  18. Perry Butler

    Perry Butler Guest

    Current Bikes

    98 TAILWIND
    Pros:
    + Price
    + Easy on, easy off
    + Beginners can ride it easily
    + Old RANS seat that was made correctly
    + On nice tar a extremely comfortable ride.

    Cons:
    - RANS sells a intro bike with racing gears! Changed the gearing to 27
    speed with 52-42-30 front rings. Actually made this bike faster (except for
    top speed)!
    - 20" rear tire = rougher ride
    - Front wheel slips out easily. I have gone down on this on bike more than
    all the rest of my bikes combined.


    04 TOUR EASY
    Pros:
    + Awesome ride. A very comfortable ride.
    + Stable in rain - have a 2-300 miles in the rain (not sprinkles but rain)
    and now fully trust the bike. You do need to dress for rain to be
    observant.
    + Climb any hill - installed 46-36-20 chainrings and 26" rear tire for
    touring.
    + Stop on a dime - rear disk brake when running the 26" rear tire.
    + Convertible - can put on narrow 700 rear tire for slightly faster speed.
    + Faster bike - with the 700 rear, 451 front, GRR upgrade, and fairing this
    bike is fast. Of course, fast is relative!
    + Surprisingly the 26" wheel is not that much slower than the 700 wheel!
    + Airline bike - S&S couplers make this bike "airline legal"
    + Stable - have never gone down on any of the Easy Racers bikes I've owned
    (I've just cursed myself!)
    + Comfortable seat - I would get recumbent butt on the RANS seat but not on
    the Easy Racers. YMMV
    +++ This bike is a keeper!

    Cons:
    - LWB is hard to haul. Stairways are a pain. I imagine trains can be a
    pain.
    - Stock gearing is too high for our type of biking
    - Seat adjustment and removal is a PITA. Easy Racers needs to do something
    about this!


    97 V-REX(previously owned a 2001 V-Rex)
    Pros:
    + Great Seat - only if it is a pre-2001. Great Ride for a swb - with a
    pre-2001 seat and wider tires this bike has a very nice ride.
    + Climb any hill - I installed 46-36-20 chainrings
    + Easy to haul - fits in the back of our vehicles. Am thinking about S& S
    coupling this bike
    + Good Geometry - bb is about as high as I can tolerate. I have a bad hip.
    I've tried and don't like high bb bikes.
    + Great Hauler - this bike can hold as much as any bike.
    +++ This bike is a keeper

    Cons:
    - 2001 & newer seat - My 2001 had the incorrectly manufactured seat. Yes,
    I have seen some newer seats that were manufactured within specs. I have
    seen more incorrectly manufactured seats on the new bikes though.
    Unfortunately, for some customers, some seats were out of tolerance and RANS
    denies their problem.
    - SWB ride - If I ride rough roads all day I pay for the ride.
    - Suspension Fork - need I say POGO! I changed to the solid front fork.
    We like to climb mountains and this suspension fork sucks in this
    application. In rolling hills like in our area this is a nice fork.
    - Old original running gear is dated. In the next year I will have changed
    out the entire running gear.


    80' TE
    Pros:
    + Due to the relaxed geometry this is the most comfortable riding bike I
    have ever ridden
    + People point and stare at this classic.
    + Is my winter riding bike with studded tires and fairing.

    Cons:
    - Due to the relaxed geometry this bike is slower than my 04 TE
    - Old vinyl seat is extremely uncomfortable. Need I say sweatback and
    recumbent butt? Fortunately I have an early Kool Back seat for this bike.
    I also have a newer Cobra seat that I use in the winter.
    - 126mm rear dropouts/rear derailleur hanger - will not allow 9 speeds. I
    can go to a narrow 8 speed. I just don't trust the people I have talked to
    so far to spread my rear dropouts. Perhaps I'll ship it to Sheldon Brown!


    BIKES I HAVE SOLD

    2000 VIVO

    Pros:
    + Nice Ride
    + Old Style RANS Seat

    Cons:
    - BUZZ - I live in the country and the idler on the old style Vivo's
    buzzed. Drove me crazy. I bought it in December and waited all winter to
    ride the bike. When I finally got to ride the bike, BUZZ.............! Was
    told this was an inherent problem by dealers I talked to. I don't think I
    rode this bike 200 miles. For someone in an urban area this probably would
    not be a problem.


    2001 POLISHED ALUMINUM GOLD RUSH

    Pros:
    + Polished Aluminum is beautiful and low maintenance
    + Fast - light narrow wheels, fairing with body sock. This bike flew!
    + Other Easy Racer pros apply

    Cons:
    - Narrow high pressure tires create a rough ride
    - Handle bars were cut off to accommodate a body sock
    - Other Easy Racer cons apply
    - Owned too many bikes so I sold it instead of the Fold Rush. Wish I had
    kept this bike and sold the Fold Rush.



    2003 FOLD RUSH

    Pros:
    + Folds to fit on a rear car rack easier
    + Cushy ride
    + Can use the underseat sprint braces to hold underseat bags.

    Cons:
    - Installed the firmest elastomer from Easy Racers and the bike still
    POGOed climbing steeper hills. Terry had a medium/small and that bike
    POGOed even more. Perhaps the longer the Fold Rush the less it pogo's. I
    do have ideas on how to prevent this.
    - Does not really fold into a small package. Even folded does NOT fit in
    the back of my vehicles. You have to remove the seat
    - Removing a Fold Rush seat takes longer than removing a seat on a
    TE/GRR/TRR.
    - Due to the pogoing this bike is slower than my 04 TE. Last fall I took
    56 timings on my commute to work and back to reach this conclusion. It was
    slightly faster on the downhill route to work but definately slower on my
    uphill on the way home.

    Enjoy,

    Perry B




    "Jon Meinecke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Here's a topical thread
    >
    > Many people here own or have owned many recumbent bikes.
    > Someone in CA seemed to be practicing serial monogamy for a
    > steady stream of recumbent bike models, seeking perfection...
    >
    > What do you love about each of the bikes you've owned? What
    > attractive attributes lasted longer than the "honeymoon"? Which
    > didn't?
    >
    > No speculating on how wonderful (horrible) some bike you
    > haven't owned might be! No big ha ha's over the BigHa
    > unless you own one! %^P
     
  19. Lets see, in order of purchase:

    ---

    2000 Haluzak Horizon (new)

    Pros:
    - Good price
    - Excellent handling at any speeds from walking pace up to 50mph
    - A fun bike to ride. It’s hard to explain. Must be experienced.
    - Not as heavy as one would expect
    - Very comfortable once you learn to adjust the seat straps
    - Flexible rear stays work better than many suspensions on rough roads
    - You can carry a LOT of gear attached to the back of the seat
    - 100% reliable

    Cons:
    - Not very aero
    - Very wide.
    - The flexible frame starts acting like gel-lo above 50mph
    - Very flexible frame steals a lot of your energy when going uphill
    - Seat frame starts creaking after not too much use
    - Don't even think of attaching a whole lot of weight to the rear rack
    - Front wheel set too far back.

    ---

    2002 Bacchetta Strada (new)

    Pros:
    - Very comfortable seat
    - Stiff frame transfers power to wheel really well
    - Handles very well at high speeds
    - Good aerodynamics without the need for a fairing
    - Mixes well with road-bike pacelines
    - High seating position equals good view of your surroundings
    - Big wheels really do roll better than little ones.

    Cons:
    - High bottom-bracket not very friendly in stop and go conditions
    - High center of gravity combined with pivoting stem makes bike very
    hard to carry on stairs
    - Grossly overtightened bottom bracket
    - Grossly overtightened cranks
    - Stripped crankset bolt
    - Untrued front wheel with many lose spokes
    - Worthless front brake pads
    - Stem tilt mechanism that keept falling apart due to lack of thread lock
    - Cantilever type rear brake lever matched to V type rear brake made the
    rear brake useless
    - Self-destructing chain
    - Soft rubber chain idler that completely wore out in just a few rides
    - Badly assembled chain idler missing basic parts and did not spin
    - Bottle holder location makes it impossible to carry taller bottles
    without overstressing and often braking the bottle holders
    - Little gadget that was supposed to make-up for the wrong choice of
    brake levers is hard to adjust, and ceases to work once dirty, thus
    adding to the rear brake's worthlessness
    - Worthless rear brake pads
    - Untrued rear wheel with many lose spokes
    - Seat support pins that felk out after the little holes where they go
    into expand due to rider's weight
    - Bent rear stays
    - Bent rear derailer overhang
    - Company refuses to pay for the repairs or parts replacement on a brand
    new bike that they knew was defective in the first place
    - Company refuses to address their quality control issues in the open
    - You become persona-non-grata with the company if you ever publicly
    voice any negative feelings about the bike. They won't even respond to
    your emails eventhough you're a paying customer and still have the
    warranty, and they'll go the extra length by publicly claiming you never
    tried to contact them.

    ---

    1996 Easy Racers Gold Rush Replica (used)

    - Beautiful looking bike - looks like an Amish chopper ;)
    - Much lighter than one would expect. 24 Lbs naked, 28.5 lbs fully faired.
    - Stiff frame equals great transfer of power
    - No need for chain idlers, thus making drivetrian very efficient and quiet
    - Very comfortable seat
    - Custom handlebars make it easier to put power down on pedals and tuck
    behind fairing
    - Custom handlebars also place more of the rider's weight over the front
    wheel while reducing the amount of tiller, thus making bike track better
    at slow ascends
    - Climbs really well
    - Very fast bike once you add a fairing
    - Even faster once you add the bodysock
    - Very stable at high speeds
    - Seating position high enough to see around traffic
    - Low bottom bracket is a major convenience in stop and go situations
    - Very easy to add extreme cargo carrying capabilities for long distance
    self supported touring, with very little aerodynamic penalty
    - Long wheel base geometry, combined with Dura Ace brakes and Kool Stop
    brake pads mean you can stop very fast without risk of losing control or
    flipping over.
    - Full bragging rights package (it was Fast Freddy's bike ;)
    - 100% reliable
    - About 1/3 the price of comparably-specked new GRR. A lot cheaper than
    my low-specs Strada even before I had to raplace just about every
    component on it.

    Cons:
    - Very long bike can be a problem when transporting or storing,
    specially for us small-apartment urban dwellers
    - You must add a fairing to go fast
    - Since your draft is a lot lower than a road bike's, you're not welcome
    in pacelines
    - The forward-sitting position of the custom handlebars can cause
    recumbutt after long use. Thankfully bars also include a more relaxed
    position for most riding situations
    - Now that I've injured my right shoulder, I won't be able to carry it
    down the narrow twisty stairways in my building until my shoulder heals
     
  20. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "The Real Johnny NoCom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > What I luv about the NoCom is that it IS the Fastest Stock Bike in All the
    > Known Universe.
    > No other stock recumbent will ever be faster than the NoCom. EVER.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Johnny NoCom
    > Fastest Bike in All the Known Universe


    Jesus Christ Almighty! This is God Damn tiresome nonsense. Is Ed Gin crazy
    or what?

    Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
     
Loading...
Loading...