Whatever happened to maximum?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Geoff F, Jan 31, 2003.

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  1. Geoff F

    Geoff F Guest

    Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while and am curious to know why
    so many people use the term Œmaximal¹ where I would use Œmaximum¹. Is this typical American
    English usage?

    Geoff.

    --

    http://www.sputnik-one.com
     
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  2. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Geoff F wrote:

    > Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while and am curious to know why
    > so many people use the term Œmaximal¹ where I would use Œmaximum¹. Is this typical American
    > English usage?

    Maximal is an adjective, as in "maximal pedantry".

    Hope that helps.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  3. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Typical American English usage is post-literate. Rather than burning our books, we are busy
    convincing ourselves that they don't mean what our predecessors said they did and corrupting our
    language to make it so. The Silent Fire burns

    "Geoff F" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while and am curious to know why
    > so many people use the term Omaximal¹ where I would use Omaximum¹. Is this typical American
    > English usage?
    >
    > Geoff.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > http://www.sputnik-one.com
     
  4. Geoff F

    Geoff F Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Geoff F wrote:
    >
    > > Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while and am curious to know why
    > > so many people use the term Œmaximal¹ where I would use Œmaximum¹. Is this typical American
    > > English usage?
    >
    > Maximal is an adjective, as in "maximal pedantry".
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    > --
    > terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/

    Thanks for pointing out that maximal is an adjective. You are obviously very erudite but you didn¹t
    answer the question - ie why do you use maximal instead of maximum?

    Geoff.

    --

    http://www.sputnik-one.com
     
  5. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Typical American English usage is post-literate. Rather than burning our books, we are busy
    convincing ourselves that they don't mean what our predecessors said they did and corrupting our
    language to make it so. The Silent Fire burns

    "Geoff F" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Geoff F wrote:
    > >
    > > > Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while
    and
    > > > am curious to know why so many people use the term Omaximal¹ where I would use Omaximum¹. Is
    > > > this typical American English usage?
    > >
    > > Maximal is an adjective, as in "maximal pedantry".
    > >
    > > Hope that helps.
    > > --
    > > terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
    >
    > Thanks for pointing out that maximal is an adjective. You are obviously very erudite but you
    > didn¹t answer the question - ie why do you use maximal instead of maximum?
    >
    > Geoff.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > http://www.sputnik-one.com
     
  6. Geoff F <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while and am curious to know why
    > so many people use the term Œmaximal¹ where I would use Œmaximum¹. Is this typical American
    > English usage?

    My dictionary (WordNet 1.7) lists "maximal" as a valid synonyme for "maximum", when used as an
    adjective. The other dictionary (1913 edition of Webster's) doesn't list "maximal", though.

    URL: http://www.dict.org/

    -as
     
  7. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Typical American English usage is post-literate. Rather than burning our books, we are busy
    > convincing ourselves that they don't mean what our predecessors said they did and corrupting our
    > language to make it so. The Silent Fire burns
    >

    Yo, word.

    Mike
     
  8. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Geoff F wrote:

    > you didn¹t answer the question - ie why do you use maximal instead of maximum?

    I use "maximum" as a noun and "maximal" as an adjective. I don't know the etymology, but "maximal"
    has been in use for some time. You'll find it used commonly in technical articles, maybe because
    those writers are often using "optimal" and are comfortable with that form. Contrast "we have
    determined an optimal cadence", with "data point A identifies the optimum on the power versus
    cadence graph".

    The American Heritage Dictionary writes that "maximal" and "maximum" both can be used as an
    adjective, but "maximal" is never a noun.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  9. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    Geoff F <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sorry to be such a pedant but I have been lurking here for a while and am curious to know why
    > so many people use the term "maximal" where I would use "maximum". Is this typical American
    > English usage?

    I wouldn't say that "maximal" is *typical* American English; in fact, it doesn't seem to be at
    all common. It's considerably younger than "maximum", which itself only dates back to the early
    18th century.

    If you're really interested, you might want to try your query on alt.usage.english and/or
    alt.english.usage. Those groups love this sort of topic.

    --
    Ray Heindl
     
  10. Dvt

    Dvt Guest

    "Doug Huffman" wrote...
    > > Typical American English usage is post-literate. Rather than burning
    our
    > > books, we are busy convincing ourselves that they don't mean what our predecessors said they did
    > > and corrupting our language to make it so.
    The
    > > Silent Fire burns

    "Michael Dart" wrote:
    > Yo, word.

    Very funny! If this were r.b.racing, it would deserve my vote for post of the month. And it's only
    the second day of the month.

    Dave dvt at psu dot edu
     
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