what's a clincher?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Joel Rose, Jan 27, 2003.

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  1. Joel Rose

    Joel Rose Guest

    I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes. I know it relates to the wheelset somehow,
    but not exactly how. I am new to the sport of serious cycling and it is a work in progress for me.
    Becoming familar with all of the terms related to the sport is another aspect that I would like to
    improve on. Thanks

    Joel
     
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  2. The term "clincher" describes 95% (or more) of the tires used on bikes these days. It refers to just
    about any standard tire/tube combination, as opposed to a "tubular" which is a tube that's sewn up
    inside a tire casing and glued onto the rim.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes. I know it
    relates
    > to the wheelset somehow, but not exactly how. I am new to the sport of serious cycling and it is a
    > work in progress for me. Becoming familar with all of the terms related to the sport is another
    > aspect that I would like
    to
    > improve on. Thanks
    >
    > Joel
     
  3. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html

    "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes. I know it
    relates
    > to the wheelset somehow, but not exactly how. I am new to the sport of serious cycling and it is a
    > work in progress for me. Becoming familar with all of the terms related to the sport is another
    > aspect that I would like
    to
    > improve on. Thanks
    >
    > Joel
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Joel Rose wrote:
    > I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes. I know it relates to the wheelset
    > somehow, but not exactly how.

    As well as the tyres (or tires), "clincher" is also used to describe the type of wheel rim that
    takes clincher tyres.

    To put it simply, clincher tyres and rims are the ordinary regular modern types, not tubular type.
    (Also look up "tubular" in SB's glossary).

    > Becoming familar with all of the terms related to the sport is another aspect that I would like to
    > improve on. Thanks

    Sheldon's glossary is a great place to start. Bit difficult to stop once you've started reading
    though :) http://www.sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html

    ~PB
     
  5. Bantae

    Bantae Guest

  6. Pat Clancy

    Pat Clancy Guest

    Sheldon Brown, one of the regular contributors here, has a bicycling glossary on his web site. Check
    out http://www.sheldonbrown.com/glossary.html. It has hundreds of cycling related
    definitions/explanations.

    Pat Clancy

    "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes. I know it relates to the wheelset
    > somehow, but not exactly how. I am new to the sport of serious cycling and it is a work in
    > progress for me. Becoming familar with all of the terms related to the sport is another aspect
    > that I would like to improve on. Thanks
    >
    > Joel
     
  7. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Joel Rose writes:

    > I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes. I know it relates to the wheelset
    > somehow, but not exactly how. I am new to the sport of serious cycling and it is a work in
    > progress for
    > me. Becoming familiar with all of the terms related to the sport is another aspect that I would
    > like to improve on.

    To appreciate what a clincher is, knowing what a non-clincher is may help. Tires on. Before the
    invention of the wire bead (as on current car tires and many bicycle tires, tires were held on the
    rim by a hooked edge on the rim into which a fat bead of the tire was pressed by air pressure. This
    was the way car tires and bicycle tires were held on rims. When a heavy wire bead was developed for
    car tires, bicycles did likewise but with the light weight of bicycle tires, these could not hold
    high pressure, so the clincher AND wire/Kevlar bead came back.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/rinard/tirebead.htm

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.19.html http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.29.html

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  8. Dvt

    Dvt Guest

    Joel Rose wrote:
    > I am not sure what clincher refers to when talking bikes.

    A clincher tire has a separate tube and tire. These are by far the most common tires available.

    A sewup (aka tubular) tire has the tube "sewn up" inside the tire, and the tube/tire combo goes on
    the wheel as one unit. As others have mentioned, see Sheldon's web site for more gory detail.

    Dave dvt at psu dot edu
     
  9. Tdwfl

    Tdwfl Guest

  10. robertpalmer

    robertpalmer Guest

    Clincher is also a condition that accompanies front end shimmy at 55 mph. Usually right above the
    saddle. bp
     
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