What's a good air pump system on rides?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ns>, May 25, 2003.

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  1. Ns>

    Ns> Guest

    I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...

    Any help?

    NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)
     
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  2. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "NS>" wrote
    > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    > already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >
    > Any help?
    >
    > NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)

    Clear packing tape (get it at the Post Office) where the pump contacts the frame should protect the
    frame. The CO2 cartridges are a lot cheaper at WalMart, where they sell them to power BB guns.

    --
    mark
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "NS>" wrote
    > > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > > cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge
    > > system already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    > >
    > > Any help?
    > >
    > > NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)
    >
    >
    > Clear packing tape (get it at the Post Office) where the pump contacts the frame should protect
    > the frame. The CO2 cartridges are a lot cheaper at WalMart, where they sell them to power BB guns.
    >
    > --
    > mark
    >
    Yeah, a box of 25 is about $5 at Wal-Mart. I usually bring 3.

    The other alternative is one of the mini pumps that live next to your water bottles. Small, light,
    out of the way.

    I've found that using both is a good way to speed up the process: fill the tube with the CO2 first,
    then finish off with the mini pump.

    Mike
     
  4. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I don't want to carry around a frame pump

    I use Zefal's "Mini DoubleShot". It was the lightest of all the pumps I looked at and took the
    fewest strokes to pump up a tire of several that I tried out - including one with a much
    thicker barrel.

    It's so light and so small that I carry two: One in the bike's under-saddle pouch and one in the
    little butt-pack that I usually ride with. Reason: it's not all that robust-looking (although my
    oldest one probably has 50-60 flats to it's credit) and I figured that if I was hosed in the event
    of failure I might as well have the replacement handy...
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  5. Richard

    Richard Guest

    HHmmm, no pump nor cartridge system - got good lungs and a tight embrochure?

    Acually, I really like (and HAVE used!) a Topeak Mountain Morph. Since it is shorter than the "Road"
    version, it fits nicely in my CamekBak along side the bladder.

    "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in news:Mh6Aa.458306$Si4.395170 @rwcrnsc51.ops.asp.att.net:

    > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either
     
  6. Get a miny pump that attaches via the mounting bolts that hold on your water bottle cage. Simply
    remove the cage, replace the shorter bolts with longer ones and sandwich the pump mount between the
    frame and the WB cage.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  7. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Get a miny pump that attaches via the mounting bolts that hold on your water bottle cage. Simply
    > remove the cage, replace the shorter bolts with longer ones and sandwich the pump mount between
    > the frame and the WB cage.
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner

    Depending on what comes with the bike and the water bottle cage itself, you often don't even need to
    replace the bolts. I know that cannondales at least come with pretty damn long bolts, if they are
    3mm and pretty easy to strip.

    Jon Bond
     
  8. Buckaroo

    Buckaroo Guest

    The correct answer has been stated..... Walmart cartridges which are totally cheap and no pump!
     
  9. On Sun, 25 May 2003 16:35:56 +0000, NS> wrote:

    > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky.

    I don't know how a pump will screw up a decent paint job, but that is another story. There are pumps
    that mount on plastic brackets; some of them work quite well. But if you want something that will
    fit in your pocket, you probably will need a cellphone in the other pocket. They are a RPITA to
    actually fill up a tire.

    > I don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > cartridges are priced way too high.

    There are two kinds of cartridges. BTW, not air, but CO2. The expensive cartridges, which screw onto
    the inflator, and the cheap bb-gun cartridges that need an inflator that holds them in. The latter
    kind are a small fraction of the cost of the other.

    Is there a better alternative? I have the air
    > cartridge system already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm
    > hosed...

    A problem with CO2 cartridges.
    >
    > Any help?

    Live with the "damage" to the paint that a real pump will cause.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster. --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  10. > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    > already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...

    Get a pump strap that has an integrated foam pad that goes between the pump and the frame. That
    should protect the paint from scratches.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  11. John Albergo

    John Albergo Guest

    NS> wrote:

    > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    > already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >
    > Any help?
    >
    > NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)
    >
    That leaves mini-pumps. They'll do the job, but require several hundred strokes to get to high
    pressure. That takes considerable time and makes it that much easier to mess up the valve if you're
    using presta. By the time you fill the third tire of the ride in your example, you'll be seriously
    considering a better pump. The Topeak "morph" is a good solution. Very quick.
     
  12. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Mike S. wrote:
    > "mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>"NS>" wrote
    >>
    >>>I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    >>>don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    >>>cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge
    >>>system already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >>>
    >>>Any help?
    >>>
    >>>NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)
    >>
    >>
    >>Clear packing tape (get it at the Post Office) where the pump contacts the frame should protect
    >>the frame. The CO2 cartridges are a lot cheaper at WalMart, where they sell them to power BB guns.
    >>
    >>--
    >>mark
    >>
    >
    > Yeah, a box of 25 is about $5 at Wal-Mart. I usually bring 3.
    >
    > The other alternative is one of the mini pumps that live next to your water bottles. Small, light,
    > out of the way.
    >
    > I've found that using both is a good way to speed up the process: fill the tube with the CO2
    > first, then finish off with the mini pump.
    >
    > Mike
    >

    I do the opposite -- pump while it's easy, then finish off with CO2.

    David
     
  13. Jkpoulos7

    Jkpoulos7 Guest

    >The replacement air cartridges are priced way too high.

    If you buy from a bike shop. Go to x-mart and buy 15 12g co2 cartridges for about $4.00 at the
    paintball bb gun aisle.
     
  14. Ns>

    Ns> Guest

    Thanks everyone. The problem with the paint is from an older zefal pump (long since tossed) that was
    strapped to the top tube via a strap that had a foam pad. The foam pad wore off... The zefal pump
    started the paint removal and my paint has continued to come off.. That's the reason for the post..
    I will do both systems as previously mentioned. The mini pump and the wall mart CO2 cartrige
    thing... I keep forgetting about the paint ball popuarity keeping the costs of the CO2 cartridges
    down... That's a heck of a lot better than $7 for 2 cartridges.

    Done Deal!! Thanks

    NS
     
  15. Bob Denton

    Bob Denton Guest

    On Sun, 25 May 2003 16:35:56 GMT, "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    >don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    >cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    >already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >
    I use a Crank Bros pump which fits in a small seat pak, and an ultraflate with a couple of Walmart
    cartridges. I pump till I am sure the tire has seated properly and then give it the gas. I'll end
    up with 120 lbs out of a 12gm cartridge. The pump alone will get up to riding pressures if you
    have the time.

    cu Bob Denton Gulf Stream International Delray Beach, Florida www.sinkthestink.com Manufacturers of
    Sink the Stink
     
  16. "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    > already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >
    > Any help?
    >
    > NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)

    Scratched paint is wonderfully asthetic. It means you care about riding not looking good.
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, <Unknown> says...
    >I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    >don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    >cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    >already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...

    You have two choices. You either carry a frame pump that will get your tires up to pressure in about
    100 pumps, or carry a mini pump that will get your tire up to pressure, maybe, in 200-300 pumps. I
    tried a mini pump, and got rid of it after the first flat I got.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  18. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > In article
    <[email protected]>, <Unknown>
    > says...
    > >I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up
    paint job) or a
    > >pump that would be bulky. I don't particularly care for
    the ($$$) air
    > >cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    cartridges are
    > >priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I
    have the air
    > >cartridge system already and that's okay but, If I have
    more than 2
    > >flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >
    > You have two choices. You either carry a frame pump that
    will get your tires
    > up to pressure in about 100 pumps, or carry a mini pump
    that will get your
    > tire up to pressure, maybe, in 200-300 pumps. I tried a
    mini pump, and
    > got rid of it after the first flat I got.

    A good compromise is a good, fat mini pump like my Blackburn Mammoth, which is designed to fill
    low pressure MTB tires quickly. It won't get past 80-90 psi, but it gets there pretty fast.
    However, if you use fat tires like 28mm, that's all you need. IMO, this is one more good reason to
    use fatter tires.

    With all pumps, full sized or mini, fat means fast but low pressure, skinny means high pressure but
    lots of strokes.

    Matt O.
     
  19. "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I don't want to carry around a frame pump (screws up paint job) or a pump that would be bulky. I
    > don't particularly care for the ($$$) air cartridge type of system either.The replacement air
    > cartridges are priced way too high. Is there a better alternative? I have the air cartridge system
    > already and that's okay but, If I have more than 2 flats on a ride... I'm hosed...
    >
    > Any help?
    >
    > NS> (The slower fatter U.S. version)

    I like very much the Topeak Road Morph. For normal riding, it fits in my pannier, so I have it all
    the time with me yet don't worry about forgetting it on the bike.

    The Topek's designers have "designed" a plastic bracket with velcro straps to attach it under the
    top tube. As such, it is ugly and inconvenient. However, the bracket can be installed under a water
    bottle bracket for a much tider aspect. With the pump attached that way, I don't think there would
    be a problem with paint scratches, unless you do really bumpy rides (rough gravel...).

    I don't like the idea of disposable cartridges. Flats are unpredictable (by definition), so I want
    my pump to be there when I need it.

    One word of caution: the Road Morph's plastic head doesn't like being abused at -25 C. I since
    replaced the original hose with a dual-headed replacement hose for Topeak floor pump. Works great (I
    use a mix of Schraeder and Presta valves), it's winter safe, but not as lightweight!

    Regards,

    Michel
     
  20. Richard

    Richard Guest

    [email protected] (Michel Gagnon) wrote in
    > I like very much the Topeak Road Morph. For normal riding, it fits in my pannier, so I have it all
    > the time with me yet don't worry about forgetting it on the bike.

    For similar reasons, I like the Mountain Morph. Yeah, high pressure is tough, but it's doable. It
    fits nicely in my CamelBak...

    >
    > The Topek's designers have "designed" a plastic bracket with velcro straps to attach it under the
    > top tube. As such, it is ugly and inconvenient.

    True!

    > One word of caution: the Road Morph's plastic head doesn't like being abused at -25 C. I since
    > replaced the original hose with a dual-headed replacement hose for Topeak floor pump. Works great
    > (I use a mix of Schraeder and Presta valves), it's winter safe, but not as lightweight!

    You just hinted at one great Topeak feature - modularity! I have "a few" of their pumps, and I
    readily mix and match parts to get what I like.

    Another great thing is their customer service. I bet if you'd sent an email saying your pump head
    broke on a very cold day, you'd have had a new part within 4 days...
     
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