What's a good quality carbon fork?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ns>, Aug 15, 2003.

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  1. Ns>

    Ns> Guest

    I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi Nuova
    Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and chromed)
    nice ride.

    I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).

    I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    out there.

    Any help and opinions would be appreciated.

    TIA, NS
     
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  2. Ari

    Ari Guest

    can't go wrong with alpha-q http://www.truetemper.com/Performance_Tubing/alphaq.html

    "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:5Cd%[email protected]...
    > I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > chromed) nice ride.
    >
    > I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    > probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >
    > I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    > out there.
    >
    > Any help and opinions would be appreciated.
    >
    > TIA,
    > NS
     
  3. "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:5Cd%[email protected]...
    > I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > chromed) nice ride.
    >
    > I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    > probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >
    > I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    > out there.
    >
    > Any help and opinions would be appreciated.
    >

    Personally for myself, I wouldn't change the fork out on that bike. I can't tell the difference in
    climbing performance or effort between my 20 lb bike with a carbon fork and my 22 lb 1986 steel bike
    with chromed steel fork.
     
  4. In article <5Cd%[email protected]>,
    NS> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi Nuova
    >Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and chromed)
    >nice ride.
    >
    >I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    >probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >
    >I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    >out there.

    Most of the major brands of after-market carbon forks (Reynolds, Wound Up, Look, Easton, Time,
    Kestrel, True Temper, I'm probably forgetting some) make a fork that is good for some purpose,
    whether it's good for you depends on the details, if you want a threaded or threadless fork, how
    stiff a fork you want, desired geometry, weight, price, etc.

    Go threadless if you want maximum weight savings.

    A lot of people would say you're nuts by the way, since that is what I would call a "fine bicycle",
    plus it won't ever be really light with any fork, and won't have significantly better ride with a
    carbon fork. I suspect history will judge this like 1970's kitchen remodeling. :)

    --Paul
     
  5. Saltytri

    Saltytri Guest

    Yes, you can go wrong with an Alpha-Q. I bought one from a reliable net source. It had four visible
    manufacturing defects:

    1. a void in the laminate on the crown

    2. the metal sleeve for the brake shaft wasn't properly seated

    3. the laminate was rough and uneven at the base of the steerer tube where it meets the crown - not
    just a little but visibly ugly

    4. the metal ring on the steerer that takes the heaset bearing race was out of round by several
    thousanths and the race couldn't be pressed on

    True Temper customer service was downright snotty and didn't want to hear from
    me. I admit that one bad fork shouldn't be enough to condemn the whole company or the Alpha-Q line.
    Everyone is entitled to a screwup now and then but the true measure of a company is how they
    react to their mistakes. True Temper failed that test. I decided to risk my life to a product
    that is well supported. Reynolds has been great to deal with in the past, so I opted for an
    Ouzo Pro. Fortunately, the retailer was good as gold and sent me the Ouzo in exchange. YMMV
     
  6. Saltytri

    Saltytri Guest

    Clarification: Didn't meant to imply that I've ever had a problem with a Reynolds product. Just that
    when I've called or emailed them for infomation and/or advice, I've always been quickly connected
    with people who were pleasant, helpful and knowledgeable. That gives me confidence.
     
  7. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jfh%a.37159$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <5Cd%[email protected]>,
    > NS> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > >Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > >chromed) nice ride.
    > >
    > >I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    > >probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    > >
    > >I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    > >out there.
    >
    > Most of the major brands of after-market carbon forks (Reynolds, Wound Up, Look, Easton, Time,
    > Kestrel, True Temper, I'm probably forgetting some) make a fork that is good for some purpose,
    > whether it's good for you depends on the details, if you want a threaded or threadless fork, how
    > stiff a fork you want, desired geometry, weight, price, etc.
    >
    > Go threadless if you want maximum weight savings.
    >
    > A lot of people would say you're nuts by the way, since that is what I would call a "fine
    > bicycle", plus it won't ever be really light with any fork, and won't have significantly better
    > ride with a carbon fork. I suspect history will judge this like 1970's kitchen remodeling. :)
    >

    I ride a classic Colnago Spiral Conic SLX with a Time Carbon fork. The fork has some rake, and the
    carbon fiber kinda matches the dark blue frame color with black lettering (the frame was
    professionally repainted, but not in a Colnago paint scheme.)

    I never rode the bike with the original steel fork, so I don't know what I'm missing...but the
    Columbus tubing with the CF front end makes for a sweet riding bike.

    I'm now building up a Colnago Crystal with a Colnago CF fork.On this more recent bike, I don't mind
    the straight fork blades.

    Of course, my next bike *should* be a C40. Pre B stay, please, 52cm in blue. I'll let you know how I
    like it :)

    Lee
     
  8. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Forks shouldn't be treated as a component, but part of the frame. I'd stick with the original.

    "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:5Cd%[email protected]...
    > I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > chromed) nice ride.
    >
    > I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    > probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >
    > I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    > out there.
    >
    > Any help and opinions would be appreciated.
    >
    > TIA,
    > NS
     
  9. Royg

    Royg Guest

    Consider replacing the steel fork with a threaded Kestrel EMS Pro carbon fork of the correct length
    - Nashbar currently has them in several lengths for the bargain price of $130

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=&subcategory=&brand=1121&sku=196 9&storetype=&estoreid=

    These are excellent forks - was an excellent match with my Columbus Genius frame. By staying with a
    threaded fork, you can use your existing headset and stem.

    "NS>" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:5Cd%[email protected]...
    > I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > chromed) nice ride.
    >
    > I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    > probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >
    > I would like to use a Fork that is good quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks
    > out there.
    >
    > Any help and opinions would be appreciated.
    >
    > TIA,
    > NS
     
  10. On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 23:00:17 +0000, NS> wrote:

    > I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > chromed) nice ride.
    >
    > I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved will
    > probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).

    Probably one pound, more or less. Still substantial-seeming, but about the weight of that extra
    water bottle.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass. _`\(,_ | What are you on?"
    --Lance Armstrong (_)/ (_) |
     
  11. On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 16:20:25 +0000, KBH wrote:

    > Forks shouldn't be treated as a component, but part of the frame.

    Why?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Accept risk. Accept responsibility. Put a lawyer out of _`\(,_ | business. (_)/ (_) |
     
  12. NS-<< I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    chromed) nice ride.
    >><BR><BR>

    You will save maybe a pound on your rig with a carbon fork./stem/HS combo....so if you are a pretty
    standard 180 pounds or so...about 1% of the bike/rider weight...for about $500....

    Hard to beat the ride of a nice steel fork and the weight 'penalty' is small if not
    non-existent..besides, I hear your Masi crying from here everytime you mention a carbon
    fork to it...

    << Also, the weight saved will probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >><BR><BR>

    Even at 2 pounds, it won't be 'substantial' but it will be about 1 pound.

    Reynolds Ouzo Pro if ya gotta do it....

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. Ns>

    Ns> Guest

    Thanks for all of the input. I will probably stick to the chrome steel fork. I would be better off
    losing a pound or two (or 20) in my gut before spending the cash to get a new fork. I just am amazed
    at the weight of newer bikes that sport the lesser components (but are probably better now).

    The bike rides extremely well. I guess I am just getting Bike hungry again (after not needing to be
    for so long).

    Thanks again for the input...

    NS
     
  14. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Saltytri" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:20030815231544.1085[email protected]...
    > Yes, you can go wrong with an Alpha-Q. I bought one from a reliable net source. It had four
    > visible manufacturing defects:
    >
    > 1. a void in the laminate on the crown

    How did you detect this?

    >
    > 2. the metal sleeve for the brake shaft wasn't properly seated
    >
    This is normal. The sleeve isn't bonded.

    > 3. the laminate was rough and uneven at the base of the steerer tube where
    it
    > meets the crown - not just a little but visibly ugly

    ?

    >
    > 4. the metal ring on the steerer that takes the heaset bearing race was
    out of
    > round by several thousanths and the race couldn't be pressed on
    >
    > True Temper customer service was downright snotty and didn't want to hear
    from
    > me. I admit that one bad fork shouldn't be enough to condemn the whole
    company
    > or the Alpha-Q line. Everyone is entitled to a screwup now and then but
    the
    > true measure of a company is how they react to their mistakes. True
    Temper
    > failed that test. I decided to risk my life to a product that is well supported. Reynolds has been
    > great to deal with in the past, so I opted
    for an
    > Ouzo Pro. Fortunately, the retailer was good as gold and sent me the Ouzo
    in
    > exchange. YMMV
    >

    Your experience is exceptional, and you're claiming some problems that aren't problems. Why didn't
    you just stend the fork back and get another?

    I've installed quite a few of these forks as well as the Reynolds, and I've never encountered
    anything like this.
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, Qui si parla Campagnolo
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >nospam-<< Of course, my next bike *should* be a C40. Pre B stay, please, 52cm in blue. I'll let you
    >know how I like it :) >><BR><BR>
    >
    >If you want the ride, construction methods, better warranty and ti bits on a C-40-esque carbon
    >frameset, look at Calfee Luna, and save about $2000...

    ...and add 20+ years of warranty support.
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 23:00:17 +0000, NS> wrote:
    >
    > > I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi
    > > Nuova Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and
    > > chromed) nice ride.
    > >
    > > I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight saved
    > > will probably be substantial (a couple of lbs).
    >
    > Probably one pound, more or less. Still substantial-seeming, but about the weight of that extra
    > water bottle.

    I feel the power of Fabrizo...

    Always with the water bottles. You have to carry the water bottles, you do not have to carry a steel
    fork. There is no lightweight substitute for water.

    If you must make fun of water, make fun of the water in your adipose tissue. Tourist and commuter
    types like you with your pathetic 20% body fat give us serious cyclists a bad name.

    Carbon fibre fork, weight down to 160 lbs., and shaved legs. I'm going over to the Fabrizio side....

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  17. In article <5Cd%[email protected]>, <Unknown> says...
    >I may be interested in changing forks to a Carbon Fork. I have a 1990 or 89 model (CRMO) Masi Nuova
    >Strada. I am torn between a better ride and/or a seemingly correct, classic (but HEAVY and chromed)
    >nice ride. I will always have the fork if I want to go back to original, I know. Also, the weight
    >saved will probably be substantial (a couple of lbs). I would like to use a Fork that is good
    >quality, but I know nothing about the newer carbon forks out there. Any help and opinions would be
    >appreciated.

    I would recommend a Kestrel. They have been around the longest, they were the first to sell CF forks
    are upgrades.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  18. Mark Wolfe

    Mark Wolfe Guest

    It can change the geometry of the bike. Was thinking of an ouzo pro for my 1990 Paramount
    http://www.wolfenet.org/gallery/Bikes/IMG_0748 . The guys at Waterford recommend sticking with the
    stock fork since that was the way the frame was designed, and the Reynolds would raise the front end
    of the bike about 1/4" which changes all your angles. So I left it and did the weight savings
    elsewhere. It's not the 17lbs of my buddies new Ti Lemond, with DA triple, but I beat him up Torrey
    Pines hill by over 3 minutes yesterday, so I don't think bike weight has anything to do with it. :)
    Besides, I love the ride of my Paramount with modern components.

    David L. Johnson wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 16:20:25 +0000, KBH wrote:
    >
    >> Forks shouldn't be treated as a component, but part of the frame.
    >
    > Why?
    >

    --
    Mark Wolfe http://www.wolfenet.org gpg fingerprint = 42B6 EFEB 5414 AA18 01B7 64AC EF46 F7E6 82F6
    8C71 "Anyone attempting to generate random numbers by deterministic means is, of course, living in a
    state of sin."
    - John Von Neumann
     
  19. On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 22:43:56 +0000, Mark Wolfe wrote:

    > It can change the geometry of the bike. Was thinking of an ouzo pro for my 1990 Paramount
    > http://www.wolfenet.org/gallery/Bikes/IMG_0748 . The guys at Waterford recommend sticking with the
    > stock fork since that was the way the frame was designed, and the Reynolds would raise the front
    > end of the bike about 1/4" which changes all your angles.

    It's one thing to worry about putting a new fork on a 13-year-old bike, and another to claim that
    forks are inherent parts of frames in general. These days, fork heights are standardized, (and are
    available in only a few choices of rake) and most frames assume the fork will be built to that
    standard. I couldn't put a carbon fork on my 1969 Frejus, either, but that says nothing about frames
    built in the last 5 years.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or _`\(,_ | that we are to
    stand by the president right or wrong, is not (_)/ (_) | only unpatriotic and servile, but is
    morally treasonable to the American public. --Theodore Roosevelt
     
  20. >I would recommend a Kestrel. They have been around the longest, they were the first to sell CF
    >forks are upgrades.

    AND they have the best warranty! Steve
     
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