What's a good racing position?



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Randomchris

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I reckon you can achieve pretty much the same body position (with different arm positioning,
obviously) with bars close to saddle and low down, or further away (more stretched out) and higher.
Obviously this will affect handling and your comfort on the bike.

My question is - which is best for racing (and training for racing)? Long or low?
 
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Per ElmsäTer

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"RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
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> I reckon you can achieve pretty much the same body position (with
different
> arm positioning, obviously) with bars close to saddle and low down, or further away (more
> stretched out) and higher. Obviously this will affect handling and your comfort on the bike.
>
> My question is - which is best for racing (and training for racing)? Long
or
> low?
>

Not being compentent enough to answer your question. However it does seem to me that even if you can
get comfortable and efficient in both the scenarious you describe, what will happen when you get out
of the saddle for sprinting or climbing? I suppose we need to compromise somehow to be able to
change around.

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Tom Kunich

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"RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I reckon you can achieve pretty much the same body position (with
different
> arm positioning, obviously) with bars close to saddle and low down, or further away (more
> stretched out) and higher. Obviously this will affect handling and your comfort on the bike.
>
> My question is - which is best for racing (and training for racing)? Long
or
> low?

As it turns out the question can't easily be answered. Depending on each individual it differs. John
Cobb has a web site that answers some of your questions
http://www.bicyclesports.com/technical/index.html.
 
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