what's for dinner?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Drongo, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. Drongo

    Drongo Guest

    What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?

    I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself a
    morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I pan
    fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.

    Leftovers schnitzels are going into the kids lunch boxes tomorrow with
    corn cobs and cherry tomatoes.

    What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?

    t
     
    Tags:


  2. Drongo

    Drongo Guest

    What's a Maid-Rites?
    Is it good or bad?

    t
     
  3. On Tue 14 Mar 2006 05:32:25a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Drongo?

    > What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?
    >
    > I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    > freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself a
    > morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I pan
    > fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    > Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.
    >
    > Leftovers schnitzels are going into the kids lunch boxes tomorrow with
    > corn cobs and cherry tomatoes.
    >
    > What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?


    A friend had Maid-Rites shipped from Iowa. We'll be having those for dinner.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  4. On Tue 14 Mar 2006 05:40:31a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Drongo?

    > What's a Maid-Rites?
    > Is it good or bad?
    >
    > t


    It's made from ground beef, loosely cooked in a seasoned broth base until
    most of the broth is gone. The beef is spooned onto buns and usually served
    with mustard, pickle, and onion.

    Good or bad? That's a very personal thing. Folks who like them REALLY like
    them. They also have their detractors.

    Made-Rites is a franchise and the "recipe" is copyrighted. There are
    numerous copycat recipes for them on the web, but I doubt any of them are
    really authentic.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  5. "Drongo" <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and posted
    news:[email protected]:

    > What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?
    >
    > I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    > freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself a
    > morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I pan
    > fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    > Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.
    >
    > Leftovers schnitzels are going into the kids lunch boxes tomorrow with
    > corn cobs and cherry tomatoes.
    >
    > What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?
    >
    > t


    I did a chicken salad thingy. It was good. Your lamb sounds really good.
    Your kids are A okay in my book ;)

    Michael

    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  6. Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> hitched up their panties
    and posted news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue 14 Mar 2006 05:40:31a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    > Drongo?
    >
    >> What's a Maid-Rites?
    >> Is it good or bad?
    >>
    >> t

    >
    > It's made from ground beef, loosely cooked in a seasoned broth base
    > until most of the broth is gone. The beef is spooned onto buns and
    > usually served with mustard, pickle, and onion.
    >
    > Good or bad? That's a very personal thing. Folks who like them
    > REALLY like them. They also have their detractors.
    >
    > Made-Rites is a franchise and the "recipe" is copyrighted. There are
    > numerous copycat recipes for them on the web, but I doubt any of them
    > are really authentic.
    >


    *I* am a Maid-Rite fan. We had one of the stores in the town I grew up in.
    Springfield Illinois. I don't know if it's still there. Today I use Barb
    Schaller's recipe for them and make them at home. Mustard, pickle and
    onion RULE on a Maid-Rite.

    Michael

    --
    "The most remarkable thing about my mother is that for thirty years she
    served the family nothing but leftovers. The original meal has never been
    found."

    --Calvin Trillin
     
  7. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Drongo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?
    >
    > I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    > freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself a
    > morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I pan
    > fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    > Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.
    >


    We had beef tongue with one of Julia's incredibly rich tomato sauces, mashed
    potato/cauliflower, green beans with tons of garlic.I am looking forward to
    tongue sandwiches for lunch!


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  8. On Tue 14 Mar 2006 07:01:06a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Michael
    "Dog3" Lonergan?

    > Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> hitched up their panties
    > and posted news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Tue 14 Mar 2006 05:40:31a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    >> Drongo?
    >>
    >>> What's a Maid-Rites?
    >>> Is it good or bad?
    >>>
    >>> t

    >>
    >> It's made from ground beef, loosely cooked in a seasoned broth base
    >> until most of the broth is gone. The beef is spooned onto buns and
    >> usually served with mustard, pickle, and onion.
    >>
    >> Good or bad? That's a very personal thing. Folks who like them
    >> REALLY like them. They also have their detractors.
    >>
    >> Made-Rites is a franchise and the "recipe" is copyrighted. There are
    >> numerous copycat recipes for them on the web, but I doubt any of them
    >> are really authentic.
    >>

    >
    > *I* am a Maid-Rite fan. We had one of the stores in the town I grew up
    > in. Springfield Illinois. I don't know if it's still there. Today I
    > use Barb Schaller's recipe for them and make them at home. Mustard,
    > pickle and onion RULE on a Maid-Rite.
    >
    > Michael
    >


    Can you pass along Barb's recipe, Michael? I googled for it, but didn't
    find it.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  9. Jude

    Jude Guest

    Drongo wrote:
    > What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?


    Dinner MOnday:
    shrimp mole with guacamole and chopped tomatoes, served over softened
    corn tortillas, alongside calibacitas (squash, onions, corn, green
    chile sauteed together then tossed with cheddar and jack cheeses);
    southwestern caesar salad with cotija cheese and fried tortilla strips
    and chipotle ranch dressing, and a tropical fruit salad. Frozen
    margaritas to drink. Dessert was a pineapple-pecan cake with cream
    cheese frosting.

    Dinner Tuesday: red lentil, carrot and carmelized onion soup with cubes
    of paneer, roasted califlower and squash, and cornbread. Chocolate
    buttermilk pie for dessert.

    > What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?


    Well, yesterday she had pasta pesto salad, a string cheese, some
    grapes, and a rice krispie treat.

    Today she's got a wrap with white bean spread and sun dried tomato
    pesto and asiago cheese, carrots, grape tomatoes, apple slices, and a
    fruit roll.

    But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other
    kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    was okay with the other kids.

    Fun idea for a thread; I'm hoping I can get some new ideas! This week's
    goodies have been because we're in a lunchbox rut. Time to break out of
    it.
     
  10. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Drongo wrote:
    > What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?
    >

    Burgers, grilled dammit (if it doesn't rain again)

    > I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    > freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself a
    > morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I
    > pan fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    > Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.
    >
    > Leftovers schnitzels are going into the kids lunch boxes tomorrow with
    > corn cobs and cherry tomatoes.
    >
    > What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?
    >
    > t


    No kids here so I have no idea. When I decide to cook it just comes to me
    but I couldn't find any decent lamb at the store the other day. I was
    looking for shanks to make a nice stew. No veal, either... I'm craving
    piccata.

    When I lived in Bangkok I ate a bag of peanuts and a carton of milk for
    lunch. Wasn't big on the "hamburgers" or the "hotdogs" they served. It was
    ISB (International School of Bangkok) campus so there was no Thai food
    served; and there were no Thai students. Strictly families of foreign
    diplomats.

    I did, however, cook rice every morning for breakfast. That was the first
    thing I ever learned to cook, at the age of nine. On a pot, on the stove.
    No rice-cooker. Butter, salt & pepper. YUM!

    Jill
     
  11. elaine

    elaine Guest

    "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Drongo wrote:
    >> What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?


    snip.........

    But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other
    > kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    > where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    > was okay with the other kids


    Question:
    Did she choose to be a vegetarian or was that your choice for her?

    Elaine
     
  12. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Drongo wrote:
    >> What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?
    >>

    > Burgers, grilled dammit (if it doesn't rain again)
    >
    >> I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    >> freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself
    >> a morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I
    >> pan fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    >> Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.
    >>
    >> Leftovers schnitzels are going into the kids lunch boxes tomorrow
    >> with corn cobs and cherry tomatoes.
    >>
    >> What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?
    >>
    >> t

    >
    > No kids here so I have no idea. When I decide to cook it just comes
    > to me but I couldn't find any decent lamb at the store the other day.
    > I was looking for shanks to make a nice stew. No veal, either... I'm
    > craving piccata.
    >
    > When I lived in Bangkok I ate a bag of peanuts and a carton of milk
    > for lunch. Wasn't big on the "hamburgers" or the "hotdogs" they
    > served. It was ISB (International School of Bangkok) campus so there
    > was no Thai food served; and there were no Thai students. Strictly
    > families of foreign diplomats.
    >
    > I did, however, cook rice every morning for breakfast. That was the
    > first thing I ever learned to cook, at the age of nine. On a pot, on
    > the stove. No rice-cooker. Butter, salt & pepper. YUM!
    >
    > Jill



    Jill,

    You lucky stiff!!! Wish I'd travelled like that in my youth.

    How many languages were you fluent in, if that's a fair question?

    OB Food: Dinner: processed veggie burger with tomato slice with a swipe
    of garlic hummus dip wrapped in romaine lettuce and maybe another one
    after that.

    Andy
    ¿Dondé esta el bano?
     
  13. Jani

    Jani Guest

    "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other
    > kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    > where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    > was okay with the other kids.


    Ooh, that can be infuriating :( Luckily, the kids at my daughter's school
    are more intrigued than sarky about "strange" foods.


    > Fun idea for a thread; I'm hoping I can get some new ideas! This week's
    > goodies have been because we're in a lunchbox rut. Time to break out of
    > it.


    Let's see, what have I done over the last term or so ... a layered salad box
    (mixed green salad, pasta with mayo, grated cheese, grated carrot, olives)
    with a wholemeal or crusty-white bread roll. A baggie with a mix of little
    strawberries, grapes, melon chunks, pineapple chunks. Similar, with three or
    four different types of cheese cubes. Couple of mini-croissants with a tiny
    individual pot of jam (and a plastic picnic knife :) Slice of homemade
    pizza. Little carton of hummus with breadsticks. Whole scrubbed carrots; big
    slices of melon or pineapple.

    As we've now gone hi-tech with an unbreakable thermos, soup has also
    appeared on the menu :)

    Jani
     
  14. Jude

    Jude Guest

    elaine wrote:
    > "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Drongo wrote:
    > >> What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?

    >
    > snip.........
    >
    > But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other
    > > kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    > > where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    > > was okay with the other kids

    >
    > Question:
    > Did she choose to be a vegetarian or was that your choice for her?
    >
    > Elaine


    Actually, her New Years resolution this past year was to give up meat
    again.

    I fed her vegetarina food as an infant, but she was exposed to meat
    when she spent time with her dad, grandparents, etc. I never prevented
    her from eating any meat she wanted, including ordering chicken tenders
    off a kids menu if she so chose, but I did not cook it at home. She
    mostly ate veg and usually ordered veg at restaurants, but liked to
    have tastes of steak, chicken, and bacon. Didn't like ham or turkey.
    Never had the opportunity, as far as I'm aware, to eat lamb or pork.

    About a year ago, my boyfriend moved in. He's a meat eater, but loves
    my veg/fish cooking. He buys steaks and burgers and chicken when we're
    grilling, and he gets that pre-cooked chicken for salads or sandwiches
    at the store, as far as meat at home. We eat out once or twice a week
    when he wants a meat meal. I've been veg/seafood only for 18 years now
    (since high school), so I really never learned to cook meat.

    The kiddo enjoyed sharing his steaks, although she never got into
    burgers. She definitely liked chicken. And pepperoni on pizza. But she
    wants to be a veteranarian, and has decided she loves animals too much
    to eat them. So she hasn't had anything since Dec 31 2005. She's stuck
    to it well. (Only once had to pick the pepperoni off the pizza at
    school cuz they were out of cheese.)

    So it's definitely her choice at this point. Interesting to see what
    she'll choose as she gets older.
     
  15. Jude

    Jude Guest

    Jani wrote:
    > "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > >
    > > But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other
    > > kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    > > where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    > > was okay with the other kids.

    >
    > Ooh, that can be infuriating :( Luckily, the kids at my daughter's school
    > are more intrigued than sarky about "strange" foods.



    It drives me crazy. And they think everything's weird. Pesto is gross
    because it's green. Veggies and dip with string cheese is a weird lunch
    becasue nobody likes vegetables that much. Bagels are okay, but smoked
    salmon spread makes you smell bad. Anything in a wrap is suspect. and
    cut-up cheeses with crackers gets "are you too poor to buy lunchables?"
    !!! Hummus and pita chips and black olives and feta cheese cubes, eyew
    yucky look at the babyfood tara has. And on and on.
    >
    >
    > > Fun idea for a thread; I'm hoping I can get some new ideas! This week's
    > > goodies have been because we're in a lunchbox rut. Time to break out of
    > > it.

    >
    > Let's see, what have I done over the last term or so ... a layered salad box
    > (mixed green salad, pasta with mayo, grated cheese, grated carrot, olives)
    > with a wholemeal or crusty-white bread roll. A baggie with a mix of little
    > strawberries, grapes, melon chunks, pineapple chunks. Similar, with three or
    > four different types of cheese cubes. Couple of mini-croissants with a tiny
    > individual pot of jam (and a plastic picnic knife :) Slice of homemade
    > pizza. Little carton of hummus with breadsticks. Whole scrubbed carrots; big
    > slices of melon or pineapple.


    Your kids eat well! Tara loevs mini-croisaants but I usually fill them
    with something. She'd love a small pot of jam. I'd put a small
    tupperware of cottage cheese or yogurt alongside and then some fruit.
    She loves lunches like that. Thanks for the inspirations (and thanks
    for respecting our diet in your suggestions)!
    >
    > As we've now gone hi-tech with an unbreakable thermos, soup has also
    > appeared on the menu :)


    Always a good thing. Our thermos gets filled with mac&cheese regularly.
    Or spaghetti-os, She loves those things! Oh well, gotta give in
    somewhere, right?
     
  16. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Andy wrote:
    >
    > How many languages were you fluent in, if that's a fair question?


    Andy, you're obviously not fluent in English.... or you'd have written:
    _In_ how many languages ARE you fluent? Your command of the English
    language barely supasses that of Dumbdora.

    Sheldon
     
  17. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I did, however, cook rice every morning for breakfast. That was the
    >> first thing I ever learned to cook, at the age of nine. On a pot, on
    >> the stove. No rice-cooker. Butter, salt & pepper. YUM!
    >>

    > Jill,
    >
    > You lucky stiff!!! Wish I'd travelled like that in my youth.
    >

    Yeah, sure you did. Live inside a huge gated place with no friends and an
    alarm system. That was fun. I was nine; wasn't like I really wandered
    around much. I did get to walk around Sukumvit to some of the shops. It
    was there I got hooked on watermelon seeds. Yes, soaked, salted and dried
    like American sunflower seeds. Oh, and dried squid. Like jerky. Yum!

    I went to the Pratunam market with our maid once. Had a couple of baht in
    my pocket and brought home some tiny spotted fish. They looked like tiny
    whales; their tails were horizontal rather than vertical. I turned them
    loose in the fish pond under the steps. Unfortunately they died.

    > How many languages were you fluent in, if that's a fair question?
    >

    Put Thai nitnoy. Let's just say when I watched "Anna and the King" with
    Jodie Foster and that hunk of a (Chinese) actor Chow Yun-Fat, I understood
    some of what was being said. The Thai language is all about nuances. The
    same word said three different ways means three different things. You have
    to know how to pronounce things correctly, otherwise you're asking someone
    to step on your head rather than asking directions to the restaurant!

    Example (and I can't demonstrate the inflection here): Mai mai mai. It
    means the wood will not break. But Mai taken by itself with one inflection
    means NO.

    > OB Food: Dinner: processed veggie burger with tomato slice with a
    > swipe of garlic hummus dip wrapped in romaine lettuce and maybe
    > another one after that.
    >
    > ¿Dondé esta el bano?


    I think you meant to ask ¿Dondé esta el quarto de bano?

    Jill (giggling) Dinner will be Scottish ground minced beef with mashed
    tatties
     
  18. Jude

    Jude Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Andy wrote:
    > >
    > > How many languages were you fluent in, if that's a fair question?

    >
    > Andy, you're obviously not fluent in English.... or you'd have written:
    > _In_ how many languages ARE you fluent? Your command of the English
    > language barely supasses that of Dumbdora.
    >
    > Sheldon



    Hey, give him some credit. He managed to tag on a clause, so at least
    his sentence didn't end in a preposition!
     
  19. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Jude wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    > > Andy wrote:
    > > >
    > > > How many languages _were_ you fluent in, if that's a fair question?

    > >
    > > Andy, you're obviously not fluent in English.... or you'd have written:
    > > _In_ how many languages ARE you fluent? Your command of the English
    > > language barely surpasses that of Dumbdora.
    > >
    > > Sheldon

    >
    >
    > Hey, give him some credit. He managed to tag on a clause, so at least
    > his sentence didn't end in a preposition!


    Yeah, but... _"were"_ Andy fluent in (whatever), then he'd be dead.
    hehe

    Sheldon
     
  20. "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" <[email protected]> writes:

    >I did a chicken salad thingy. It was good. Your lamb sounds really good.


    I did chicken salad, too. Now I don't feel so bad.
    I grilled some chicken and put it on a bed of mixed greens, bacon,
    tomato, chopped sweet yellow pepper, blue cheese crumbles and asiago.
    It's tasty stuff.
    The lamb sounds really good though. Yum!

    Stacia
     
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