what's for dinner?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Drongo, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. "Jude" <[email protected]> writes:

    >It drives me crazy. And they think everything's weird. Pesto is gross
    >because it's green. Veggies and dip with string cheese is a weird lunch
    >becasue nobody likes vegetables that much. Bagels are okay, but smoked
    >salmon spread makes you smell bad. Anything in a wrap is suspect. and
    >cut-up cheeses with crackers gets "are you too poor to buy lunchables?"


    When I was a kid, no one cared what you ate for lunch. I always
    brought leftovers of dinner the night before and no one said anything
    about it being weird. Guess it's a whole new world.

    Stacia
     


  2. Sheldon wrote:

    >Andy wrote:
    >
    >
    >>How many languages were you fluent in, if that's a fair question?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Andy, you're obviously not fluent in English.... or you'd have written:
    >_In_ how many languages ARE you fluent? Your command of the English
    >language barely supasses that of Dumbdora.
    >
    >Sheldon
    >
    >
    >

    Ah, the evils of ending a sentence with a preposition. I am with Winston
    Churchill, it is something up with which I will not put. Get real
    Sheldon, he didn't even finish the sentence, there's nothing wrong with
    his usage. And lose a mark for misspelling "surpasses".

    Christine
     
  3. modom

    modom Guest

    On 14 Mar 2006 04:32:25 -0800, "Drongo" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >What are you or did you have for dinner tonight?
    >
    >I crumbed lamb rump fillets in bread crumbs that I seasoned with
    >freshly ground fennel seed and black peppercorns. Finally got myself a
    >morter and pestle satisfyingly big enough for pounding up spices. I pan
    >fried the lamb in olive oil and baby spinach salad on the side.
    >Delicious! My children will eat anything if it's crumbed.
    >
    >Leftovers schnitzels are going into the kids lunch boxes tomorrow with
    >corn cobs and cherry tomatoes.
    >
    >What do others put in kids' lunchboxes?
    >
    >t


    My kid's not at home these days.

    Dinner tonight was a celebration of a friend's birthday. We went to
    Tei Tei in Dallas.
    http://www.dallasdinesout.com/restrant/t/teitei/teitei.htm

    We ate very well. Grilled sea bass, yellow tail sushi, softshell crab
    roll, asparagus tempura, edamame, lamb chops, pork dumplings, asian
    green salad, panna cotta, and more.
    --
    modom
     
  4. Jani

    Jani Guest

    "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other
    > kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    > where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    > was okay with the other kids.


    Ooh, that can be infuriating :( Luckily, the kids at my daughter's school
    are more intrigued than sarky about "strange" foods.


    > Fun idea for a thread; I'm hoping I can get some new ideas! This week's
    > goodies have been because we're in a lunchbox rut. Time to break out of
    > it.


    Let's see, what have I done over the last term or so ... a layered salad box
    (mixed green salad, pasta with mayo, grated cheese, grated carrot, olives)
    with a wholemeal or crusty-white bread roll. A baggie with a mix of little
    strawberries, grapes, melon chunks, pineapple chunks. Similar, with three or
    four different types of cheese cubes. Couple of mini-croissants with a tiny
    individual pot of jam (and a plastic picnic knife :) Slice of homemade
    pizza. Little carton of hummus with breadsticks. Whole scrubbed carrots; big
    slices of melon or pineapple.

    As we've now gone hi-tech with an unbreakable thermos, soup has also
    appeared on the menu :)

    Jani
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > and
    > cut-up cheeses with crackers gets "are you too poor to buy lunchables?"


    Yikes, tough crowd! We send cut up veggies, cheese and crackers and
    such, and it is partially because it does cost less than the prepackaged
    stuff, but also because it doesn't have all the added salts,
    preservatives, etc. Our kids make homemade Valentines, too. ;)

    They are in a private school, and so I worry that one day they will
    hear something like this, because we can afford tuition because we are
    frugal in most areas. So far, though, they haven't had anyone say
    anything. Although, Alexander felt bad about his Valentines when he saw
    all the mass produced junk the other kids had. Luckily his teacher told
    him how nice his were, and one of the girls in class said that his were
    the best she got.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  6. Jani

    Jani Guest

    (had to cut and paste from Google since neither my post nor Jude's appeared
    on my server ... sorry if it messes up the threading on other people's
    newsreaders :(


    Jani wrote:
    > "Jude" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]


    >> > But of course, we're vegetarian and pretty healthy eaters, so the other

    > > kids make fun of whats in her lunchbox a lot. She went through a phase
    > > where all she would take was PB&J or a cream-cheese bagel becasue that
    >> > was okay with the other kids.



    >> Ooh, that can be infuriating :( Luckily, the kids at my daughter's school
    >> are more intrigued than sarky about "strange" foods.




    >It drives me crazy. And they think everything's weird. Pesto is gross

    because it's green. Veggies and dip with string cheese is a weird lunch
    >becasue nobody likes vegetables that much. Bagels are okay, but smoked
    >salmon spread makes you smell bad. Anything in a wrap is suspect. and
    >cut-up cheeses with crackers gets "are you too poor to buy lunchables?"


    Argh, the dreaded lunchables! Luckily I live in a fairly parsimonious area
    of northern England, where "my mum says she is *not* paying two quid for a
    bit of processed cheese and two cream crackers" is considered a perfectly
    acceptable comment :)


    >!!! Hummus and pita chips and black olives and feta cheese cubes, eyew
    >yucky look at the babyfood tara has. And on and on.


    That's a shame. (I asked my kids what they'd say to someone who thought
    olives and feta was baby food, and they said "Huh? tell them that's
    *grown-up* food, and maybe someday they'll grow into it!")


    []

    >> Let's see, what have I done over the last term or so ... a layered salad
    >> box

    > (mixed green salad, pasta with mayo, grated cheese, grated carrot, olives)
    >> with a wholemeal or crusty-white bread roll. A baggie with a mix of
    >> little

    > strawberries, grapes, melon chunks, pineapple chunks. Similar, with three
    > or four different types of cheese cubes. Couple of mini-croissants with a
    > tiny individual pot of jam (and a plastic picnic knife :) Slice of
    > homemade
    >> pizza. Little carton of hummus with breadsticks. Whole scrubbed carrots;
    >> big slices of melon or pineapple.




    >Your kids eat well!


    Oh, we have phases of tuna-on-white and a packet of crisps, as well :)

    >Tara loevs mini-croisaants but I usually fill them

    with something. She'd love a small pot of jam. I'd put a small
    >tupperware of cottage cheese or yogurt alongside and then some fruit.

    She loves lunches like that. Thanks for the inspirations (and thanks
    >for respecting our diet in your suggestions)!


    You're welcome :) Nuts'n'raisins was another one my kids mentioned, and
    tropical mix - not sure what it's called in the US, but it's a mix of dried
    fruits, banana chips and coconut shreds.


    > As we've now gone hi-tech with an unbreakable thermos, soup has also
    > appeared on the menu :)



    Always a good thing. Our thermos gets filled with mac&cheese regularly.
    Or spaghetti-os, She loves those things! Oh well, gotta give in
    somewhere, right?

    Oh, absolutely. My other daughter lived on curly fries when she first
    started school dinners (lunchboxes are apparently Less Kewl at secondary
    school) but the craze now seems to have worn off :)

    Jani
     
  7. Drongo

    Drongo Guest

    Handmade trumps processed crap anyday in my book! Good on you. Frugal
    and good for them.

    I love making my kids lunches. I love when their lunch boxes come home
    empty and the teachers comment on how well my kids eat and how healthy
    and interesting their lunchboxes are. Are lunchables those awful things
    with uniform circles of 'meat' and cheese that does not need to be
    refrigerated. Oh they frighten me. I have seen them in US magazines I
    subscribe to...

    Tomorrow, my kids are having jelly made from orange and mango juice and
    gelatine, with chunks of mango in it. I have grilled some chicken
    drumsticks and I wrap them in foil and tie a ribbon around the parcel
    so it's like a shiny present. My daughter likes to be like all the
    other kids so I include a token vegemite sandwich, wholemeal bread no
    crusts. And a handful of cherry tomatoes.

    Tonight we had osso bucco for dinner. Nice little veal shanks cooked in
    passata, onion, garlic and ros`e. Lots of gremolata and romana on
    top.Big radicchio salad dressed in lemon juice and olive oil. Husband
    and I drank the leftover ros`e with dinner. Children had pink lemonade
    in wine glasses.

    No leftovers. : (
    I like a second dinner of leftovers to eat while I watch The Biggest
    Loser!


    t
     
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