What's the best clipless pedals for a newbie roadie with bad knees?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Newbie Roadie, Sep 4, 2006.

  1. Newbie Roadie

    Newbie Roadie New Member

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    Hi I just got my first road bike and have to get clipless pedals. It's a Trek Pilot 5.2 WSD. I used clipless pedals about 10 years ago on my mountain bike. Since then I stopped using clipless due to bad knees -- patellar tendonitis. What is the best brand of clipless pedals for bad knees? Thanks!!!!:)
     
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  2. fauxpas

    fauxpas New Member

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    Is the 'bad knee' thing bad with clipless due to having to supinate the leg to uncleat?

    If so, any of the low-middle of the road clipless pedals have tension adjustment to make this easier...

    I did find normal SPD cleats were a lot easier to uncleat than my new SPD-SL.
     
  3. free_rideman

    free_rideman New Member

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    If you have bad knees, definitely go with speedplay pedals. They have the most float which shouldn't cause any pressure on your joints.

    I have a friend that has bad knees, and these are the only pedals he can really ride with.

    But go to a LBS and check them out first.
     
  4. Jemsquash

    Jemsquash New Member

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    Last time you had knee issues, did you seek medical advise? I would advise seeing a physiotherapist (should it flare up again) and ensuring that you measure and fit the bicycle correctly.

    Otherwise I am not an expert on pedals, but some degree of float is necessary. Float means free sideways movement, so that you can typically move you foot through 6 - 12 degrees to the left and right before hitting resistance and then clicking out.
     
  5. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    Regardless of which pedals you get, you need to play good attention to making sure that the cleat is correctly positioned on the shoe and that your riding position is correct.

    I'd recommend paying the extra to get the pedals from the LBS where the experienced staff member can make sure that everything is correct.

    I've heard that speedplay are the easiest to get out of.

    A few years back a rider with bad knees told me that he used no float because of his knees, ie the feet were locked in place. I found this supprising as I would of thought that you need more float not less if you have knee problems.
     
  6. Bob Ross

    Bob Ross New Member

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    I have super-nasty-bad chondramalacia patella in both knees from 20 years crawling around stages as an audio technician, plus a mega-fukt-up left ACL due to a snowboarding accident. I went with Speedplay Frogs and have absolutely *no* problems with my knees when cycling. In fact, the Frogs are better on my knees than platform pedals were!


    And yes, they're very easy to get out of.
     
  7. graphixgeek

    graphixgeek New Member

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    I use Speedplay frogs and they are super easy on the knees. The x-series road pedals have adjustable float in case the large amount of float is disconcerting at first.
     
  8. serenaslu

    serenaslu New Member

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    I don't use Speedplays, so I apologize if I am speaking out of school; but I thought that the X-series were not adjustable, while the Zero series from Speedplay were.
     
  9. domaindomain

    domaindomain New Member

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    I think any of the main brand / styles - Look, Crank Bros, Time, SPD - would be OK as long as they were adjustable and you adjusted them to suit yourself.
     
  10. graphixgeek

    graphixgeek New Member

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    Thanks serenaslu, you are right, the zeroes are adjustable, not the x-series....I got them mixed up[​IMG]
     
  11. Orcanova

    Orcanova New Member

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    The Speedplay zeros are adjustable float. the Speedplay X pedals are free float, which gives you a very wide range of positioning. I am not sure but I think the Zero's can be adjusted to as wide of a float as the x's.

    I have ridden Speedplay x pedals for the last 10 years and they are awesome. Your foot just naturally falls into its most biomechanically neutral position.

    It is not a sloppy ride either, it just feels right.

    Ditto the poster above about a proper bike fit at a pro shop with special attention to saddle and cleat positioning (and stem). That along with Speedplay's is probably as good as it gets.
     
  12. ruski

    ruski New Member

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    I've developed some major knee pain under my patella and my knee has become quite inflamed, I'm currently using SPD-SLs.. worth thinking about the Speedplay X's?
     
  13. Rockslayer

    Rockslayer New Member

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    I don't know if this is any help but I use Shimano M520 spd on my MTB.
    I had a bingle in Feb on the snowboard in the Railpark and smashed my Meniscus/knee. I still get pains in the knee every now and then but seem to be okay when I am riding. I have the pedals adjusted as loose as possible to allow my foot to rotate a little without the shoe popping out too easily.

    I been riding since April and I find I don't get any pains when I am riding, I thought I go offroad as a low impact sport. I say that is the case in pedalling and riding over technical terrain I guess having suspension helps in my case.( of course no such thing as a low impact crash)

    Better to go see a specialist, try work reducing/eliminating the cause rather than work around symptoms.

    Cheers
     
  14. John M

    John M New Member

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    Try positioning the cleats a bit farther back on the shoe (up to 1 cm BEHIND the ball of the foot). This will take some pressure off of the quads and therefore the patellar tendon and recruit your gluts and hamstrings a bit more. Also consider lowering your saddle a little bit for additional relief of the quads.
     
  15. John M

    John M New Member

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    Ruski, see my post to Newbie about cleat position in this same thread.
     
  16. ruski

    ruski New Member

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    Thanks mate.
     
  17. RaceMachine

    RaceMachine New Member

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    my 2 cents: i use crank bros eggbeaters - i find that when unclipping, i don't feel myself hitting that "release point" as in SPDs. it is a very smooth release:)
     
  18. carbonguru

    carbonguru New Member

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    Speedplay Zeros. Hands Down. :)



     
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