What's The Best Way to Sell a Custom Road Bike? EBay? Craigslist? VeloNews?



F

Fitz

Guest
Greetings,

I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
bikes to the "target demographic?"

I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

Thanks!

Fitz
 
On Apr 9, 7:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Greetings,
>
> I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.
>
> I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> bikes to the "target demographic?"
>
> I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .
>
> Thanks!
>
> Fitz


I'd go for eBay. But I'd put a pretty high reserve, unless you are in
a hurry.

Are you sure your cycling is over?

How big are you? I know a guy 6'8" looking for a bike.

Joseph
 
On Apr 9, 12:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Greetings,
>
> I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.
>
> I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> bikes to the "target demographic?"
>
> I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .
>
> Thanks!
>
> Fitz



E-bay would be my choice but, if you would be new to E-bay, I'd
suggest you get a friend to help you as there are some really evil
scammers that sometimes get through E-bay security.

Lewis.

*****
 
On Sun, 08 Apr 2007 22:16:20 -0700, Fitz wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.
>
> I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> bikes to the "target demographic?"
>
> I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .
>


On a hunch, I went to Leonard Zinn's website and sure enough there's a
"used bikes" link there. Also, I'd talk to Zinn. He may be able to
recommend your bike to someone for whom a custom bike doesn't work out
(e.g., someone who needs a bike in a hurry).
 
On Apr 9, 8:37 am, Gary Young <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Sun, 08 Apr 2007 22:16:20 -0700, Fitz wrote:
> > Greetings,

>
> > I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> > 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> On a hunch, I went to Leonard Zinn's website and sure enough there's a
> "used bikes" link there. Also, I'd talk to Zinn. He may be able to
> recommend your bike to someone for whom a custom bike doesn't work out
> (e.g., someone who needs a bike in a hurry).


Try the Serotta forum at: http://www.serotta.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=6

Alan
 
In article <[email protected]>,
"Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.


Sorry to hear that! Ouch.

> I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> bikes to the "target demographic?"
>
> I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .


You're pretty much going to lose your shorts. Bikes just don't retain
resale value very well. You might as well resign yourself to that. If
you get half of what you paid for it, you'll have done well.

I'd try Craigslist first to sell locally and avoid shipping, plus the
buyer can easily pay cash. eBay's fees can mount up quickly and can
cost you a bundle if your item sells for $1000 or more. VeloNews might
be a good option since its readers are aware of and typically revere
Zinn.
 
On Apr 9, 12:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I spent over $5K for the
> bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.
>
> I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> bikes to the "target demographic?"
>
> I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .


(excuse long, etc.):
One way to maximize return can be to part out your bike. Nothing is
certain, but offering a bare frame (fork separate unless it's a
matched part) lets potential buyers choose their desired parts to use
with that frame. Parting out also shows the seatpost and stem (if
applicable) are not corroded into place. BB taken out allows good
close-up photos to show the condition of those threads (if you're
going the "online" sale route with ebay or other). It's a lot easier
to ship "parts", also, and less chance of damage in transit.

Also, you can establish good ebay (or other) feedback by buying and,
more important, selling a few smaller items first, before you sell the
more expensive items. Pay for purchases ASAP, provide exemplary
service to buyers, and don't be afraid to ask for good feedback if
deserved.

Sharp-focused, "really close" closeup photos and clear descriptions
(including the subject line) bring bidders. You can post photos to a
website so you can show detail by using more pictures of smaller areas
of the item to be sold, showing the good and the bad if any.

It's surprising sometimes how good the return can be for what would
seem to be ordinary "bike parts", clean and in good shape, well-
pictured and described. The opposite is true, of course. But (for
example), handlebar/stem combination: if someone wants your handlebars
but not your stem, you lose at least some bidders who don't want to
pay for unusable items, or "extra" shipping costs, even in small
amounts.

If the frame is to be shipped, make sure to charge enough in the
"shipping/handling" area to cover not only the shipping, but enough
pipe insulation (Home Depot, plumbing dept.) to cover the tubes
completely, and use fork/dropout spacers. It's been several years
since I sold a frame but the UPS home pickup service was very handy
and you avoid storefront shippers ripping you off for "oversize" when
your package is not actually oversize. There are "frame only" boxes,
if your large frame will fit in one.

I hope your cycling days aren't over. I know a successful local racer
who was severely injured in a car crash. It took years, but he came
back, and riding a cool old custom steel bike that had been carefully
stored pending the day.

Good luck! --D-y
 
On Apr 9, 4:39 pm, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 9, 12:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > I spent over $5K for the
> > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> (excuse long, etc.):
> One way to maximize return can be to part out your bike. Nothing is
> certain, but offering a bare frame (fork separate unless it's a
> matched part) lets potential buyers choose their desired parts to use
> with that frame. Parting out also shows the seatpost and stem (if
> applicable) are not corroded into place. BB taken out allows good
> close-up photos to show the condition of those threads (if you're
> going the "online" sale route with ebay or other). It's a lot easier
> to ship "parts", also, and less chance of damage in transit.
>
> Also, you can establish good ebay (or other) feedback by buying and,
> more important, selling a few smaller items first, before you sell the
> more expensive items. Pay for purchases ASAP, provide exemplary
> service to buyers, and don't be afraid to ask for good feedback if
> deserved.
>
> Sharp-focused, "really close" closeup photos and clear descriptions
> (including the subject line) bring bidders. You can post photos to a
> website so you can show detail by using more pictures of smaller areas
> of the item to be sold, showing the good and the bad if any.
>
> It's surprising sometimes how good the return can be for what would
> seem to be ordinary "bike parts", clean and in good shape, well-
> pictured and described. The opposite is true, of course. But (for
> example), handlebar/stem combination: if someone wants your handlebars
> but not your stem, you lose at least some bidders who don't want to
> pay for unusable items, or "extra" shipping costs, even in small
> amounts.
>
> If the frame is to be shipped, make sure to charge enough in the
> "shipping/handling" area to cover not only the shipping, but enough
> pipe insulation (Home Depot, plumbing dept.) to cover the tubes
> completely, and use fork/dropout spacers. It's been several years
> since I sold a frame but the UPS home pickup service was very handy
> and you avoid storefront shippers ripping you off for "oversize" when
> your package is not actually oversize. There are "frame only" boxes,
> if your large frame will fit in one.
>
> I hope your cycling days aren't over. I know a successful local racer
> who was severely injured in a car crash. It took years, but he came
> back, and riding a cool old custom steel bike that had been carefully
> stored pending the day.
>
> Good luck! --D-y


I agree 100% on parting it out. Particularly for a bike for well over
average sized riders. You'll (OP) have a much bigger market for the
non large-specific stuff, and you won't hurt your sales chances on the
frame. There are so few huge bikes available, I don't think anyone
looking for a whole bike will be turned away by a frame only. Not to
mention shipping hassles with a large bike. As it is for a frame only
shipping you'll need to custom make a box, but it should at least be
mailable.

I don't mean to stir up potentially depressing thoughts, but if I were
you I'd hang on to the bike. Maybe it'll help motivate youu for a
recovery down the raod and if that is really out of the question,
maybe someday you can give it to somebody special, or who knows what.
Just a thought, but anyone (even a huge guy with limited other
options) who buys a 5G bike in the first place isn't hurting for cash.

Good luck!

Joseph
 
On Apr 9, 2:25 am, "[email protected]"
<[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 9, 7:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Greetings,

>
> > I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> > 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> > Thanks!

>
> > Fitz

>
> I'd go for eBay. But I'd put a pretty high reserve, unless you are in
> a hurry.
>
> Are you sure your cycling is over?
>
> How big are you? I know a guy 6'8" looking for a bike.
>
> Joseph- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I'm 6'6" tall with a 35" inseam.

Fitz
 
On Apr 9, 5:37 am, Gary Young <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Sun, 08 Apr 2007 22:16:20 -0700, Fitz wrote:
> > Greetings,

>
> > I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> > 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> On a hunch, I went to Leonard Zinn's website and sure enough there's a
> "used bikes" link there. Also, I'd talk to Zinn. He may be able to
> recommend your bike to someone for whom a custom bike doesn't work out
> (e.g., someone who needs a bike in a hurry).


Outstanding suggestion! Thanks!
 
On Apr 9, 6:06 am, "Alan" <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 9, 8:37 am, Gary Young <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Sun, 08 Apr 2007 22:16:20 -0700, Fitz wrote:
> > > Greetings,

>
> > > I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> > > 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> > > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> > On a hunch, I went to Leonard Zinn's website and sure enough there's a
> > "used bikes" link there. Also, I'd talk to Zinn. He may be able to
> > recommend your bike to someone for whom a custom bike doesn't work out
> > (e.g., someone who needs a bike in a hurry).

>
> Try the Serotta forum at: http://www.serotta.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=6
>
> Alan- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Thanks, Alan!
 
On Apr 9, 6:57 am, Tim McNamara <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
>
> "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Greetings,

>
> > I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> > 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> Sorry to hear that! Ouch.
>
> > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> You're pretty much going to lose your shorts. Bikes just don't retain
> resale value very well. You might as well resign yourself to that. If
> you get half of what you paid for it, you'll have done well.
>
> I'd try Craigslist first to sell locally and avoid shipping, plus the
> buyer can easily pay cash. eBay's fees can mount up quickly and can
> cost you a bundle if your item sells for $1000 or more. VeloNews might
> be a good option since its readers are aware of and typically revere
> Zinn.


Right-o. Thanks.
 
On Apr 9, 7:39 am, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 9, 12:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > I spent over $5K for the
> > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> (excuse long, etc.):
> One way to maximize return can be to part out your bike. Nothing is
> certain, but offering a bare frame (fork separate unless it's a
> matched part) lets potential buyers choose their desired parts to use
> with that frame. Parting out also shows the seatpost and stem (if
> applicable) are not corroded into place. BB taken out allows good
> close-up photos to show the condition of those threads (if you're
> going the "online" sale route with ebay or other). It's a lot easier
> to ship "parts", also, and less chance of damage in transit.
>
> Also, you can establish good ebay (or other) feedback by buying and,
> more important, selling a few smaller items first, before you sell the
> more expensive items. Pay for purchases ASAP, provide exemplary
> service to buyers, and don't be afraid to ask for good feedback if
> deserved.
>
> Sharp-focused, "really close" closeup photos and clear descriptions
> (including the subject line) bring bidders. You can post photos to a
> website so you can show detail by using more pictures of smaller areas
> of the item to be sold, showing the good and the bad if any.
>
> It's surprising sometimes how good the return can be for what would
> seem to be ordinary "bike parts", clean and in good shape, well-
> pictured and described. The opposite is true, of course. But (for
> example), handlebar/stem combination: if someone wants your handlebars
> but not your stem, you lose at least some bidders who don't want to
> pay for unusable items, or "extra" shipping costs, even in small
> amounts.
>
> If the frame is to be shipped, make sure to charge enough in the
> "shipping/handling" area to cover not only the shipping, but enough
> pipe insulation (Home Depot, plumbing dept.) to cover the tubes
> completely, and use fork/dropout spacers. It's been several years
> since I sold a frame but the UPS home pickup service was very handy
> and you avoid storefront shippers ripping you off for "oversize" when
> your package is not actually oversize. There are "frame only" boxes,
> if your large frame will fit in one.
>
> I hope your cycling days aren't over. I know a successful local racer
> who was severely injured in a car crash. It took years, but he came
> back, and riding a cool old custom steel bike that had been carefully
> stored pending the day.
>
> Good luck! --D-y


Thank you very much for taking the time to respond as you did. Your
points are well-taken and genuinely appreciated.
 
On Apr 9, 9:27 am, "[email protected]"
<[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 9, 4:39 pm, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Apr 9, 12:16 am, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
> > > I spent over $5K for the
> > > bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.

>
> > > I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> > > most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> > > bikes to the "target demographic?"

>
> > > I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> > > but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .

>
> > (excuse long, etc.):
> > One way to maximize return can be to part out your bike. Nothing is
> > certain, but offering a bare frame (fork separate unless it's a
> > matched part) lets potential buyers choose their desired parts to use
> > with that frame. Parting out also shows the seatpost and stem (if
> > applicable) are not corroded into place. BB taken out allows good
> > close-up photos to show the condition of those threads (if you're
> > going the "online" sale route with ebay or other). It's a lot easier
> > to ship "parts", also, and less chance of damage in transit.

>
> > Also, you can establish good ebay (or other) feedback by buying and,
> > more important, selling a few smaller items first, before you sell the
> > more expensive items. Pay for purchases ASAP, provide exemplary
> > service to buyers, and don't be afraid to ask for good feedback if
> > deserved.

>
> > Sharp-focused, "really close" closeup photos and clear descriptions
> > (including the subject line) bring bidders. You can post photos to a
> > website so you can show detail by using more pictures of smaller areas
> > of the item to be sold, showing the good and the bad if any.

>
> > It's surprising sometimes how good the return can be for what would
> > seem to be ordinary "bike parts", clean and in good shape, well-
> > pictured and described. The opposite is true, of course. But (for
> > example), handlebar/stem combination: if someone wants your handlebars
> > but not your stem, you lose at least some bidders who don't want to
> > pay for unusable items, or "extra" shipping costs, even in small
> > amounts.

>
> > If the frame is to be shipped, make sure to charge enough in the
> > "shipping/handling" area to cover not only the shipping, but enough
> > pipe insulation (Home Depot, plumbing dept.) to cover the tubes
> > completely, and use fork/dropout spacers. It's been several years
> > since I sold a frame but the UPS home pickup service was very handy
> > and you avoid storefront shippers ripping you off for "oversize" when
> > your package is not actually oversize. There are "frame only" boxes,
> > if your large frame will fit in one.

>
> > I hope your cycling days aren't over. I know a successful local racer
> > who was severely injured in a car crash. It took years, but he came
> > back, and riding a cool old custom steel bike that had been carefully
> > stored pending the day.

>
> > Good luck! --D-y

>
> I agree 100% on parting it out. Particularly for a bike for well over
> average sized riders. You'll (OP) have a much bigger market for the
> non large-specific stuff, and you won't hurt your sales chances on the
> frame. There are so few huge bikes available, I don't think anyone
> looking for a whole bike will be turned away by a frame only. Not to
> mention shipping hassles with a large bike. As it is for a frame only
> shipping you'll need to custom make a box, but it should at least be
> mailable.
>
> I don't mean to stir up potentially depressing thoughts, but if I were
> you I'd hang on to the bike. Maybe it'll help motivate youu for a
> recovery down the raod and if that is really out of the question,
> maybe someday you can give it to somebody special, or who knows what.
> Just a thought, but anyone (even a huge guy with limited other
> options) who buys a 5G bike in the first place isn't hurting for cash.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Joseph- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Thanks, Joseph. I appreciate your frank thoughts. I'll consider what
you shared.
 
On Apr 8, 10:16 pm, "Fitz" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Greetings,
>
> I have a custom road bike built by The Guru (for those of us over
> 6'5"), Lennard Zinn (www.zinncycles.com). I spent over $5K for the
> bike but a car crash has effectively ended my cycling days.
>
> I would like opinions on how to sell this bike in order to make the
> most money I can for it. What are you folks utilizing to sell your
> bikes to the "target demographic?"
>
> I am realistic to know that I'll never get back what I've invested,
> but I don't want to lose my shorts. . .
>
> Thanks!
>
> Fitz


I'd clean, oil it and put it away in the basement. One day you may be
able to ride it or you will happen to meet someone who will give it a
good home. Also, as time passes, it may actually increase in value. If
you need to get rid of it and have the time, part it out on ebay but
this has many pifalls if you are not familliar with ebay.
 
On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 14:47:18 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

> and a quart of fresh urine for mcnamara!
> thanks tim! drink up!


See Tim, no good deed goes unrewarded here on rbt. Trying to tone down the
hostilities with jim beam, paying a compliment to gene -- both met with
the same response.
 

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