Whats the fastest speed you have done

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Bazza, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Bazza

    Bazza Guest

    What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    it was terrifying.
     
    Tags:


  2. GPLama

    GPLama Guest

    77km/h without going out of my way to find a nicer hill...


    "Bazza" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    > I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    > it was terrifying.
    >
    >
     
  3. powinc

    powinc Guest

    I've just got a new road bike (a Cannondale) and I've hit 68km/h on i
    and needed to hit the brakes, because I was ****ting myself just
    little bit

    I guess it will take a bit of time to be accustomed to speeds that high

    powin

    ps: What happens if you have a tyre blow out at high speed. I guess i
    would be very difficult to control if a front tyre blew and not s
    bad if the back tyre went?


    -
     
  4. gaza

    gaza Guest

    81kph on my MTB.
    I'm looking for a safer and bigger hill. I was told to try Bunya Mountain.
    I was a bit dissapointed the other month when I tried the Bruxner Hwy (comes
    down from the tablelands between New England Hwy and Pacific Hwy)
    The best I could get was 77kph but that was with 2 rear panniers and a
    handlebar bag.
    "powinc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:J_E%[email protected]
    > I've just got a new road bike (a Cannondale) and I've hit 68km/h on it
    > and needed to hit the brakes, because I was ****ting myself just a
    > little bit.
    >
    > I guess it will take a bit of time to be accustomed to speeds that high.
    >
    > powinc
    >
    > ps: What happens if you have a tyre blow out at high speed. I guess it
    > would be very difficult to control if a front tyre blew and not so
    > bad if the back tyre went??
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    >
     
  5. On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:15:06 +1000, Bazza wrote:

    > What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    > I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    > it was terrifying.


    89 down Waverley Rd at Wheelers Hill. next fastest was about 78 down the
    east side of Toowonga Gap during the Alpine Challenge, but that's kind of
    twisty so I had to keep braking.

    --
    phillip brown
     
  6. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    Bazza wrote:

    > What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    > I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    > it was terrifying.


    96kph coming back down Fitz's Hill in the Fitz's Challenge. A friend who
    outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same hill that day.

    Nick
     
  7. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "Nick Payne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bazza wrote:
    >
    > > What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    > > I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must

    say,
    > > it was terrifying.

    >
    > 96kph coming back down Fitz's Hill in the Fitz's Challenge. A friend who
    > outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same hill that day.
    >

    96, same hill, Canberra Milk Race one year.

    [this thread has come up multiple times before]

    Jeff
     
  8. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "powinc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:J_E%[email protected]
    > I've just got a new road bike (a Cannondale) and I've hit 68km/h on it
    > and needed to hit the brakes, because I was ****ting myself just a
    > little bit.
    >
    > I guess it will take a bit of time to be accustomed to speeds that high.


    For me, it all depends on how clear it is up ahead. If I can
    see a long straight line in front of me - flat out!
    If it's twisty, I'm much more cautious about my speed.

    We hit 79.something kph on the way down from the
    1in20 ride last Wednesday. I think my max is 84kph
    coming down the Black Spur. I once had 92kph as
    the max, but after trying to better it, I'm pretty sure
    now that it was an error with my Vetta computer.

    > ps: What happens if you have a tyre blow out at high speed. I guess it
    > would be very difficult to control if a front tyre blew and not so
    > bad if the back tyre went??


    I've had front and rear blowouts, but I think they
    were all under 50kph. All of them were just a
    matter of wobbling to a fairly controlled stop,
    followed by lots of really colourful language
    because now I had to walk too far to home/work.
    I think it depends on how exactly the blowout
    happens. The front wheel one was a case of the
    brake pad wearing through the tyre causing it to
    pop. Front end turned rapidly into a shaky mess
    but not crazy enough that I couldn't just brake and
    stop. Bloody tram driver wouldn't pick me up :(

    hippy
     
  9. HUMBUG

    HUMBUG Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 10:30:01 GMT, powinc <[email protected]> Wrote :
    > I've just got a new road bike (a Cannondale) and I've hit 68km/h on it
    > and needed to hit the brakes, because I was ****ting myself just a
    > little bit.


    The "secret" is to put the consequences of disaster out of your mind and
    concentrate on going faster. Don't worry about brakes - they only slow
    you down...:)

    >
    > I guess it will take a bit of time to be accustomed to speeds that high.


    A mate of mine reckons that if you've got things under control you're not
    going fast enough. I reckon he's WRONG. Another thing he seems to say
    a lot is that it seemed like a good idea at the time...:)

    >
    > powinc
    >
    > ps: What happens if you have a tyre blow out at high speed. I guess it
    > would be very difficult to control if a front tyre blew and not so
    > bad if the back tyre went??


    I've broken 100 a few times on a loaded touring bike coming down from
    Bradleys Gap towards Corryong (STEEP and straight). At that speed a
    suddenly flat tyre would quite probably give you a once in a lifetime
    chance to demonstrate that the human body doesn't bounce well and, against
    a bitumen road surface, has quite a high coefficient of friction.
    ie. You die with lotsa broken bits and even more missing skin. Do try
    not to think about it...:)


    --

    Humbug
     
  10. Matt

    Matt Guest

    Nick Payne wrote:
    >
    > A friend who
    > outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same hill that day.


    Second or third time someone has said something like that... you don't
    accelerate down a hill any faster or have a higher top speed if you
    weight more.

    In fact you'd probably be slower on both counts if you weighed more as
    you'd likely have more frontal area, which equals more wind resistence.
     
  11. fred

    fred Guest

    Bazza wrote:
    > What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    > I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    > it was terrifying.
    >
    >

    Haven't we done this thread a whole lotta times before?

    Anyway.

    84.9 kph down the big hill with a tail wind on the Great Ocean Road,
    Victoria, Australia, Jan 1996.

    Equipment used: otherwise stock 1990 GT Karakoram MTB, but with Cinelli
    Eubios 44cm drops and Shimmy 600 bar-end shifters; heavy home-made
    rack-top bag on alu Korean-made (many fine things are made in Korea, but
    that's another story) generic rear rack. Speed recorded by v beaten-up
    Cateye "Astrale" cycle 'poot. Li'l sis on her road bike, who I was
    touring with, witnessed this. She said she only hit 70 kph or so. I
    don't think downhill speeds justifies riding a heavy bike.

    I claim this as a World Record in the "Bicycle/Bicycle Idiots/Mountain
    Bikes retrofitted with drop-bars" class.

    And so on.

    Ooops. Meant to be top speed on your road bike. My road bike is in
    several places (frame: lower left storage space, wheels: upper right
    storage space, running gear: attached in hybridised form to
    - commuter bike,
    - shopping bike,
    - various boxes of bike bits...

    Well... s... Yeah...

    Anyway,

    xxx

    pppppppp
     
  12. "Matt" wrote:

    > Nick Payne wrote:
    > >
    > > A friend who outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same
    > > hill that day.


    > Second or third time someone has said something like that...
    > you don't accelerate down a hill any faster or have a higher
    > top speed if you weight more.
    >
    > In fact you'd probably be slower on both counts if you weighed
    > more as you'd likely have more frontal area, which equals more
    > wind resistence.


    As a heavy bloke, I can assure you that we've got the advantage
    downhill. Even without slipstreaming, I've got to brake to avoid
    overtaking other cyclists.

    Certainly, heavier individuals have greater surface area. But
    that is proportionally less that the increased mass. Surface
    area increases less than volume does - it's simple geometry.

    That trick with the volume:surface area ratio is why animals in
    cold climates are usually larger than those in warm ones (samples
    from the same species).

    John
     
  13. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "John Henderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Matt" wrote:
    >
    > > Nick Payne wrote:
    > > >
    > > > A friend who outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same
    > > > hill that day.

    >
    > > Second or third time someone has said something like that...
    > > you don't accelerate down a hill any faster or have a higher
    > > top speed if you weight more.
    > >
    > > In fact you'd probably be slower on both counts if you weighed
    > > more as you'd likely have more frontal area, which equals more
    > > wind resistence.

    >
    > As a heavy bloke, I can assure you that we've got the advantage
    > downhill. Even without slipstreaming, I've got to brake to avoid
    > overtaking other cyclists.
    >

    Maybe you have better technique/position than them?

    > Certainly, heavier individuals have greater surface area. But
    > that is proportionally less that the increased mass. Surface
    > area increases less than volume does - it's simple geometry.
    >

    The increased mass shouldn't matter - what about Galileo's experiments?

    Jeff
     
  14. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "Jeff Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "John Henderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]


    > > Certainly, heavier individuals have greater surface area. But
    > > that is proportionally less that the increased mass. Surface
    > > area increases less than volume does - it's simple geometry.
    > >

    > The increased mass shouldn't matter - what about Galileo's experiments?
    >

    (replying to own post)

    Actually John I'll give you this one, as cycling is not the same as free
    falling in a vacuum ;-) Applying the following cycling descending equation:

    s = sqrt [-giM/kaA]

    s=terminal velocity
    g=gravitational constant
    i = grade of the road
    M = mass of cyclist
    ka = air resistance coefficient
    A = frontal surface area of cyclist + bike

    So taking out all the constants, terminal velocity is proportional to M/A,
    and as you said heavier cyclists have proportionately more M than A so they
    should go faster!

    Jeff (chastising self. never would have thought I did 2nd year physics at
    uni)
     
  15. On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:15:06 +1000, "Bazza" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    >I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    >it was terrifying.


    72 kph on a single speed 28" Massey, coming down Baker St towards Luck
    St. I chickened out as the T-intersection got closer. Mind you, the
    pedal activated friction brakes off the back wheel have a bad tendency
    to lock up under thos circumstances.


    ---
    Cheers

    PeterC

    [Rushing headlong: out of control - and there ain't no stopping]
    [and there's nothing you can do about it at all]
     
  16. kingsley

    kingsley Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 10:30:01 +0000, powinc wrote:

    > ps: What happens if you have a tyre blow out at high speed. I guess it
    > would be very difficult to control if a front tyre blew and not so
    > bad if the back tyre went??


    Has anyone ever had an actual blowout?

    I have, but that was after inflating my tyres with a petrol-station
    pump[1]. They did feel a bit hard, and would take pressure to 85psi,
    so when they went off like a gunshot 100m later, it was obvious
    user-error on the pump was the cause.

    Interestingly, the tyre was mostly ok, but the tube had a 30cm
    gash in it. I replaced the tube, but the tyre had a bit of a
    5cm bulge on one side. Having no spare tyre, I rode on it for another
    20km or so until I passed a shop. Once I had a spare tyre, I kept using
    the lumpy tyre for another hundred km or so... another bulge developed
    just up from the first, and then the next day (was touring) a third bump
    formed. At this point we swapped over the tyre for the spare.

    -kt

    [1] Inflating presta tubes with a schrader valve adapter. I think
    the meter on the pump was measuring the pressure inside the valve
    adapter, not the tube.

    --
    Kingsley Turner,
    (mailto: [email protected])
    http://MadDogsBreakfast.com/ABFAQ - news:aus.bicycle Frequenly Asked Questions
     
  17. apologies

    apologies Guest

    "Bazza" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What is your fastest speed you have done on ya road bike.
    >I've hit 54kmh on my MTB , but that was down a steep hill, and I must say,
    >it was terrifying.
    >


    77 Down Burmingham Rd. Mt. Evelyn on and old steel MTB no suspension
    would have been 80 if I hadn't tested the brakes to make sure I'd stop
    at the bottom before Swansea rd.


    May all your cycling adventures be with a tailwind,

    Neil.
     
  18. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "John Henderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Matt" wrote:
    >
    > > Nick Payne wrote:
    > > >
    > > > A friend who outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same
    > > > hill that day.

    >
    > > Second or third time someone has said something like that...
    > > you don't accelerate down a hill any faster or have a higher
    > > top speed if you weight more.
    > >
    > > In fact you'd probably be slower on both counts if you weighed
    > > more as you'd likely have more frontal area, which equals more
    > > wind resistence.

    >
    > As a heavy bloke, I can assure you that we've got the advantage
    > downhill. Even without slipstreaming, I've got to brake to avoid
    > overtaking other cyclists.


    Yeah, I notice that I always catch the ligher riders
    when rolling down hills... maybe I just put in an
    extra pedal stroke or two at the top? :)

    hippy
     
  19. hippy

    hippy Guest

    "Jeff Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:403fa63b$0$311
    > So taking out all the constants, terminal velocity is proportional to M/A,
    > and as you said heavier cyclists have proportionately more M than A so

    they
    > should go faster!


    Thanks for that Jeff.. I'm glad I wasn't "imagining" going
    faster than the others!

    hippy
     
  20. Ritch

    Ritch Guest

    Matt <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Nick Payne wrote:
    > >
    > > A friend who
    > > outweighs me by about 20kg did 104 down the same hill that day.

    >
    > Second or third time someone has said something like that... you don't
    > accelerate down a hill any faster or have a higher top speed if you
    > weight more.
    >
    > In fact you'd probably be slower on both counts if you weighed more as
    > you'd likely have more frontal area, which equals more wind resistence.


    If the frontal area is the same, then the heavier rider will have a
    higher terminal velocity. Go to www.analyticcycling.com and try some
    different numbers in the Speed given Power page.

    Ritch

    PS. 85.1 down F'tree Gully Road east of Jells Road...
     
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