What's with these new threadless Presta valve stems?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by stevecoh1, Oct 16, 2005.

  1. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    I've used both types, and don't prefer either. I currently have the screw on type, and the way I have my cables routed the screw is almost impossible to get at. It would be the same amount of trouble to cut and replace cable ties. But it doesn't matter much because in the three years I've owned the computer I've moved it exactly once. I'm sure the industry has done a lot more market research than you give them credit for. Most screw on mounts won't work with the new shaped carbon bars that are becoming popular. The manufacturers are chosing to make a product that will work for everyone. Their research may also have indicated that a larger percentage of cyclists have more important things to think about than how their computers are mounted.
     


  2. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I have a new pump (Park Home Mechanic), and it worked fine on the threadless valves until I had to use it on a threaded valve stem. I prefer the threadless valves, but now I need to hold the pump head on (a velcro strap will work fine). I suppose there are better pumps around that won't have this problem. My pump is pretty new, so I'm a bit dissapointed. RE: cyclocomputers, I took a few years off from the sport and was a surprised to find that all the old clamps and screws used to mount the computer to the bike were replaced by rubber bands, and electrical ties. I must say though, that it's nice to not need any tools to mount my cadence or speed sensors, and after a few years everything has held up nicely. I do agree that with all the different shapes and sizes the newer mounting kits work much better. I use a Polar S725, and the ties that hold the handlebar mount, speed and cadence sensors work fine. the ties do stretch a bit, so do not cut so much off that you can't tighten it when needed.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    "Conspiracy" as it was used was meant to be sarcastic, not an insinuation that someone believed there was an actual conspiracy. And FWIW, the idea that in short order you'll have no choice in product matters is, well, a bit paranoid and a lot ridiculous. When people stop buying a product they are exercising their most powerful choice.

    Mounts w/ zip ties or rubber bands are in no way a cheapening of a product. They're pretty damned efficient and strong. And as someone else mentioned, try to find a screw and clamp mount that will fit the wide variety of handlebars, forks, whatever these days. Manufacturers will try to make their product usable for as many people as possible.

    Even if you don't like zip ties and rubber bands, there are still plenty of screw and clamp mounts out there. If you can't find them, then that's your problem. It doesn't take much to go to the LBS or to call a company or send an email. There is absolutely no way that a company can anticipate every bit of info that a customer will want.

    And so what if you have to reposition a sensor now and again? It's not like it's time consuming or difficult. It's no more difficult that any regular maintenance that has to be done on a bike.

    Sounds like you might be a picky shopper. That's fine, but you can't expect that a manufacturer is gonna cater to your more demanding needs.
     
  4. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    Not to mention, that those old screw and clamp styles dry out and crack after a few years of use. Once that happens you're basically SOL or you have to find a mount kit. The ties and rubber bands can be found at any hardware store. Plus the companies give you plenty of extras. Polar is pretty good about it.
     
  5. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    Sorry, but I've seen it again and again. Here's another one: Taillights that you can screw onto the back of a rear rack. Oh yeah, you can find them, I know. But you have to look pretty hard. You have to hit the specialty web sites or ask your local bike shop to order one. The "standard" is now the seatpost mount or the clip that clips onto a backpack. (And again some models have a clip that's so bad, the item will not stay attached. I've let these on the ground where they fell once too often. Others' clips are better.) After being rearended and having my leg broken while using one of the cheaper flashers, I AM a litte paranoid about having a strong taillight. I want one I can attach and have it stay attached. And I've been willing to pay a premium price to buy something that was once common. Oh well.

    But I still say people are not CHOOSING to buy cable-tie mount cyclocomputers or taillights with crappy mounting clips. They're buying the computer becuase of the electronic feature-set or because it looks cool. And they're living with whatever mounting hardware comes with it. They're buying the light because of look or brightness. And, for the most part, living with the mounting hardware that comes with it.

    If you want to prove to me that people are CHOOSING these items, then you ought to be able to show me the advertising campaign based on mounting hardware that drove the competition from the market. I don't think you can. (I'll settle for boxtop or catalog copy that says "Fastens with cable-ties instead of those old-fashioned screws") Rather, I think because most people DON'T care about mounting hardware, it's an area where the manufacturers can cut costs with impunity. Doesn't mean they AREN'T cheapening the product.

    Would it surprise anyone to learn that I'm a former machinist?
     
  6. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Well, why do we have to prove anything to you? You've have definitely not proven anything w.r.t. to your view. In fact, you can hold to your view quite easily because there is nothing about it that can be proven or disproven. So what's the point? You feel cheated....you've made that clear.

    And who really cares that you were a machinist? Does it give you more credibility than a teacher? Bus driver? Cashier at a grociery store? Engineer? Nope, didn't think so.
     
  8. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    Interesting. Mirrors my experience. So is the rule of thumb this: once used on a threaded valve stem, a pump will no longer work well on threadless valve stems? Or are there better pumps which can be switched back and forth without problem?
     
  9. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    You don't have to prove anything, but why keep arguing then?

    Several people have made the assertion that because people buy product X which has feature Y, this proves they must have wanted feature Y. This has been reiterated several times in this thread and it ain't necessarily so.

    Let's try another example. If every new car has a cigarette lighter (probably no longer true, but it once was), is it true that everyone who bought a car wanted a cigarette lighter with his car? Not unless he was offered a choice of the same car without the lighter at a cost reduced by the lighter's value. Your argument is essentially that by choosing to buy such a car, I must have wanted that cigarette lighter.


    You misunderstand my point. My point was not that all must bow down to my machinist's experience. Rather it was - perhaps my experience as a machinist has made me value my idea of a well-crafted mounting bracket to an extent that puts me out of step with 99.9% of consumers. I may in fact be valuing durability and configurability far beyond what they're really worth. I was explaining my point of view, not trying to beat you down.
     
  10. Induray

    Induray New Member

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    Look at other threads about pumps and valves. I recently encountered one where the originator was complaining of how hard was to remove the pump nozzle from the valve. I have a Silca pump and if you a threaded valve, believe me, it takes Hulk to remove the nozzle fm the threaded valve. As a matter of fact, if you do it several times, the tension force you will cause the valve to separate fm the tube! In this case a non-threaded valve would be a better option, although I have never encountered a non-threaded extra long valve at any of the catalogs. (Are they cheaper?)
     
  11. Induray

    Induray New Member

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    Most of the cyclocomputer manufacturer's website do provide installation procedure manuals via .pdf format. The manuals details how the mount is designed. When I purchased my last computer, I went to each website (CATEYE, VETTA, VDO etc.)and downloaded the manuals for each appropritate comp that was on my wishlist. I learned how they are installed, and its Interface logic, and fm there I made my decision. It can be done.
     
  12. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    Thanks, that's a good suggestion.
     
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