What's your highest cycling speed on flat?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by rc5, Jul 5, 2004.

  1. rc5

    rc5 Guest

    I made 56.1km/h on my walmart 26" 18 speed MTB today, 48 X 17(couldn't
    shift to 15 for some weird problem), for probably 10-20 seconds.

    After some simple calculation, I figured that I was pedaling at 160
    rpm.
     
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  2. victor

    victor Guest

    My max speed on a downhill was 53.9 kph. There's a curve in the hill that
    slows me down...How do you figue rpm?

    victor

    "rc5" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I made 56.1km/h on my walmart 26" 18 speed MTB today, 48 X 17(couldn't
    > shift to 15 for some weird problem), for probably 10-20 seconds.
    >
    > After some simple calculation, I figured that I was pedaling at 160
    > rpm.
     
  3. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "victor" wrote:(clip)...How do you figue rpm?
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Arithmetic. Measure your wheel diameter.* Multiply by pi to get
    circumference. Divide into 5280 (feet per mile) to get wheel RPM. Divide
    by your gear ratio (chainring teeth/cog teeth.

    *Get this in feet. Measure in inches and divide by 12, or cm and divide by
    30.48)
     
  4. victor

    victor Guest

    I think it would be a lot easier to get a computer with cadence to monitor
    my rpm while riding.

    victor

    "rc5" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I made 56.1km/h on my walmart 26" 18 speed MTB today, 48 X 17(couldn't
    > shift to 15 for some weird problem), for probably 10-20 seconds.
    >
    > After some simple calculation, I figured that I was pedaling at 160
    > rpm.
     
  5. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Leo Lichtman" wrote:
    Some really incorrect stuff. Highly embarrassed. Need to learn to wait for
    the coffee to kick in before posting.

    Skipping the derivation this time,
    MPH times 336, divided by wheel diameter in inches, times number of cog
    teeth, divided by number of chainring teeth
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (rc5) wrote:

    > I made 56.1km/h on my walmart 26" 18 speed MTB today, 48 X 17(couldn't
    > shift to 15 for some weird problem), for probably 10-20 seconds.
    >
    > After some simple calculation, I figured that I was pedaling at 160
    > rpm.


    Assuming that's not a troll, that's darned near amazing. I'm really
    happy breaking 50 km/h in a sprint on my fast bike, though I did manage
    55 yesterday.

    Time to start racing,

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com
    President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  7. Palookabutt

    Palookabutt Guest

    > Assuming that's not a troll, that's darned near amazing. I'm really
    > happy breaking 50 km/h in a sprint on my fast bike, though I did manage
    > 55 yesterday.


    I believe in Arnie Baker's book "Smart Cycling" he mentions that some
    track racers get up to 250 RPM, and lists 160-165 RPM as an achievable
    goal after two years of speed work. I've managed 140-145 RPM on my
    wind trainer doing one of Baker's workouts, but I've never really
    spent much time on leg speed.

    My highest speed on a flat - that I remember - was only about 32 MPH
    (~52 kph) on my mountain bike, huffing to make a green light. The
    road is really more of a false flat (slightly downhill in the
    direction I was going).
     
  8. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 6 Jul 2004 09:46:57 -0700, [email protected] (Palookabutt)
    wrote:

    >> Assuming that's not a troll, that's darned near amazing. I'm really
    >> happy breaking 50 km/h in a sprint on my fast bike, though I did manage
    >> 55 yesterday.

    >
    >I believe in Arnie Baker's book "Smart Cycling" he mentions that some
    >track racers get up to 250 RPM, and lists 160-165 RPM as an achievable
    >goal after two years of speed work. I've managed 140-145 RPM on my
    >wind trainer doing one of Baker's workouts, but I've never really
    >spent much time on leg speed.
    >
    >My highest speed on a flat - that I remember - was only about 32 MPH
    >(~52 kph) on my mountain bike, huffing to make a green light. The
    >road is really more of a false flat (slightly downhill in the
    >direction I was going).


    Several times I've gotten well into the 40s (mph) on the flats, each
    time while drafting a dump truck. ;-)

    As I recall I was pretty much spun out in 52/12.


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  9. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 14:47:16 GMT, "victor" <vcarnuccio
    @mindspring.com> wrote:
    >My max speed on a downhill was 53.9 kph. There's a curve in the hill that
    >slows me down...How do you figue rpm?


    Get a computer that measures it for you, or go to
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears
    and put in your info. You can then see charts of mph or kph at
    various RPMs. Find your speed at the same gear combination as you
    were in, and see your RPM.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  10. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 6 Jul 2004 09:46:57 -0700, [email protected] (Palookabutt)
    wrote:
    >I believe in Arnie Baker's book "Smart Cycling" he mentions that some
    >track racers get up to 250 RPM, and lists 160-165 RPM as an achievable
    >goal after two years of speed work.


    Why achieve that goal? Planning to compete in a cadence competition?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 06 Jul 2004 17:45:56 GMT,
    <[email protected]>, John Everett
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Several times I've gotten well into the 40s (mph) on the flats, each
    >time while drafting a dump truck. ;-)


    I quit drafting dump trucks after I tucked in behind one towing a pup.
    --
    zk
     
  12. Neil Cherry

    Neil Cherry Guest

    On 5 Jul 2004 07:09:12 -0700, rc5 wrote:
    > I made 56.1km/h on my walmart 26" 18 speed MTB today, 48 X 17(couldn't
    > shift to 15 for some weird problem), for probably 10-20 seconds.


    I've only done this once and that was 38.3 mph (I was riding in
    traffic and needed to go very fast). I can maintain 36 mph for several
    hundred feet. I've done this in front of a police car once or twice so
    I could make a legal left (US).

    > After some simple calculation, I figured that I was pedaling at 160
    > rpm.


    At 38+ mph I'm at about 120 rpm for a 53x12 & 700C. I can do up to 182
    but it's really difficult to stay seated at that point. I really need
    to put more work into spinning but I've been spending a lot of time
    working on climbing. I live in the flat lands so it's difficult.

    --
    Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry [email protected]
    http://home.comcast.net/~ncherry/ (Text only)
    http://linuxha.sourceforge.net/ (SourceForge)
    http://hcs.sourceforge.net/ (HCS II)
     
  13. Bruce Frech

    Bruce Frech Guest

    I drafted a truck down a hill at 60mph, and followed him for another mile on
    the flats at the same speed.

    In a 52-13 that's about 180 rpm.

    Bruce
     
  14. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Bruce Frech wrote:
    > I drafted a truck down a hill at 60mph, and followed him for another
    > mile on the flats at the same speed.
    >
    > In a 52-13 that's about 180 rpm.


    Wasn't that in a movie?

    Bill "or you dreamed it" S.
     
  15. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 04:52:23 GMT, "S o r n i"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Bruce Frech wrote:
    >> I drafted a truck down a hill at 60mph, and followed him for another
    >> mile on the flats at the same speed.
    >>
    >> In a 52-13 that's about 180 rpm.

    >
    >Wasn't that in a movie?


    Sort of. He wasn't in his 52-13, he was on the small chainring. ;-)


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  16. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    John Everett wrote:
    > On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 04:52:23 GMT, "S o r n i"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Bruce Frech wrote:
    >>> I drafted a truck down a hill at 60mph, and followed him for another
    >>> mile on the flats at the same speed.
    >>>
    >>> In a 52-13 that's about 180 rpm.

    >>
    >> Wasn't that in a movie?

    >
    > Sort of. He wasn't in his 52-13, he was on the small chainring. ;-)


    Right. Sort of made a hamster look like it's on Valium, eh?

    Bill "director should've been shot for that shot" S.
     
  17. Palookabutt

    Palookabutt Guest

    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 6 Jul 2004 09:46:57 -0700, [email protected] (Palookabutt)
    > wrote:
    > >I believe in Arnie Baker's book "Smart Cycling" he mentions that some
    > >track racers get up to 250 RPM, and lists 160-165 RPM as an achievable
    > >goal after two years of speed work.

    >
    > Why achieve that goal? Planning to compete in a cadence competition?


    I think Arnie was addressing this advice to track racers. I believe
    track bikes have only one gear, so in a way it really is a "cadence
    competition".

    Sprinters might also want to hit a high cadence.
     
  18. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 7 Jul 2004 13:13:04 -0700, [email protected] (Palookabutt)
    wrote:
    >Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> >track racers get up to 250 RPM, and lists 160-165 RPM as an achievable

    >> Why achieve that goal? Planning to compete in a cadence competition?

    >
    >I think Arnie was addressing this advice to track racers. I believe


    OIC. That makes more sense.

    The other day, I decided to see what kind of cadence I could hit
    while still producing power, and was utterly shocked to pedal 150
    rpm and continue to accelerate. It's not something I'd want to do,
    and I'm pretty sure I produce more power at lower rpm, but my legs
    went that fast, and reasonably smoothly too.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  19. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I quit drafting dump trucks after I tucked in behind one towing a pup.


    By which you mean what? And were there dire consequences for you?

    Chalo Colina
    "hope he didn't mean a dog"
     
  20. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I quit drafting dump trucks after I tucked in behind one towing a pup.


    By which you mean what? And were there dire consequences for you?

    Chalo Colina
    "hope he didn't mean a dog"
     
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