Wheel bearing locknut

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Jon Schneider, Mar 14, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. How does one tighten up the wheel bearing locknut without the cones moving ? Is it really necessary
    to clamp both the shaft and the cone to stop relative movement ? And if so what's a nice way of
    clamping the shaft ? A tool that uses the slot in the shaft ?

    I'm sure I used to be able to do this in a few minutes. Maybe I've lost my touch or it has been
    a long day.

    Jon
     
    Tags:


  2. Jon Schneider wrote:
    >
    > How does one tighten up the wheel bearing locknut without the cones moving ? Is it really
    > necessary to clamp both the shaft and the cone to stop relative movement ? And if so what's a nice
    > way of clamping the shaft ? A tool that uses the slot in the shaft ?
    >
    > I'm sure I used to be able to do this in a few minutes. Maybe I've lost my touch or it has been a
    > long day.
    >
    > Jon

    www.m-gineering.nl/tipsoldg.htm
    --
    Marten
     
  3. Ntlworld

    Ntlworld Guest

    > www.m-gineering.nl/tipsoldg.htm

    Skewer rod ? Centering ring ?

    I think this article refers to something a lot more fancy than what I have !

    Jon
     
  4. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Fri, 14 Mar 2003 23:26:06 +0100, M-Gineering import & framebouw <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jon Schneider wrote:
    >>
    >> How does one tighten up the wheel bearing locknut without the cones moving ? Is it really
    >> necessary to clamp both the shaft and the cone to stop relative movement ? And if so what's a
    >> nice way of clamping the shaft ? A tool that uses the slot in the shaft ?
    >>
    >> I'm sure I used to be able to do this in a few minutes. Maybe I've lost my touch or it has been a
    >> long day.
    >>
    >> Jon
    >
    >www.m-gineering.nl/tipsoldg.htm

    Some nice tips but not the answer to the question. What I do is set the cone fairly tight against
    the bearings and then snug up the locknut, but not too tight. Then holding the shaft assembly with a
    cone wrench on the already tightened side (the side I didn't disassemble, either cone or locknut) I
    back out the other cone. The locknut will move with it if not tightened too much. Move a little at a
    time and check for bearing feel. When it "feels right" I tighten the cone and locknut against each
    other. There may be some slight movement of the cone relative to the shaft; but I hand-wave this
    away, assuming it will be compensated for when the skewer is tightened. :)

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  5. On Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:34 +0000 (GMT Standard Time), contributor Jon Schneider had scribed:
    > Skewer ?
    >
    > Is this some way of building a kebab into the rear wheel ?
    >

    A quick release thingy which enables a wheel to be attached to a barbecue when it isn't being used
    to clamp the wheel between the folks (front) or stays (rear) of a bicycle.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...