Wheel building questions

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dan Lissit, Jan 22, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Dan Lissit

    Dan Lissit Guest

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm converting an 80's road bike (Trek 460) to fixed gear. Since the original rear hub is a
    Helicomatic (= can't screw on a cog) I am rebuilding it with a Suzue standard flip-flop. This will
    be my first try at building a wheel. The original rim is a Matrix Strada, black anodyzed. I have two
    questions: 1) the eyelets on the spoke holes are rusted on the exterior, although otherwise the rim
    is in good shape. Will it be alright if I just remove the rust, or am I better off replacing the
    rim? 2) What is the preferred lacing pattern, if any, for a fixed gear wheel?

    Thanks for your help. Dan
     
    Tags:


  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    I don't think the rust is a big deal. It will just make adjusting the rim a little difficult because
    the nipple will tend to bind against the rust and be a bit notchy. If you remove the rust, that
    should be quite adequate. I assume this is a bit of a clunker bike, and if that's the case, with an
    otherwise fine rim, I wouldn't worry about that rust at all. Lube the nipples with some heavy oil
    while building, just a tad, not too much.

    I almost always prefer 3x for any wheel. I would advise the same here. You certainly can't do
    radial. 3x builds a nice durable wheel and I've had plenty of great wheels using this pattern.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
    --
    Scott Anderson

    "Dan Lissit" <[email protected]yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > I'm converting an 80's road bike (Trek 460) to fixed gear. Since the original rear hub is a
    > Helicomatic (= can't screw on a cog) I am rebuilding it with a Suzue standard flip-flop. This will
    > be my first try at building a wheel. The original rim is a Matrix Strada, black anodyzed. I have
    > two questions: 1) the eyelets on the spoke holes are rusted on the exterior, although otherwise
    > the rim is in good shape. Will it be alright if I just remove the rust, or am I better off
    > replacing the rim? 2) What is the preferred lacing pattern, if any, for a fixed gear wheel?
    >
    > Thanks for your help. Dan
     
  3. Jay Hill

    Jay Hill Guest

  4. Almost Fast

    Almost Fast Guest

    [email protected] (Dan Lissit) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > 1) the eyelets on the spoke holes are rusted on the exterior, although otherwise the rim is in
    > good shape. Will it be alright if I just remove the rust, or am I better off replacing the rim?

    Unless the eyelets have structurally failed, you don't even need to remove the rust. Just build the
    wheel (lube nipple-eyelet interface as usual).

    > 2) What is the preferred lacing pattern, if any, for a fixed gear wheel?

    Same as any wheel that transmits torque through the hub: crossed. Usually 3x or 4x.
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Dan Lissit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > I'm converting an 80's road bike (Trek 460) to fixed gear. Since the original rear hub is a
    > Helicomatic (= can't screw on a cog) I am rebuilding it with a Suzue standard flip-flop. This will
    > be my first try at building a wheel. The original rim is a Matrix Strada, black anodyzed. I have
    > two questions: 1) the eyelets on the spoke holes are rusted on the exterior, although otherwise
    > the rim is in good shape. Will it be alright if I just remove the rust, or am I better off
    > replacing the rim? 2) What is the preferred lacing pattern, if any, for a fixed gear wheel?

    The rust doesn't hurt anything but the look. If you wire brush them and smear oil as you lubricate
    the nipples it wil be OK. Detailing them with a metallic silver paint pen is a possibility if your
    time is taken out of the discussion. Depending on your year, the red label Rigida 13-19 is lacking
    the lip that got added to the blue label 13-20 rim. This is a consideration if you intend to use
    folding (Kevlar bead) tires.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  6. Dan Lissit

    Dan Lissit Guest

    Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]hill.org>...
    > Dan Lissit wrote:
    > > Hi Everyone,
    > >
    > > This will be my first
    > > try at building a wheel.
    >
    > Have you read Sheldon Brown's procedure? http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

    Yes, it's because of his explanation that I'm feeling confident to give it a try. He mentioned
    reversing the direction out from the flange on a FW, but I wasn't sure if there were any other
    particular tricks specific to FW that I should know.

    To Scott-- yes, I suppose this is going to be a beater, but it still hurt to hear it: I was
    damn proud of that bike when I got it back in high school! Thanks, though, for the reassurance
    on the rims. Dan
     
  7. Harris

    Harris Guest

    A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Depending on your year, the red label Rigida 13-19 is lacking the lip that got added to the blue
    > label 13-20 rim. This is a consideration if you intend to use folding (Kevlar bead) tires.

    Do you mean the hook for the bead? I have a couple of red label Rigida 13-19s (one has an oval
    label, the other is a rectangle) that I have been using with Kevlar bead tires. Now you've got me
    worried! :->

    Art Harris
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...