Wheel doesn't fit in dropout

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by cloudhead, May 9, 2011.

  1. cloudhead

    cloudhead New Member

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    Hello,

    I scored a pretty cool used Ciöcc frame (COM 12.5 steel), and have enough components around to tinker up something to ride, hopefully, as a fast commuter. But the rear wheel doesn't fit in the derailleur-side dropout, as seen in the photo. Is this something fixable, or has this frame already seen it's day? It fits fine on the other side. I'm a bit of a newbie to bike repair, with the intention of this bike teaching me, so any info is greatly appreciated.

    [​IMG]


    Thanks,

    Court
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    If you look at the paint at approximately the 5 o'clock position on the dropout you can see cracking. Probably the derailer hanger has been bent slightly forward w/o an axle in the dropout, pinching the dropout together a bit.
    Steel is reputably forgiving, so probably it's possible to bend it back - but if it was me I'd probably take a file to the dropout and just widen it a tad instead until the axle settles properly.
     
  3. ProdigalCyclist

    ProdigalCyclist New Member

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    To be more specific... The cracking that debac is talking about is cracking in the PAINT... not the steel. At least that's what I see. And he's right, it can probably be bent back in to shape. But if you don't know what you're doing take it to a local bike shop and have them look at it.

    You don't want to bend it wrong or you could twist the derail hanger and cause problems with the shifting. You also don't want to bend it too much and then have to bend it again, because while steel is pretty forgiving, there will come a point where it will start to fatigue. You could also file the inside of the drop out like he suggested as well but I say that without knowing how much it's bent, and without knowing if the derail hanger is straight right now or not.

    All in all... I don't think this is anything too terribly major. My suggestion would be to take it to a GOOD bike shop. One with guys that know what they're talking about... not one that has a bunch of teenage "bike assemblers" they call mechanics. A good bike shop will have that fixed in 5 minutes, the other kind will have you looking at new bikes.



    If you get a chance.... Follow a riders return to the bike after a 15+ year "offseason" http://theprodigalcyclistca.blogspot.com/
     
  4. cloudhead

    cloudhead New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I do have a fantastic mechanic who is also well skilled with frame repair. I'll take it to him and have him give the frame a full inspection to make sure I'm not riding anything suicidal.

    -Court
     
  5. ProdigalCyclist

    ProdigalCyclist New Member

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    Sounds like a very good idea... Good luck!
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. Although I have seen frames whose dropout has been slightly crushed, I don't see the narrowing that everyone else is seeing ...

    • that is, can the end of the axle slide into the dropout when inserted from the OUTSIDE of the frame?

    Have you measured the frame's dropout spacing? Is it 126mm or 130mm?

    Is that a 130mm-or-wider rear wheel?

    Is the dropout and/or derailleur hanger SQUARE with the other dropout?

    I'm just asking.
     
  7. cloudhead

    cloudhead New Member

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    It's a 130mm wheel, that fits except for the dropout. What you see is as far as I can get the axle in--but it's so minute that I think it should be fixable as long as there's no fatigue. I did notice after posting a tiny flat spot behind the dropout, what looks like the impact point. You can barely see it in the photo. Right where that paint crackling is. I don't know if it's square...I'm assuming that since it's misaligned that it is not. I have a great mechanic, as well as a great frame builder, both with the alignment tools and the credentials for a proper diagnosis, so I will find out from one of them and post the prognosis. I've done some pretty crazy work on my old Trek 720 touring bike-- spread the triangle from 120 to 135 with zero problems, so hopefully this will be fine.

    My guess based on that impact point is that the frame was dropped or hit while in storage. It won't be a big loss if it doesn't pan out, but it's such a cool-looking frame that I hope it does.
     
  8. cloudhead

    cloudhead New Member

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    Cool, mechanic said "no problem" and has all the proper tools. I love steel.

    Thanks for the tips,

    -Court
     
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