Wheel out of true after one ride

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rkfast, Apr 28, 2003.

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  1. Rkfast

    Rkfast Guest

    Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my favorite
    local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight
    bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of true
    already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have some
    imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I start
    thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots
    and Im going out of true.

    Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
     
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  2. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's got
    > a slight bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to
    > disparage him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to go out of
    > true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see have
    > some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe after I
    > start thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few
    > roots and Im going out of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?

    Normal? Well, more or less yes. That's not really the question.

    The question is "Should this have happened?" The answer is "no." Unless you weigh 300 lbs and your
    idea of tree roots are like those British Columbia photos in the MTB mags.

    There are lots of possibilities. The wheel builder may not have taken all the spoke twist out (did
    the wheels "ping" when you first rode them?). The wheel may be under-tensioned. The wheel may be
    over tensioned and braking forces revealed this (it'll have four "wows" if that's the case- two in
    each direction alternating).

    In short, take 'em back and say "dude, you need to set these right."
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Tim McNamara
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles on my favorite trails, the rear rim's
    > > got a slight bend to it. These rims were built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont
    > > want to disparage him. BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    > > go out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they
    > > see have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet.
    > > Sure..maybe after I start thrashing them I can see them getting beat up. But again...three
    > > deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going out of true.
    > >
    > > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
    >
    > Normal? Well, more or less yes. That's not really the question.
    >
    > The question is "Should this have happened?" The answer is "no." Unless you weigh 300 lbs and your
    > idea of tree roots are like those British Columbia photos in the MTB mags.

    Well, at least that explains my wheels...

    > There are lots of possibilities. The wheel builder may not have taken all the spoke twist out (did
    > the wheels "ping" when you first rode them?). The wheel may be under-tensioned. The wheel may be
    > over tensioned and braking forces revealed this (it'll have four "wows" if that's the case- two in
    > each direction alternating).

    In BC, we have to deal with these things in a manly way! True story: last week's Twoonie Race was
    held in some pretty wet conditions, mediocre turnout (it appears some of the regulars don't own
    waterproof bikes!) But enough of that. It was a nice ride: brutal climb, followed by wretched
    technical descent. Good for me, since I fall faster than the other two "B" riders that showed up,
    even though the guy who won the previous B group on a rigid singlespeed (a two-speed, really; he had
    a tensioner and a granny ring) brought his hardtail and complained that the course was too technical
    (something about the multi-foot drops on the descent. Yeah, we did that on XC bikes. Well, we in the
    B group walked down them, or because I'm the fastest, fell down them).

    What was the question? Oh yeah, I came in second, because I got confused by the route, slowed down,
    and crashed into the other guy as he tried to pass me. On a fire road. So we picked it up, and
    almost caught the guy who won the B group.

    What was the question? Oh yeah. In BC, all the tree roots look like that. They don't have to go out
    to find special stunt roots or anything.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  4. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    on
    > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it. These rims
    were
    > built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him.
    > BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    go
    > out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see
    > have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe
    > after I start thrashing them
    I
    > can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going out
    > of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?

    If the rims weren't damaged, I think something in the build wasn't right... or maybe not the right
    build for your application. How much out of true is the rear rim? . laterally.... & radially? Were
    the spokes evenly tensioned, per side, to start with? ... yes. you can pluck them and listen to the
    tone. Was there any "pinging" of the spokes as you rode, indicating residual spoke wind-up? Are the
    rims appropriate to your weight and riding application? What spoking pattern? Were the spokes
    aligned at the rim and hub? See the pictures in Jobst Brandt's book, "the Bicycle Wheel".

    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
     
  5. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    on
    > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it. These rims
    were
    > built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him.
    > BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    go
    > out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see
    > have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe
    > after I start thrashing them
    I
    > can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going out
    > of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
    >
    Not everyone's perfect all the time. I'm betting that the builder of your wheels had a few minor
    problems with your wheel that manifested itself on your ride. I know a lot of the wheels I've seen
    built go out of true the first ride. After being re-trued it should be fine till you hit something.

    Mike
     
  6. "David Ornee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<OXwra.5450$%[email protected]>...
    > "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    > on
    > > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it. These rims
    > were
    > > built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    > him.
    > > BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    > go
    > > out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they
    > > see have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet.
    > > Sure..maybe after I start thrashing them
    > I
    > > can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going
    > > out of true.
    > >
    > > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
    >
    > If the rims weren't damaged, I think something in the build wasn't right... or maybe not the right
    > build for your application. How much out of true is the rear rim? . laterally.... & radially? Were
    > the spokes evenly tensioned, per side, to start with? ... yes. you can pluck them and listen to
    > the tone. Was there any "pinging" of the spokes as you rode, indicating residual spoke wind-up?
    > Are the rims appropriate to your weight and riding application? What spoking pattern? Were the
    > spokes aligned at the rim and hub? See the pictures in Jobst Brandt's book, "the Bicycle Wheel".
    >
    >
    > David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
    What a shame! That's why I bought the cheapest wheels available at Performance and Bike nashbar.
    Never had a problem. Botique wheels are a stinkin' ripoff. Down with wheelbuilders.
     
  7. Rkfast

    Rkfast Guest

    Heres a follow up to the situation:

    Took the bike out again today and trashed the rim a bit. Nothing crazy, but put the bike through
    its paces.

    The wheel got worse.

    ENOUGH!!!

    Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were laced...I guess I
    cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it. But lets just say they werent laced
    in a way that's not exaclty optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB. Something about the way the spokes
    were set up around the flange of the hub.

    The local shop is re-doing the rim.

    "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Got my new hand-built wheels yesterday, slapped em on, set the brakes and off I went to my
    > favorite local trail. After three very deliberate miles
    on
    > my favorite trails, the rear rim's got a slight bend to it. These rims
    were
    > built by what I thought was a good builder and I dont want to disparage
    him.
    > BUT...three pretty careful miles and a few roots later and Im starting to
    go
    > out of true already??? My buddy told me to "lighten up", as all MTB rims given the abuse they see
    > have some imperfections in them as he claims. I dont know if I buy that just yet. Sure..maybe
    > after I start thrashing them
    I
    > can see them getting beat up. But again...three deliberate miles and a few roots and Im going out
    > of true.
    >
    > Is this normal??? Could they just need the tension re-checked and the rim re-trued after a few
    > rides? Do I need to ligthen up?
    >
     
  8. Amit

    Amit Guest

    [email protected] (Jon Isaacs) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >What a shame! That's why I bought the cheapest wheels available at Performance and Bike nashbar.
    > >Never had a problem. Botique wheels are a stinkin' ripoff. Down with wheelbuilders.
    >
    > And how many miles on those "cheapest wheels?"
    >
    > Did you retension them and stress relieve them?
    >
    > Inexpensive wheels can last if they are properly finished but most need some attention.
    >
    > jon

    I agree well built conventional wheels are the most durable, but the original poster's problem is
    very typical. Everyone has their "expert wheel guy" (who they claim is "the best") build them a set,
    but the majority of LBS builders do such a shoddy job they are usually much worse than a factory
    built set.

    People are led to believe the failures they experience happen because they are heavy or very strong
    or especially abusive to their wheels.

    It's time consuming to bring a wheel to optimum tension and make it very round and true. Most aim
    for the latter, and keep the tension low. For this reason store built wheels will probably become
    even more of a rarity.

    -Amit
     
  9. rkfast-<< Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were
    laced...I guess I cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it. But lets just say
    they werent laced in a way that's not exaclty optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB. << Something
    about the way the spokes were set up around the flange of the hub.

    There are lots of ways to lace a wheel and none really make a differenc as to how the wheel
    performs..sounds fishy to me...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. "RkFast" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Took the bike out again today and trashed the rim a bit. Nothing crazy, but put the bike through
    > its paces.

    > The wheel got worse.

    > ENOUGH!!!

    > Took it to the wheelbuilder at the LBS and he told me that indeed the wheels were laced...I guess
    > I cannot say incorrectly, since there are so many ways to do it. But lets just say they werent
    > laced in a way that's not exaclty optimum for the rear wheel of an MTB. Something about the way
    > the spokes were set up around the flange of the hub.

    > The local shop is re-doing the rim.

    I don't think I'd let the shop off that easily. I would want to know exactly what the wheelbuilder
    did wrong and why it was done that way. If the builder was inexperienced and made a mistake I'd want
    to know why this builder was not being supervised by a more knowledgable one.

    When I first started working in shops newly built wheels were expected to go out of true a few times
    before staying true. Now information on correctly building wheels is wide spread and easy to find.
    There is no longer any excuse for a shop to send wheels out the door that aren't built correctly.
    Lots of times I've built wheels for cyclists the night before a race or rally. If these wheels
    didn't work than I'd have a lot of explaining to do.

    Bruce
    --
    Bruce Jackson - Sr Systems Programmer - DMSP, a M/A/R/C Group company
     
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