Wheel truing with dial indicators

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Saltytri, Feb 16, 2003.

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  1. In article <[email protected]>, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Benjamin Weiner wrote:
    >> Hey you hosers,
    >>
    >> This is a BICYCLE newsgroup. Cars are not necessarily elementary common knowledge. There is a
    >> tradition of young people (often men) learning by dinking around with cars in their adolescence,
    >> but not everybody does that.
    >
    >Come to think of it, I guess I think _everyone_ should know at least a little about what goes on
    >inside their car.

    This presupposes that they have one!

    --Bruce F.
     


  2. Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Come to think of it, I guess I think _everyone_ should know at least a little about what goes on
    >inside their car.

    _Everyone_ hasn't got one of the damn things. I haven't.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  3. David Damerell wrote:
    >
    > Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Come to think of it, I guess I think _everyone_ should know at least a little about what goes on
    > >inside their car.
    >
    > _Everyone_ hasn't got one of the damn things. I haven't.

    OK, you're exempt.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [email protected]
     
  4. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    David Damerell writes:

    >> Come to think of it, I guess I think _everyone_ should know at least a little about what goes on
    >> inside their car.

    > _Everyone_ hasn't got one of the damn things. I haven't.

    You don't have to own one to understand their workings, just as I don't have a steam or diesel
    railway locomotive but understand how they work in fairly fine detail. The mechanical and
    thermodynamic complexities of internal combustion engines is essential to many machines and should
    be understood by those affected by their performance. This is especially true for mechanical
    engineers to whom this is like understanding mathematics. It's full of dynamic stress, tribology,
    combustion, heat transfer (solid, liquid and gas), electronics, vibration control, and a slew of
    other considerations.

    Your comment of "one of the damn things" makes me sure I wouldn't want you on my engineering team.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  5. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >David Damerell writes:
    >>>Come to think of it, I guess I think _everyone_ should know at least a little about what goes on
    >>>inside their car.
    >>_Everyone_ hasn't got one of the damn things. I haven't.
    >You don't have to own one to understand their workings,

    Where did I say that I don't understand their workings? I may not know what many of the parts
    look like beyond what is obvious from their function, but that doesn't mean I don't know roughly
    what they are.

    What I objected to was the idea that "everyone" should know about "their" car.

    >Your comment of "one of the damn things" makes me sure I wouldn't want you on my engineering team.

    I don't think the belief that motor cars are socially destructive automatically renders one
    unqualified to be an engineer.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  6. [email protected] wrote:

    > It's not cars but machines that interest mechanically attuned people. Some people do not recognize
    > that we are surrounded by machines and tools, be they child's toys or kitchen mixers. They all
    > deserve scrutiny by the future engineer or household mechanic.

    > I don't share your perception of a mechanically inclined person. I for one, with friends, repaired
    > cars long before I was old enough for a learner's license. It was fixing household equipment and
    > vehicles that I got my engineering education that was formalized later with the underlying science
    > in school.

    I agree, except that I understand the reasons why a young person might not work on cars (bigger,
    expensive, Dad gets madder if you take it apart without knowing how to put it back together).

    Unfortunately, modern gadgets of many kinds are less repairable than their predecessors, due to
    miniaturization, electronics, and cheap labor which makes it cheaper to buy a new gizmo (clock,
    radio, phone, TV, camera) rather than repair one. I enjoy the benefits of these advances but with a
    twinge of regret. As you say there will always be something that a mechanically minded person can
    mess around with. I'd like to think that bicycles will remain so - their dimensions cannot be
    usefully miniaturized and there is limited application for proprietary electronics (I hope!)

    Jobst, have you read "The English Patient"? I think you would enjoy the chapter describing the
    training of the Indian sapper and bomb-defuser, first in India, repairing and improvising fixes to
    keep things running, as one does in countries where resources are scarce, and then in England in the
    bomb squad. His reaction upon coming to England is "There were enough spare parts in England to keep
    India running for a lifetime." I often think of this as I see the increasingly disposable nature of
    the objects we in rich countries are fortunate enough to posess.

    Sorry for the dealy in responding to your post, Ben
     
  7. On 26 Feb 2003, Benjamin Weiner wrote:

    > His reaction upon coming to England is "There were enough spare parts in England
    > to keep India running for a lifetime." I often think of this as I see the
    > increasingly disposable nature of the objects we in rich countries are fortunate
    > enough to posess.

    Starting today I'll feel like an Indian when I walk into my favorite bike shop. There, I am used to
    pick for free used spares to assembly more and more excellent, out of fashion, racing bicycles. I
    dare not think of the day I run short of garage space. Sooner or later it has got to happen.

    Sergio Pisa
     
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