Wheel upgrade,help!



terry potter

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Sep 14, 2005
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Currently I am riding a Specialized Tarmac Pro with a Mavic Ksyrium Equipe wheelset and would like to upgrade my wheelset.
Looking to spent in the area of $1200 or less for a set of clinchers. I am 175lbs, my majority of riding is with the local club with mid week training 250-300k per week total. This year will bring a few century rides and some Masters racing as well. There are so many wheels out there to choose from Zipp, Bontrager etc. I am looking for a light, solid and fast wheel... just what we all would like eh. Thanks for any suggestions, Terry.
 

BikingBrian

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Sep 25, 2003
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This is a 3-step process:

1. Buy a suitable set of handbuilt wheels...go crazy if you like - best groupset hubs (Dura Ace or Record), lightest, most aero spokes (Sapim CX Rays or DT Aerolites), and a nice rim (DT, Mavic, Velocity etc etc) If you would like, add some aluminum colored nipples for neccessary "bling" effect....this package should set you back about $600.

2. Send me the $600 you saved.

3. I have some Mavic stickers I will send you in return, to put on that new wheelset ;)
 

[email protected]

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Dec 30, 2007
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terry potter said:
Currently I am riding a Specialized Tarmac Pro with a Mavic Ksyrium Equipe wheelset and would like to upgrade my wheelset.
Looking to spent in the area of $1200 or less for a set of clinchers. I am 175lbs, my majority of riding is with the local club with mid week training 250-300k per week total. This year will bring a few century rides and some Masters racing as well. There are so many wheels out there to choose from Zipp, Bontrager etc. I am looking for a light, solid and fast wheel... just what we all would like eh. Thanks for any suggestions, Terry.

Have a good wheelbuilder design a wheelset specifically for you and your needs. shimano, Campagnolo or DT hubs, DT or Velocity rims, proper spoke count for you. Stay away from ultra thin spoke, low spoke count wheels. No alloy nipps on no eyelet rims also. Cost less, be more reliable, use standard parts. 'Wheelsouttaboxes are high on hype, high on $, low on long term use.
 

Ne2cyc

New Member
Dec 19, 2007
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terry potter said:
Currently I am riding a Specialized Tarmac Pro with a Mavic Ksyrium Equipe wheelset and would like to upgrade my wheelset.
Looking to spent in the area of $1200 or less for a set of clinchers. I am 175lbs, my majority of riding is with the local club with mid week training 250-300k per week total. This year will bring a few century rides and some Masters racing as well. There are so many wheels out there to choose from Zipp, Bontrager etc. I am looking for a light, solid and fast wheel... just what we all would like eh. Thanks for any suggestions, Terry.
I would take a look at the Rolf Vigor, much lighter than the Ksyruim your on right now, deeper section rim, so this will be a faster wheel by default. There stiff, strong and durable for what your looking for and come in under your price point even, not to mention the new 08's are looking bling bling with the chrome decals.
 

capwater

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Sep 15, 2003
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Ne2cyc said:
I would take a look at the Rolf Vigor, much lighter than the Ksyruim your on right now, deeper section rim, so this will be a faster wheel by default. There stiff, strong and durable for what your looking for and come in under your price point even, not to mention the new 08's are looking bling bling with the chrome decals.

+1 on the Rolf Vigors. Awesome wheelset for about $750. I've raced a pair for 3 seasons, can't say a bad word about 'em. Great in the sprint.
 

Powerful Pete

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May 29, 2004
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Get a set of handbuilts. Why not ride something made just for you?

And you will save a pile of cash for better overall quality.
 

Ne2cyc

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Dec 19, 2007
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Powerful Pete said:
Get a set of handbuilts. Why not ride something made just for you?

And you will save a pile of cash for better overall quality.
Rolf Prima wheels are hand built and yet compete in price with all the machine built wheels.
 

OldGoat

New Member
Nov 13, 2006
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terry potter said:
Currently I am riding a Specialized Tarmac Pro with a Mavic Ksyrium Equipe wheelset and would like to upgrade my wheelset.
Looking to spent in the area of $1200 or less for a set of clinchers. I am 175lbs, my majority of riding is with the local club with mid week training 250-300k per week total. This year will bring a few century rides and some Masters racing as well. There are so many wheels out there to choose from Zipp, Bontrager etc. I am looking for a light, solid and fast wheel... just what we all would like eh. Thanks for any suggestions, Terry.
Kysrium ES wheelsets are being closed out and are on sale everywhere; I got mine for $545US (total for both front & rear). You could also get a nice pair of wheels from Williams for under $500.
http://www.williamscycling.com/
 

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Dec 30, 2007
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OldGoat said:
Kysrium ES wheelsets are being closed out and are on sale everywhere; I got mine for $545US (total for both front & rear). You could also get a nice pair of wheels from Williams for under $500.
http://www.williamscycling.com/

'Off brand hub', may be fine but I think an extra $100 for a better hubset is worth it plus less 'gadget driven designs.
 

rudycyclist

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Mar 14, 2006
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Sorry to advertise here, but I'm selling a set of Bontrager Race X Lite clinchers with a Campy freehub body. They're in excellent condition and are very light (list weight of 1490 grams for the pair) for a clincher set. I"m trying to get $350 for them.

Here is my 2 cents on an upgrade for ya. I'd go with something deep dish if you're racing, preferably a Zipp 404 or something of that nature. The issue I have with deep dish clinchers is that the light weight wheel soon becomes heavy because it's a clincher. For that reason, I'd go with a carbon shallow rim. Like the Bontrager *** Lite (if you're willing to spend $1k+ that is)
 

artemidorus

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Mar 10, 2004
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terry potter said:
Currently I am riding a Specialized Tarmac Pro with a Mavic Ksyrium Equipe wheelset and would like to upgrade my wheelset.
Looking to spent in the area of $1200 or less for a set of clinchers. I am 175lbs, my majority of riding is with the local club with mid week training 250-300k per week total. This year will bring a few century rides and some Masters racing as well. There are so many wheels out there to choose from Zipp, Bontrager etc. I am looking for a light, solid and fast wheel... just what we all would like eh. Thanks for any suggestions, Terry.
If you want a fast wheel for long rides with some wind-breaking, then you want deep section, at least 40-50mm (as long as you don't ride in fierce crosswinds frequently), with slim (steel) bladed spokes . If you want solid, then you need at least a part-alloy rim. The only readily available deep rims that I know with alloy braking surfaces/ bead hooks are Mavic Cosmic Carbone SL or HED Jet 40, 50 or 60. Both these rims are basically an alloy box rim with a deep carbon fairing. The fastest wheels have low spoke counts, 16-20 on the front and 20-24 on the rear - you may think that this will make a weaker wheel, and you should be right, but the only 700C rear wheel that my 90kg bulk has not (yet) broken is a Cosmic Carbone 20-spoke (I have previously destroyed 2 handbuilt 32 spokers and one factory built 32 spoker, all just riding along). The HED rims have the advantage of being available as a rim, so you can put them on to your favourite Campy/Shim/whatever hub. The Cosmic Carbones come with a rear hub of debatable merit.
 

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Felt_Rider said:
Are the ROL wheels similar to Williams for quality and construction?
About the same level +/-?

For the $, I always say stick with a Campagnolo or shimano hubset(or DT, the only other aftermarket hubset worth the $), and have a wheelset designed.
 

Ne2cyc

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Dec 19, 2007
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artemidorus said:
If you want a fast wheel for long rides with some wind-breaking, then you want deep section, at least 40-50mm (as long as you don't ride in fierce crosswinds frequently), with slim (steel) bladed spokes . If you want solid, then you need at least a part-alloy rim. The only readily available deep rims that I know with alloy braking surfaces/ bead hooks are Mavic Cosmic Carbone SL or HED Jet 40, 50 or 60. Both these rims are basically an alloy box rim with a deep carbon fairing. The fastest wheels have low spoke counts, 16-20 on the front and 20-24 on the rear - you may think that this will make a weaker wheel, and you should be right, but the only 700C rear wheel that my 90kg bulk has not (yet) broken is a Cosmic Carbone 20-spoke (I have previously destroyed 2 handbuilt 32 spokers and one factory built 32 spoker, all just riding along). The HED rims have the advantage of being available as a rim, so you can put them on to your favourite Campy/Shim/whatever hub. The Cosmic Carbones come with a rear hub of debatable merit.

This is a common thought, but if done right a lower spoke count wheel is built with higher spoke tensions, which means that the spokes and rims see less of a degree of the tension to detension as the wheel rotates on the road, meaning less fatigue on the wheel its self so it handles the heavier riders better than a low tensioned wheel that will have a larger degree of tension to detension as the wheel works.
 

Felt_Rider

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Oct 24, 2004
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For the $, I always say stick with a Campagnolo or shimano hubset(or DT, the only other aftermarket hubset worth the $), and have a wheelset designed.
I have a set of custom built DT wheels and are my primary wheelset that I use 90% of the time. Very happy with the DT's.

I was just wondering where these guys are getting their hubs manufactured. There seems to be a number of new wheel companies popping up lately. The Chris King hubs seem impressive to a novice like myself, but I don't hear of anyone using them.
 

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Ne2cyc said:
This is a common thought, but if done right a lower spoke count wheel is built with higher spoke tensions, which means that the spokes and rims see less of a degree of the tension to detension as the wheel rotates on the road, meaning less fatigue on the wheel its self so it handles the heavier riders better than a low tensioned wheel that will have a larger degree of tension to detension as the wheel works.

You are neglecting on other large point..these rims are anywhere from 100-300 grams heavier than a lower spoke count wheel. That is more responsible for lack of flex any lighter wheel may have. BUT I still think they way to a reliable wheel is slightly heavier rim and 4 more spokes..not a 600 gram rim with 20 spokes.
 

daveornee

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Sep 18, 2003
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Ne2cyc said:
This is a common thought, but if done right a lower spoke count wheel is built with higher spoke tensions, which means that the spokes and rims see less of a degree of the tension to detension as the wheel rotates on the road, meaning less fatigue on the wheel its self so it handles the heavier riders better than a low tensioned wheel that will have a larger degree of tension to detension as the wheel works.


Please explain how having fewer but higher tensioned spokes makes for less of a degree of tension to detension as the wheel rotates on the road; and therefore less fatiue on the wheel itself..... or did I not understand your assertion.
 

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daveornee said:
So Dave, ya haven't answered me yet. After 1000 wheels, still a hobby or ya taken the plunge into 'retail', with all the problems(and expenses) involved?



Email direct if ya want.
 

Ne2cyc

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Dec 19, 2007
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daveornee said:
Please explain how having fewer but higher tensioned spokes makes for less of a degree of tension to detension as the wheel rotates on the road; and therefore less fatiue on the wheel itself..... or did I not understand your assertion.
[font=&quot]As a wheel rotates and each spoke comes in contact with the road the spoke goes from full tension to decreased or even zero tension. A higher tensioned spoke will have a smaller range of full to zero tension as it passes over the road, this means less fatigue for those working parts.[/font]
 

artemidorus

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Mar 10, 2004
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Ne2cyc said:
A higher tensioned spoke will have a smaller range of full to zero tension as it passes over the road
A high tension spoke, by definition, will have a larger range from full to zero tension. I'm not sure what you mean. I sense that you mean that the proportional range of tension change is smaller, but I don't think that you have established that, or even that it is true.